Some newer Questions

Been looking at getting a TV finally and noticed they have the resolutions well that’s easy the wife and I are getting a 1080p but I have been seeing these TV’s that also say 120 mghz as well so I am wondering what is the difference between the 1080p LCD and the 1080p LCD @ 120 mghz?

Marketing.

What specs does the other LCD have?

What you end up with is a smoother flowing picture, but it’s dependant on the source, and the particular t.v.'s ability to deal with the input.

The most common refresh rate for today’s Televisions are 60hz for NTSC-based systems and 50hz for PAL-based systems. However, with the introduction of some Blu-ray Disc and HD-DVD players that can actually output a 24 frame per second video signal, instead of the traditional 30 frame per second video signal, new refresh rates are being implemented by some television display makers to accommodate these signals in the correct mathematical ratio.

If you have a TV with a 120hz refresh rate that is 1080p/24 compatible (1920 pixels across the screen vs 1080 pixels down the screen, with a 24 frame per second rate). The TV ends up displaying 24 separate frames every second, but repeats each frame according to the refresh rate of the TV. In the case of 120hz each frame would be displayed 5 times within each 24th of a second.

In other words, even with higher refresh rates, there are still only 24 separate frames displayed every second, but they may need to be displayed multiple times, depending on the refresh rate.

To display 24 frames per second on a TV with a 120hz refresh rate, each frame is repeated 5 times every 24th of a second.

To display 24 frames per second on a TV with a 72hz refresh rate, each frame is repeated 3 times every 24th of a second.

To display 30 frames per second on a TV with a 60 hz refresh rate, each frame is repeated 2 times every 30th of a second.

To display 25 frames per second on a TV with a 50 hz refresh rate (PAL Countries), each frame is repeated 2 times every 25th of a second.

To display 25 frames per second on a TV with a 100 hz refresh rate (PAL Countries), each frame is repeated 4 times every 25th of a second.

If the television is also required to do a 24 frame per second to 30 frame per second or vice versa frame rate conversion, then you also have to deal with 3:2 or 2:3 Pulldown as well where the 24 frames of film will be stretched onto 30 frames.

:cool::cool:

That makes sense they are a bit higher guessing cause they are newer? Chef not really sure on the detailed specs as I don’t note each little thing just yet.

In very general terms, you’d expect the 120Hz display to be better in every area, due to the superior electronics. You’d expect, for example, it to correctly de-interlace and upscale lower res images with better quality. Experience teaches us though that expectations and reality do not always meet. The only way to evaluate such things is through online reviews, since in-store staff don’t have a clue. If the price difference is small, by all means go with the 120Hz model. It will play with HD disc players better and should do a better job of displaying HDTV images too. Though it’s also good to note that at screen sizes smaller than 50", the differences are not always easy to see.

Thanks for the good info. My Samsung 4671 is 120 hz and both my Blu-ray and HD-DVD players are 1080p/24F capable but I have never been able to see the difference when set to Auto, High, Med, Low or Off, however I did see a demo the other day that had buildings scrolling by. One building had a clock and on the non 120hz side you could see the hands but on the 120hz side you could tell the time and the hands were much clearer/sharper (demo disc though). Like Dan said maybe I am not seeing it because I have a 46" tv. My brother just bought a 4681 LED Smart lighting and I can’t tell the difference between his and mine either.:bigsmile:

[quote=platinumsword;1987230]What you end up with is a smoother flowing picture, but it’s dependant on the source, and the particular t.v.'s ability to deal with the input.

The most common refresh rate for today’s Televisions are 60hz for NTSC-based systems and 50hz for PAL-based systems. However, with the introduction of some Blu-ray Disc and HD-DVD players that can actually output a 24 frame per second video signal, instead of the traditional 30 frame per second video signal, new refresh rates are being implemented by some television display makers to accommodate these signals in the correct mathematical ratio.

