Sony Pictures plans Ultra HD Blu-ray on discs

vbimport

#1

We’ve just posted the following news: Sony Pictures plans Ultra HD Blu-ray on discs[newsimage]http://static.myce.com//images_posts/2015/11/sony-pictures-logo-95x75.jpg[/newsimage]
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Read the full article here: http://www.myce.com/news/sony-pictures-plans-ultra-hd-blu-ray-on-discs-77773/

            Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

I’m still not sold on the tech until I can fit an 80" TV in my living room.   I have a 60" and we sit about 12ft away from it.  Bluray looks pretty damn good.  I was all over HD when it came out (it really benefited from the leap in TV tech) but I’m not sold on 4k.  I also don’t feel like building up another physical media collection.  I think I’m good with my current tech for a while.


#3

The first batch of 4K movies from Sony Pictures will include The Amazing Spiderman 2, Pineapple Express, Hancock, Chappie, Salt and The Smurfs 2.

The crowds of people itching to buy those titles in UHD will rival an Apple iPhone release. :disagree:


#4

“I’m still not sold on the tech until I can fit an 80” TV in my living room"

You will be. Next year LG won’t offer anything bigger than 32" in 1080p. Everything bigger will be 4k!
Would expect Sony’s offerings to increase from 50% 4k to about 80% 4k.
You don’t need an 80" to see the difference, my 43" Sony looks absolutely stunning, even when feeding it
720p. Will admit I won’t be chomping at the bit to get a new Bluray player and the few titles that will be initially
available don’t appeal to me in the least. So I’ll wait a bit. Still using my stupidly expensive LG “SuperBlu” player
that will play both Bluray and HD disks.


#5

Yes, LG will attempt to sell lots of Faux-K TVs next year.


#6

Smurfs in 4K, wow, I can’t wait! :wink: I bet people will buy yet another load of old back catalogue movies. 4K Star Wars next.

Stereodude, that was clever, “[I]Faux-K TVs[/I]”


#7

[QUOTE=voxsmart;2763250]Stereodude, that was clever, “[I]Faux-K TVs[/I]”[/QUOTE]
Unfortunately, I can’t take credit for coining it.

http://hdguru.com/new-lg-rgbw-4k-ultra-hd-lcd-line-sparks-debate/


#8

Well, I have no problem plunking down the cash for a uhd tv, uhd player, and uhd movies SO LONG as Cinavia is not involved.


#9

This is great news, finally the final format is here. Why, well if you search the web, 4K format will be the final stop (for a long time anyway). As moving over to 8K seems far away if ever.

And also, all the older 35mm analog films do not have more information than about 3k to 3.5k information in each frame. So all these movies that are remastered, scanned with 4K tech (or even 8k in the future) will not look any better than what ultra HD can provide, that is just a limit we can not overcome.

Over time I think people will rebuild their collections anyway as I see the price for these 4k bluray discs drop crazy fast. The technology works, players only need some minor updates, the 4k TVs have plummeted in price quickly. Because over all all, this is just minor upgrade of already existing technology so they do not need to get a lot of money back, they already got that with the standard bluray format.


What I do not like is the fact that you can not re-scale older formats on a lot of technology, old SDTV looks way crappy on a 1080p not to bad on 720p, but on 4K. Scaling 720*576 in a 4k screen will just be totally horrible.

Would be nice if they had made this into standard on players, TVs so that you can scale the picture source to a good size in relation to the actual pixel screen size. At least then you could watch older stuff on modern equipment without it looking to bad.


#10

I don’t disagree, eventually most TV’s will be 4k, whether or not you take advantage of the higher resolution.

As for me I’m fairly content with my 60" 1080p. It’s not that old, so I’ll probably use it for as long as I can.  I suppose what ever it replaces in 5 or so years (assuming it lasts that long) will be 4k.   I guess I don’t feel the enthusiasm I for 4k as I did for HD when it came out.  Giving the limited space in my living room, I can’t go much more than 60" for a TV (or a unwilling to do).Â

Maybe that’s a good thing.  HD was expensive because I jumped in early.   If I’m not big on 4k, it only means both the equipment and content will be cheaper by the time I do so.


#11

I’ll upgrade when I have the cash and a good deal on a big FALD set comes up. I have a nice Sony 50" HD led set now, had a 42" Sony before, and a 34" CRT HD set before that I bought in 2005.
Lil sisters hubby bought them a 50" Sony UHD set and since he finally got it dialed in even on 1080p stuff it looks really nice and there are bigger and even better looking sets out there.
Vizio makes a very nice set in several sizes with local dimming and full array backlight and LG and a few others make OLED sets that are as nice black level wise and viewing angle as my old CRT set.
We’ll see how life and finances work out as it’s a don’t need but want item and my last two TV’s were Xmas presents or given to me after lil sister upgraded:iagree:


#12

Since my TV is about the size of a garage door, I think I’ll be needing this. Oh wait… my TV isn’t garage-door-sized, so no need to replace
it.


