Sony and Toppan Printing develop paper Blu-ray Disc

I just posted the article Sony and Toppan Printing develop paper Blu-ray Disc.

The British website Digitmag.co.uk reports that
Sony has developed a paper Blu-ray disc. The discs are developed together with
the Japanese printing company Toppan Printing and the development…

Read the full article here:  [http://www.cdfreaks.com/news/8137-Sony-and-Toppan-Printing-develop-paper-Blu-ray-Disc.html](http://www.cdfreaks.com/news/8137-Sony-and-Toppan-Printing-develop-paper-Blu-ray-Disc.html)

Feel free to add your comments below. 

Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

what happens if they get wet??:stuck_out_tongue:

Hopefully then it will be Sapphire water http://www.nypost.com/business/18275.htm :slight_smile:

I Wonder if they will cost as much as paper? :g

I was about to say the same thing as dvd_baqup, What happens when it gets wet? No matter how dense they put the paper together, moisture will damage it. The most dense form of paper we know is wood and even that gets destroyed in water. How exactly is the blu ray beam able to see through the paper? This whole thing sounds like a farce. PS: and saphire water doesn’t relate to the subject at all. The press release says it doesn’t harm electronics and that’s only becuz it doesn’t conduct electricity. jef195 needs to get a clue :stuck_out_tongue:

Rhelic your an idiot the Sapphire water does’nt harm paper. 2)I meant it as sort of a side joke that obviuosly a low intellect like yourself did’nt get. :slight_smile:

One other problem with paper is its short life time since paper goes brown and brittle after a few years. While I am not sure if this affect the disc’s readability, older discs may be more likely to self destruct when spun up. :stuck_out_tongue: I wonder if these discs can be cleaned if they get dirty, especially if handled by kids and those who still don’t even handle CDs correctly.

seanbyrne. Yes i read some threads and articles and they don’t answer that.

Rhelic sorry for being crude. Some spokesperson from Tyco came on CNBC a few days back and he was parading the benefits of such Water one of his main selling points which he kept pushing was paper was safe with the water. So that was what i was trying to convey :slight_smile:

They said the same thing about papyrus when it first came out I am sure. Good lord, we must continue chipping our thoughts on stone for it will last the test of time. LOL We need more information before we can pass judgement on this awesome idea. Even if it is paper as a major component, it does not mean that there will not be a thin laminate or something to protect the data from the elements and time. “By replacing most of the plastic in a disc with paper it could also aid recycling of products such as magazines bundled with discs, Takamine said.” If they were to let slip details of such a method, someone would get their *ss kicked right now. This is the kind of thinking that is needed in the industry to help with the development of new products. I think it is a fantastic idea! :slight_smile: Let’s keep an eye on this one. :d
[edited by Crabbyappleton on 15.04.2004 23:59]

There are so many questions… 1) What about reliability? Paper can bend/fold much more easily than plastic. 2) Moisture? 3) Tolerance of heat? 4) Compatibility with devices (how will a slot-loader, if there are any, like a paper-based disc?) 5) Etc.
[edited by code65536 on 16.04.2004 00:26]

it’s rare when a news item brings up more interesting questions than it answers. This is interesting and in the past I wondered if it was possible to reduce the need for plastics in the manufacture of discs. Overall, very fasicnating news item. Strange there was no mention of CDs in there. Could this supposed “news item” be a cheap publicity tactic to promote Blu Ray? I hope not…

“Paper” can mean a lot of things… Just like metal can be alloyed to produce different properties, paper can be produced lots of ways with fibers that contain other items (think of carbon fiber as an example here) to make them more damage-resistant. Or, if the disc is mostly paper, but then laminated in plastic (after all, the disc is only 51% paper), it would probably limit issues with moisture.