Sony: “50% of consumers prefer a curved TV over flat model”

vbimport

#1

We’ve just posted the following news: Sony: “50% of consumers prefer a curved TV over flat model”[newsimage]http://static.myce.com//images_posts/2015/01/myce-sony-curved-tv-95x75.jpg[/newsimage]

About 50% of the consumers prefer a curved TV over a flat model, according to consumer research from Sony.

            Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/sony-50-of-consumers-prefer-a-curved-tv-over-flat-model-74229/](http://www.myce.com/news/sony-50-of-consumers-prefer-a-curved-tv-over-flat-model-74229/)

            Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

From consumer research the company has learned about 50% of the consumers prefer a curved TV over a TV with a flat panel.
Wait so whom did the research and paid for it? Sony…who else…

Also…

TP Vision, the company that develops and manufacturers Philips branded TVs is sceptical about curved TVs and claims flat TVs have better image quality.
And a company manufacture already says so and Sony says they still want Curve? I doubt Sony manufactures the Displays…

I believe Sony as much as rubbing salt into wounds…


#3

If the screen is bigger than 75" then curved is fine, if its smaller then I dont see why you would like to have one on your living room.
OK, maybe you want to torture some of your friend that try to watch the movie with you.


#4

“About 50% of the consumers prefer a curved TV over a flat model, according to consumer research from Sony.”

How do 50% of consumers know this, I doubt anywhere near 50% of consumers have ever seen a curved TV. I asked a salesman at a Best Buy and at a Costco in Colorado Springs, CO, if they were selling a lot of the new curved screen TVs. They both said there was interest when they first became available, but it has died down quite a bit already. In my opinion, curved screens take away too much of the viewing angle, and the images near the sides of them look a bit darker and distorted if not viewed fairly straight on. I remember back in the 70s or 80s, some theater chains installed curved screens in a few of their theaters, and called them cinemas. There was one in my home town of Fargo, ND. But it’s been a long time since I’ve seen a curved screen at a movie theater.


#5

Never underestimate the power of marketing and the gullibility of many people.


#6

[QUOTE=vroom;2745045]If the screen is bigger than 75" then curved is fine, if its smaller then I dont see why you would like to have one on your living room.
OK, maybe you want to torture some of your friend that try to watch the movie with you.[/QUOTE]
I saw a 55" curved screen 4K TV at Costco for 999.99, it was a Sony Bravia I think, it was awesome.


#7

The only reason why you “need” a curved screen is that LCD doesn’t have good enough viewing angles for the use cases they’re trying to sell now. With UHD resolution you have to sit close enough to the screen to realize the extra resolution that there’s a fairly significant viewing angle discrepancy between the center of the screen and the edges. This means there is a visible loss of contrast and a corresponding shift in the gamma curve from the center to the edges. By curving the screen they can reduce the effective angle variance between the center and the edges achieving a more uniform performance.

This also means the curve only improves viewing for the person exactly in the middle of the display and they have to be close enough to the TV also. Everyone else not dead center isn’t likely to realize any improvement and the people off to the sides will have a worse viewing experience. The curve also introduces geometric distortions in the image.

The real solution is to improve of axis viewing angles of LCDs or use a different display technology that doesn’t have a viewing angle problem, not curve the display.


#8

Most “consumer research” is bogus and is an attempt to justify whatever the company wants to do rather than what the consumer really wants. Same category as “back by popular demand”, “our customers demanded this feature” and “voted best (whatever) in the area”.Â


#9

Most “consumer research” is bogus and is an attempt to justify whatever the company wants to do rather than what the consumer really wants. Same category as “back by popular demand”, “our customers demanded this feature” and “voted best (whatever) in the area”.Â


#10

[QUOTE=alan1476;2745089]I saw a 55" curved screen 4K TV at Costco for 999.99, it was a Sony Bravia I think, it was awesome.[/QUOTE]

If you are looking straight at the TV the picture is great and most likly you have a more cinematic experience, but how about the those that will be on the left and the right side of the living room?


#11

Saw a Samsung at Costco myself, looked great, but still don’t want a curved screen, why should I?
I also think it’s kinda a copout for lousy viewing angles of most cheaper LCD sets using non IPS screens.
I think like said it makes your big screen actually smaller, and I bet they are just trying to find new features to entice consumers to buy yet another TV.
I got a 42" Sony set in 2012 for Xmas, black levels and veiwing angle were great, far better then I expected, and recently my lil sister and her hubby who were behind getting us the 42 got a new Sony UHD 50" set and gave us their old 2012 50" LED Sony they bought the same time they got us that 42". This set also has great black levels and viewing angles and I love it and the fact my family shares their toys as they upgrade:clap: Sony must have stepped up the IPS screen use or are using some other tech for their medium range sets now as I’m quite happy with them.
I do want a UHD set, not curved, and we’ll see how this year pans out for toy money but I can happily watch what I have now for a while and have no regrets, plus it’s easy to wall mount if I decide to.


#12

[QUOTE=Stereodude;2745090]The only reason why you “need” a curved screen is that LCD doesn’t have good enough viewing angles for the use cases they’re trying to sell now. With UHD resolution you have to sit close enough to the screen to realize the extra resolution that there’s a fairly significant viewing angle discrepancy between the center of the screen and the edges. This means there is a visible loss of contrast and a corresponding shift in the gamma curve from the center to the edges. By curving the screen they can reduce the effective angle variance between the center and the edges achieving a more uniform performance.

This also means the curve only improves viewing for the person exactly in the middle of the display and they have to be close enough to the TV also. Everyone else not dead center isn’t likely to realize any improvement and the people off to the sides will have a worse viewing experience. The curve also introduces geometric distortions in the image.

The real solution is to improve of axis viewing angles of LCDs or use a different display technology that doesn’t have a viewing angle problem, not curve the display.[/QUOTE]

:iagree::iagree::iagree::iagree:


#13

Mr Kawamura must be on the marketing team that thought curved screens were a good idea. In the year or so that they’ve been available I’ve had only a handful of inquiries about curved screens. Sent the customers to look at one at another shop only to have them come back and tell me to sell them something flat.Might have a place in the gaming/simulator world.


#14

[QUOTE=pcarey;2745099]Most “consumer research” is bogus and is an attempt to justify whatever the company wants to do rather than what the consumer really wants. Same category as “back by popular demand”, “our customers demanded this feature” and “voted best (whatever) in the area”. [/QUOTE]
While I’m also highly skeptical of that sort of nonsense too. In this case Sony hasn’t been a big pusher of curved displays. They have very few of them compared to Samsung.

[QUOTE=vroom;2745103]If you are looking straight at the TV the picture is great and most likly you have a more cinematic experience, but how about the those that will be on the left and the right side of the living room?[/QUOTE]
The slightly curved screens in theaters were used as a band-aid for the fact that the projector lenses couldn’t maintain focus at the edges of the screen compared to the center because the distance from the lens was different enough. They were also usually curved both vertically and horizontally. They were never about providing a more immersive feel.


#15

I’ll just leave this here:

//youtu.be/ZHjsKHKKnw0