Sony reveals quad-SSD notebook

vbimport

#1

I just posted the article Sony reveals quad-SSD notebook.

Solid state freaks, Sony might have your next notebook.

Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/sony-reveals-quad-ssd-notebook-25081/](http://www.myce.com/news/sony-reveals-quad-ssd-notebook-25081/)

Feel free to add your comments below. 

Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

The newly-announced Vaio Z series contains four SSDs in a RAID 0 configuration,
:eek: If one of these disc fails, then it’s time to say “goodbye” to all the data. The probability of a failure is much higher than with one single disc.


#3

mciahel, I guess you don’t know what RAID 0 is? If one disk fails, all your data is perfectly safe if RAID 0 is in use.


#4

[QUOTE=Blu-rayFreak;2487267]mciahel, I guess you don’t know what RAID 0 is? If one disk fails, all your data is perfectly safe if RAID 0 is in use.[/QUOTE]Yes, I do know. And yes, the data is perfectly safe - in the nirvana :bigsmile:
You may please do some reading: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RAID#RAID_0

I am not always sure if Wikipedia is a reliable source, but the manual of my Raid controller states similar :cool:

Michael


#5

[QUOTE=Blu-rayFreak;2487267]mciahel, I guess you don’t know what RAID 0 is? If one disk fails, all your data is perfectly safe if RAID 0 is in use.[/QUOTE] RAID 0 provides no redundancy, only capacity. In reality it is not actually RAID at all, since the “R” in RAID stands for Redundant.

The risk of a 4-way RAID failing is approximately 4 times higher than a single drive failing. Provided the probability is very low to start with.


#6

Doh! I was thinking of RAID 1, my bad.


#7

[QUOTE=Blu-rayFreak;2487267]mciahel, I guess you don’t know what RAID 0 is? If one disk fails, all your data is perfectly safe if RAID 0 is in use.[/QUOTE]
I fail to detect any hints of sarcasm, or even a smiley.

Raid 0 = “REDUNDANT ARRAY OF INDEPENDANT DISKS” NOT
Hence the 0.


#8

[QUOTE=Blu-rayFreak;2487296]Doh! I was thinking of RAID 1, my bad.[/QUOTE]

RAID 1 is two disks… If you want mirroring with four disks, you’ll need to use some form of multilevel RAID setup, such as 1+5 or 1+0.

Also, data recovery companies love people who think their data is “perfectly safe” as a result of running RAID :slight_smile:

That said, I suspect running RAID 0 on SSDs is less insane than doing so on HDDs, from an Oh-no-my-data-is-gone! perspective. While both can fail in many different exciting ways, hard disks have an interesting fondness of failing completely with no warning (SMART does NOT always provide warnings), while SDDs, apart from those caused by, for instance, fires, should slowly degrade as the FLASH cells wear out.


#9

Probably too soon to tell - but don’t you think the risk of SSD failure is about 1/4 that of a spinning hard drive? Especially in a laptop?
If so, the risk evens out.


#10

Holy s… I want this notebook o.O …starts @ 1800 :frowning: means not affordable for me.


#11

[QUOTE=nhvideoguy;2487860]Probably too soon to tell - but don’t you think the risk of SSD failure is about 1/4 that of a spinning hard drive? Especially in a laptop?
If so, the risk evens out.[/QUOTE]

Why 1/4 instead of 4% less or 1/4000?

In theory, SLC SSDs commercially available today are much more reliable than MLC SSDs while most tech websites dedicated to storage products for PC seem to agree that even the most popular MLC SSDs are reliable enough.

Anyway, I have 4 SLC SSDs right now to do some RAID 0 tests on three platforms: i7, P35 + E5200, and 785G + Denev. Unfortunately, they are not of the same model. Two are 7535 and the other two are 3525.