If you have a TV with a 120hz refresh rate that is 1080p/24 compatible (1920 pixels across the screen vs 1080 pixels down the screen, with a 24 frame per second rate). The TV ends up displaying 24 separate frames every second, but repeats each frame according to the refresh rate of the TV. In the case of 120hz each frame would be displayed 5 times within each 24th of a second.

In other words, even with higher refresh rates, there are still only 24 separate frames displayed every second, but they may need to be displayed multiple times, depending on the refresh rate.

To display 24 frames per second on a TV with a 120hz refresh rate, each frame is repeated 5 times every 24th of a second.

To display 24 frames per second on a TV with a 72hz refresh rate, each frame is repeated 3 times every 24th of a second.

To display 30 frames per second on a TV with a 60 hz refresh rate, each frame is repeated 2 times every 30th of a second.

To display 25 frames per second on a TV with a 50 hz refresh rate (PAL Countries), each frame is repeated 2 times every 25th of a second.

To display 25 frames per second on a TV with a 100 hz refresh rate (PAL Countries), each frame is repeated 4 times every 25th of a second.

If the television is also required to do a 24 frame per second to 30 frame per second or vice versa frame rate conversion, then you also have to deal with 3:2 or 2:3 Pulldown as well where the 24 frames of film will be stretched onto 30 frames.

:cool::cool:[/quote]

I have had my HDTV for about a year now & I have noticed when there is any movement there is picture blurring. I saw some of the new 120hz tv’s at best buy the other day & one had the demo scrolling across the screen with a divider in the middle to show the difference 120 hz makes. I gotta tell ya, they got me convinced. That picture was absolutely beautiful.

[quote=platinumsword;1987230]What you end up with is a smoother flowing picture, but it’s dependant on the source, and the particular t.v.'s ability to deal with the input.

The most common refresh rate for today’s Televisions are 60hz for NTSC-based systems and 50hz for PAL-based systems. However, with the introduction of some Blu-ray Disc and HD-DVD players that can actually output a 24 frame per second video signal, instead of the traditional 30 frame per second video signal, new refresh rates are being implemented by some television display makers to accommodate these signals in the correct mathematical ratio.

If you have a TV with a 120hz refresh rate that is 1080p/24 compatible (1920 pixels across the screen vs 1080 pixels down the screen, with a 24 frame per second rate). The TV ends up displaying 24 separate frames every second, but repeats each frame according to the refresh rate of the TV. In the case of 120hz each frame would be displayed 5 times within each 24th of a second.

In other words, even with higher refresh rates, there are still only 24 separate frames displayed every second, but they may need to be displayed multiple times, depending on the refresh rate.

To display 24 frames per second on a TV with a 120hz refresh rate, each frame is repeated 5 times every 24th of a second.

To display 24 frames per second on a TV with a 72hz refresh rate, each frame is repeated 3 times every 24th of a second.

To display 30 frames per second on a TV with a 60 hz refresh rate, each frame is repeated 2 times every 30th of a second.

To display 25 frames per second on a TV with a 50 hz refresh rate (PAL Countries), each frame is repeated 2 times every 25th of a second.

To display 25 frames per second on a TV with a 100 hz refresh rate (PAL Countries), each frame is repeated 4 times every 25th of a second.

If the television is also required to do a 24 frame per second to 30 frame per second or vice versa frame rate conversion, then you also have to deal with 3:2 or 2:3 Pulldown as well where the 24 frames of film will be stretched onto 30 frames.

:cool::cool:[/quote]
Great info.

I think the other thing to point out is that some TV’s (see Sony Bravia atm) are not just duplicating one frame but are building a mixture of frame one and two and slotting it inbetween. This should give even better results (if it gets it right) because instead of a static picture for 2 frames you now have a change every frame hopefully giving an even smoother experience.

They havn’t upted it to 100Mhz yet (PAL region here :wink: ) so that is a combination of building a new frame and the duplicating one as well.

For personnel experience it works about 97.5% of the time.

I guess we now know why a consumer can get frustrated. There are always little variables to everything.:slight_smile:

:cool::cool: