Some basic noob questions about DV capture and interlace phenomena

vbimport

#1

hi all, recently i bought a DV camcorder, and started looking for guides about DV caputre, encoding, what is mostly recommended and other related posts… i learned quite a lot during these brief tutorials, but still i have some quite basic questions that i want to get out of the way, before I start downloading all of my minicasettes to DVDs,

1.i bought my camera in USA, this means that it shoots in NTSC format, right? i would like to check that, what is the easiest way to do that… all cameras that record on tape (digital or analog), record interlaced videos…right? so my camera records video in NTSC-interlaced format…?

2.i tried to use different softwares to capture my video (just capture), but it turned out that different programs capture differently, with big differences in quality, thats why i am FORCED to ask the following question:
What software is recommended to use just for capture, no video editing or encoding) i tried some of them and Adobe premiere’s capturing tools seems to be quite good

3.when i capture with movie maker’s capturing tool and after that i play the raw captured video with classic media player, just after caputre, (before closing movie maker), it will play the video interlaced (the interlace artifacts are clearly visible), and the video it somewhat brighter, very pale, but brighter, the moment i close movie maker, the interlacing will dissappear, and the video will become darker… is there a specific reason for that…?

4.lets see if i got the interlace issue right, at all. interlaced video is the one that each frame contain two fields that show in turn, one after another… and progressive scan videos are made of pure frames, no fields… right?

5.if i am playing video that is interlaced, to a progressive scan display, i would know couse the video would consist interalce artifacts, what about if i play progressive video on interlace based display, how would i know…

6.if my dvd player has a label on in saying that it plays progressive scan does this mean that i should not worry about videos being interlaced or not, couse my player will take care of this automaticly???

7.how do i asure my self that my TV is PAL and DOES NOT support progressive scan…

8.when i start a new project on adobe premiere it will ask me what type of project I want to use:
24P, NTSC and PAL, (NTSC and PAL are reffering to interlaced i assume, couse there is a separate project for 24 progressive)… now if my camera is shooting on NTSC-interlaced and my DVD player supports progressive scan on both NTSC and PAL, and my TV i PAL-interlaced, what project type should i use of the above three…?

9.telecine process is the one that will convert progressive cinema frames to NTSC interlaced frames, ? and IVTC is the process from interlaced NTSC to progressive NTSC?

10.encoding in Divx or Xvid, can i add chater or make menus, like in MPEG2 encoding (DVD format), what about VCD and SVCD, are these any good, i am really having a hard time decideing what type of encoding should i use. quality and size both matter

well, thats it, 10x to those who actualy reached the end, and anyone who wishes to reply…


#2

Unless specified otherwise, yes, they record in interlaced format. Some newer cams have a recording mode called “24p” which records in progressive format, but those are a bit more expensive. NTSC is the TV standard used in North America (and Australia if I am not mistaken) so yes your DV Cam purchased in the U.S. will record and play in NTSC. The DV file should be 720x480 (for NTSC) and with a frame rate of 29.97. Also keep in mind that the DV format uses lower fields first interlacing, so if you edit on your computer and need to render some scenes make sure it is set to lower fields first.

2.i tried to use different softwares to capture my video (just capture), but it turned out that different programs capture differently, with big differences in quality, thats why i am FORCED to ask the following question:
What software is recommended to use just for capture, no video editing or encoding) i tried some of them and Adobe premiere’s capturing tools seems to be quite good

The capture software and quality is irrelevant since you are using a DV camcorder which records in digital format. You are putting the good quality to waste if you are capturing from the analog outputs. Since the recording is digital all you need to do is transfer the data to your PC - (much like transfering a file from one HD to another) without any encoding or loss in quality since you are importing the AVI DV from the miniDV tape. For that you need a firewire cable, and one of many softwares that can capture / import the digital data through a IEEE1394 interface. No matter what software you use for capturing through firewire will always provide the same quality. Yes adobe premiere can do that - Instead of capturing from an analog device, set your adobe premiere to capture from IEEE1394 device. Once you do so and hit F5, you should see a window with a timecode and be able to control your camera’s function onscreen and hit record. Make sure you have the appropriate drivers, that your camcorder’s dv device is detected, that the cable is plugged and that the camera mode is set to VTR (and not camera) and the appropriate menu selection is made for DV OUT.

Make sure you use the NTFS file format to allow files greater than 4GB and not FAT32 as DV files are very large (25mbit compression rate) and 1 full minidv tape which is around 60 minutes equals 13GB.

3.when i capture with movie maker’s capturing tool and after that i play the raw captured video with classic media player, just after caputre, (before closing movie maker), it will play the video interlaced (the interlace artifacts are clearly visible), and the video it somewhat brighter, very pale, but

Perfectly normal. A TV signal is interlaced - Your computer monitor is NON interlaced. Don’t worry about that, once you edit your video and put it on DVD and play it on a regular TV set the picture will be clean and you won’t see those artifacts.

Also by default your windows media player might be playing your DV file using HALF resolution (to save on CPU cycles). You will need to go in the settings and performance and set to FULL sized video. Also do not expect to get optimal quality when playback using media player. These type of videos are best seen on standard TVs.

brighter, the moment i close movie maker, the interlacing will dissappear, and the video will become darker… is there a specific reason for that…?

Your player is using your videocard’s OVERLAY function for accelerating video processing functions - Go to your graphic card’s color correction function if supported and look for the overlay color correction and from there you can adjust the brightness, contrast, gamma, etc.

4.lets see if i got the interlace issue right, at all. interlaced video is the one that each frame contain two fields that show in turn, one after another… and progressive scan videos are made of pure frames, no fields… right?