#13

I will eventually upgrade to 4k but am not pressuring myself to do it. Time is on my side and hardware only gets better and more affordable as time passes. Plus, I stream 90% of what I watch in some form so I never see myself building another video library like I did with the DVD format.


#14

How many true 4K movies are out there?

I give it 5 years until UHD comes up in meaningful numbers.


#15

[QUOTE=Millennium12;2763595]How many true 4K movies are out there?

I give it 5 years until UHD comes up in meaningful numbers.[/QUOTE]

Quite a few movies and shows have been shot in 4k in anticipation of making releases in that format at some point in the future.


#16

[QUOTE=UTR;2763597]Quite a few movies and shows have been shot in 4k in anticipation of making releases in that format at some point in the future.[/QUOTE]
Yes, but the vast majority of them have a 2K DI, so UHD Blu-ray is basically moot from a resolution standpoint for most recent movies.


#17

[QUOTE=Stereodude;2763598]Yes, but the vast majority of them have a 2K DI, so UHD Blu-ray is basically moot from a resolution standpoint for most recent movies.[/QUOTE]

Still many recent movies and TV shows have been shot in 4k for later release. Also, many filmed movies going back to he 1950s have 4k resolution and in some cases 8k resolution. Many of these are being converted to 4k digital. I think there will be a lot more 4k content available than many people anticipate. The problem up to now is there hasn’t been a physical media and 4k players available. This will change very soon and then a lot of 4k content will hit the market. The real turning point for 4k is when Comcast, Verizon etc offer 4k service.


#18

[QUOTE=UTR;2763616]Still many recent movies and TV shows have been shot in 4k for later release. Also, many filmed movies going back to he 1950s have 4k resolution and in some cases 8k resolution. Many of these are being converted to 4k digital. I think there will be a lot more 4k content available than many people anticipate. The problem up to now is there hasn’t been a physical media and 4k players available. This will change very soon and then a lot of 4k content will hit the market. The real turning point for 4k is when Comcast, Verizon etc offer 4k service.[/QUOTE]
Do you understand what a DI (Digital Intermediate) is? It doesn’t matter what the movie was shot in. It matters what resolution the DI is in. Very few movies have a 4k DI. There are a few TV shows that are being produced for “4k”, but again, very few.

Besides things with a 4k DI or things produced intentionally for 4k. Old movies that predate the use of a DI with optical prints and no digital special effects are the best candidates for having 4k resolution.

This is why Sony’s list of UHD titles seem like such odd choices. Those are their only recent movies that have 4k resolution end to end.


#19

[QUOTE=Stereodude;2763623]Do you understand what a DI (Digital Intermediate) is? It doesn’t matter what the movie was shot in. It matters what resolution the DI is in. Very few movies have a 4k DI. There are a few TV shows that are being produced for “4k”, but again, very few.[/QUOTE]

What matters is the resolution the original film stock supports. The original can be re-scanned at a higher resolution. Scanning film has become more economically feasible so as long as the original film can support something close to 4k then a new DI can be created. Some film can support resolutions higher than 4k.

[QUOTE=Stereodude;2763623]This is why Sony’s list of UHD titles seem like such odd choices. Those are their only recent movies that have 4k resolution end to end.[/QUOTE]

Demand for 4k will determine how far the movie industry goes with its effort to deliver true 4k content but this is possible and there is a lot of older content that can be converted to true 4k. I would image that anything of substance shot within the past few years (movie or TV) is recorded in 4k and will be offered at 4k resolution through streaming services or hard media.


#20

[QUOTE=UTR;2763658]What matters is the resolution the original film stock supports. The original can be re-scanned at a higher resolution. Scanning film has become more economically feasible so as long as the original film can support something close to 4k then a new DI can be created. Some film can support resolutions higher than 4k.[/QUOTE]
Okay, so it’s now clear you don’t understand what a DI is. You can’t create a new DI without remaking the entire movie from the ground up from the original camera footage/stock. That’s not even possible for movies that were shot on 2K digital cameras. No one is going to invest that amount of money to release a UHD version of an existing movie. They don’t even want to spend the extra money for for a 4K DI on most new releases where it’s only an incremental cost. You’re suggesting they’re going to go back and basically remake the movie without the potential of big box office sales. :disagree: :disagree: :disagree:

Yes, old movies can have 4k or 8k scans of their negatives or film “intermediates”, but those are old catalog titles. Again, a lot of money for a questionable return in potential sales. Still, these are much more likely than your theory of creating a 4k/UHD DI, but it’s going to be only popular blockbuster type titles.