Sony outlines future DRM for 4k video

vbimport

#1

We’ve just posted the following news: Sony outlines future DRM for 4k video

Sony once again shows their true colors, attempting to control all aspects of media distribution and playback, as they look forward to the adoption of 4k video by the public.
Read the full article here:http://www.myce.com/news/sony-outlines-future-drm-for-4k-video-67767/

            Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

I’m so happy to know what Sony thinks will happen. They’ve been right so many times before. :rolleyes:


#3

Tying us into only being able to buy one of there TV’s to use with the player, and f—ing us by making it as difficult to play legally acquired content at the same time. Gee, Sony seems to be on a roll here. Surely there greatest aspirations have been accomplished with these new standards.

Personally, I would love to see Richard Stallman take control of this company. Imagine how much better the actual technology would be with someone who focuses less on giving his most loyal customers the finger, and more on actually pushing technology to its limits. I’ll bet with that kind of public image, piracy of Sony products would be cut in half, despite being easier to do.


#4

Sony I thought they were out of business by now. if not they will be.


#5

[QUOTE=samlar;2692287]Sony I thought they were out of business by now. if not they will be.[/QUOTE]

Yup, I agree, I keep hoping that Sony will go bust, although I would feel sorry for the employees on the ground level loosing their jobs.

Sony you are really not very bright are you, You must by now on the worlds largest S#*t list and with this latest idea, it will be even bigger.


#6

they are on mine


#7

They can keep their TV, their player and their 4k and their drm.
I don’t want or need any of it.


#8

That’s just the step before they want to use a webcam to see who and how many people are watching which movie. Oh wait, Microsoft already does that with Xbox One. So Sony would probably infringe a patent and that’s why they don’t use it yet.


#9

While there is a pretty clear difference between standard and high definition, I’m sure no one can tell the difference between 1080p and 4K unless they are looking at a gigantic (e.g. 80"+) TV or standing right in front of the TV.

In our living room, if I connect my laptop to the TV (37") and sit ~15 feet (~3m) away, I cannot read small print on the screen and the same for anyone else I know. So it’s pretty clear that if the TV was 4K, there’s no way I would seeing anything that I wouldn’t see with 1080p at this distance.

The DRM is basically nonsense. Who ever can afford a suitably large TV to take advantage of 4K can obviously afford to pay for the titles to play on it and of course it’s going to be these paying customers that will treated like potential criminals by this DRM.


#10

I would agree. 4k benefits those with larger TV’s the most… Somewhere between 70 and 80 inch TV’s. They may have plateu’d with average TV size around 50 to 55 inches because people run out of space.

HD was a natural progression. There was a big bump in tv tech and the new tv’s really benefited from it.

Not sure asking people to buy 80 inch TV’s is as attractive.

As for the DRM. What’s the point. Someone will crack it. Sony will sell their DRM’d 4k content on the net, which no one will download because of the file size, cost, and that they don’t have a big tv. Those that do can pirate and get better DRM copies for free?