Yes, progressive means the sweep is sequential, it is progressive. Interlaced on your TV means that the picture is drawn by alternating lines… Example (in this case we are talking about DV which uses lower fields first)


… shown (EVEN field)

… (EVEN field)

… (EVEN field)
etc…

(the … representing your TV… The EVEN fields are sweeped first on your TV set… Once it reaches the bottom a new sweep is done this time for the ODD fields…) All this occurs at an extremely high rate so your eyes sees a clean picture.

5.if i am playing video that is interlaced, to a progressive scan display, i would know couse the video would consist interalce artifacts, what about if i play progressive video on interlace based display, how would i know…

Exactly. There exists some different methods of converting interlaced video to progressive video using different methods but I won’t go there - too technical.

As to the opposite, if you attempt to play a progressive video on an interlaced display you will notice this by jerky movements rather than interlacing lines. You will notice this especially during pans, people walking, moving, etc… it will be quite noticable :smiley:

6.if my dvd player has a label on in saying that it plays progressive scan does this mean that i should not worry about videos being interlaced or not, couse my player will take care of this automaticly???

You should not worry - it means that your DVD player is “progressive” ready and will display video progressively on a supporting tv set through the appropriate connections. Otherwise for the standard analog outputs to your regular interlaced TV, the DVD will play just fine, the DVD player takes care of the 3:2 pulldown automatically if necessary, so don’t worry :slight_smile:

Some DVD players, like my SONY player has a PROGRESSIVE button the front where you can switch from AUTO, ON or INTERLACED.

8.when i start a new project on adobe premiere it will ask me what type of project I want to use:
24P, NTSC and PAL, (NTSC and PAL are reffering to interlaced i assume, couse there is a separate project for 24 progressive)… now if my camera is shooting on NTSC-interlaced and my DVD player supports progressive scan on both NTSC and PAL, and my TV i PAL-interlaced, what project type should i use of the above three…?

Remember to always MATCH your project settings to your captured source. If your source is NTSC DV 29.97, then you will need to open a project that uses an NTSC DV template. Opening a wrong project will cause your final export to completly render the entire footage rather than just the effects (you do not want that) :slight_smile:

9.telecine process is the one that will convert progressive cinema frames to NTSC interlaced frames, ? and IVTC is the process from interlaced NTSC to progressive NTSC?

Inverse telecine (3:2 pulldown) if I am not mistaken.

10.encoding in Divx or Xvid, can i add chater or make menus, like in MPEG2 encoding (DVD format), what about VCD and SVCD, are these any good, i am really having a hard time decideing what type of encoding should i use. quality and size both matter

I am not sure about DivX - I believe that the new DivX 6 format supports authoring with menus - you have to check on the DivX site for that.

As to the final product, I recommend it to be DVD. MPEG-2 DVD uses the SAME resolution as DV (720x480) so there is no resizing and loss of resolution. With a good quality encoder you should have a DVD that is just as good looking as your DV. VCD and SVCD uses lower resolution and will result in a loss of quality. As to DVD, I would not recommend using Adobe Premiere’s built-in encoder (the main concept) it is not the best quality you will get.

Some peopel claim TMPGenc can do a good job with that. If you can afford it you can also get yourself the CCE (Cinemacraft Encoder).

Check out some sites like vcdhelp.com and doom9.org for articles and info / reviews on all the software you will need for doing this.


#3

saw this at videohelp


#4

The method I use is to record the DV tapes direct to DVD using my Philips DVD recorder (On HQ setting). There is no noticeable loss in quality.
Then import the VOB files into MPeg Video wizard, edit, overdub and whatever before sending to Ulead Workshop 2 for menu construction and creating chapters.


#5

hi and thanks for your answers… sorry that it took me so long to reply, but i was …internetless for almost two weeks now…

before posting, i just want to add the followings: my video camera IS NTSC, i use both,NTSC and PAL mini cassetes, my TV is PAL, both my camera and TV are interlaced and most importatly i want to be able to play the end-up videos both on computer and TV, so i would want to stick interlaced, which is good, couse i don’t have to run the additional processing of de-interlacing…

@greg42

ok, now this editing… this is just an option right …if i dont wont to add any extra effects on my video, i can just add the menus, devide into chapters and then just start encoding to MPEG-2 right… so i dont have to deal with telling the editing program what fields are first. but if i decide to edit… can Adobe premiere do all that… capturing, editing, adiing menus chapters, encoding…(everything that is needed to bring video from DV tape to proffesionaly made DVD-video) or do i need additional softwares??? i got the message about the buit-in encoder not to be the best… but unffortenatly i already got adobe - so no going back… :frowning:

I am using firewire cable…

here is what some guy said to me… and i am a little confused…
"8. Because you watch on a PAL TV, you should use PAL project settings. There is no problem improting NTSC material into a PAL project but it will need to be completely rendered. "

@nicadair

so you prefer to use different tools for every aspect of the processing… you use direct encoding… you encode to MPEG-2 while capturing from DV tape…?


#6

[QUOTE=
@nicadair
so you prefer to use different tools for every aspect of the processing… you use direct encoding… you encode to MPEG-2 while capturing from DV tape…?[/QUOTE]

There is no noticeable loss in quality.
I use Mpeg wizard for editing but for menus Ulead Workshop is excellent.
The finished DVD looks [U]PROFESSIONAL[/U] :iagree:


#7

as far as i understand this stuff and read in other guides, the Adobe premiere is a tool that uses the main concept codec do encode to MPEG-2, so main concept is just a codec… like DivX or Xvid, the TMPGenc is a tool that can use the main concept also??? and so is CCE… so what is the difference what software should i use if my codec is one and only one - the main concept … :slight_smile:
P.S. i am shure i didn’t get something right, so pls explain:)