Software compatibility shifting away from Windows XP

vbimport

#1

I just posted the article Software compatibility shifting away from Windows XP.

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Click to read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/software-compatibility-shifting-away-from-windows-xp-63801/](http://www.myce.com/news/software-compatibility-shifting-away-from-windows-xp-63801/)

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#2

It’s been that way with peripherals forever. I had to forsake a perfectly good scanner that saw me through 3 OSes when I got W7. I can still fire up my XP laptop to use it…


#3

Compatibility is lost in the other direction too; 16-bit Windows applications don’t run on Windows 7/8 (except using a virtual machine), and there are plenty of abandoned 32-bit programs that worked on Windows XP but don’t work on Windows 7 (at least not on 64-bit).


#4

[QUOTE=olyteddy;2654793]I can still fire up my XP laptop to use it…[/QUOTE]
Having a similar issue with my scanner, but instead of using a different PC, I just run a virtual machine in order to use it.

[QUOTE=DrageMester;2654799]Compatibility is lost in the other direction too; 16-bit Windows applications don’t run on Windows 7/8 (except using a virtual machine)[/QUOTE]
I think 16 bit programs should still run at least on Windows 7 - however it has to be the 32 Bit version of Windows.


#5

Having a similar issue with my scanner, but instead of using a different PC, I just run a virtual machine in order to use it.

How do I do that? I have an XP VM (Win7 Ult) so what do I do? Run XP and then plug the scanner in?


#6

[QUOTE=Liggy;2654815]I think 16 bit programs should still run at least on Windows 7 - however it has to be the 32 Bit version of Windows.[/QUOTE] OK, I guess you’re right about the 32-bit Windows 7 being able to run 16-bit applications.

I only have 64-bit Windows 7 installed on my systems, and 16-bit Windows applications are not supported… which is why I use Windows XP Mode to run those on Windows 7 Professional.


#7

I’m keeping XP because there is commercial software that has most-useful services that were not incorporated in so-called “updates”.

I also like XP’s Windows Explorer file-manager so much more than Win7’s and Win8’s - the ability to use cursor keys as precise, selectable tools is so useful and Win7 stripped that ability, forcing Mouse-Only selections.


#8

The Sony Movie Studio 12 product range is another that will not run in Windows XP. At the moment, this is not really an issue considering the v11 range is still available and currently a lot cheaper, although I wouldn’t be surprised if the v11 range is sold out everywhere within a year or even a few months.

As far as Windows 7 compatibility goes, pretty much everything I use runs fine on Windows 7.

There are two other applications I use that while work in Windows XP, run a lot better in Windows 7. One is Raw Therapee, which is RAW conversion for digital cameras. This one needs a minimum of 4GB RAM to run properly and really struggles in Windows XP due to its 3GB limitation. Another is VUMeter 1.2, which shows a realistic looking stereo VU Meter when playing audio. The older v1.1 runs in Windows XP, but doesn’t as realistic as v1.2.

One thing I do miss in Windows XP is its advanced file search feature.


#9

Another thing I miss from XP is Drag and Drop Toolbars. It was real handy to just drag a folder to the edge of the screen and make it a toolbar.


#10

I find Win 7 x64 handles 32 bit programs fairly well. I don’t think I’ve actually run into one that didn’t work yet? Which is wierd, because when I made the jump there were alot of forum posts saying it would be issue. Then it turned out not to be an issue.


#11

I have XP on an older computer & it has Windows 98SE on it also on its’ own original harddrive . If needed I use it for things that Vista won’t do on my newer computer. (Now getting old too.)
I do have Windows 7 64 on a borrowed laptop .(Long story but kind of on permanent loan.) So far I haven’t had compatibility problems with it but I haven’t installed much on it either.
On the scanner I have an old good Visioneer that only works with my 98SE.


#12

OS “compatibility” with most major software has more to do with forcing the user to buy an updated program version that it does with whether or not the program can run on an older OS. Adobe, Logitech and many others are big offenders, where the installer simply refuses to run on an older OS.

Are they in cahoots with M$ to make obsolescence a given every couple years? Methinks - yes.


#13

[QUOTE=olyteddy;2654818]How do I do that? I have an XP VM (Win7 Ult) so what do I do? Run XP and then plug the scanner in?[/QUOTE]
For the scanner I’m using Windows Virtual PC and XP Mode which should be available in all non-home versions of Windows 7. Once the VM has started and your scanner is running, you should be able to attach it to that VM from the USB menu and here you can install XP drivers and use your favourite XP scanning app.

[QUOTE=DrageMester;2654822]OK, I guess you’re right about the 32-bit Windows 7 being able to run 16-bit applications.[/QUOTE]
As far as I know it was the same even for Windows XP 64 bit version. I think I read that the CPUs only support 64 with 32 or 32 with 16 bit.

I only have 64-bit Windows 7 installed on my systems, and 16-bit Windows applications are not supported… which is why I use Windows XP Mode to run those on Windows 7 Professional.

Same here. But I think I only use XP mode for scanning now, everything else runs in VMWare machines.


#14

I think they prevent the installer from running on an Older OS on purpose. At some point all companies stop supporting their hardware/software.

Just because it runs on windows 7 doesn’t guarantee it’ll work on XP (or vice versa). They probably don’t want to shell out for beta testing it on older OS’s. They also don’t want to put out a buggy driver (or software) so they restrict it to the OS’s they tested it out on.

It’s the same reason why corporations don’t want to upgrade from XP. All of their internal programs/software are designed for XP. They know they work on XP. They really don’t want to have to shell out to start testing them under 7.


#15

[QUOTE=ChristineBCW;2654830]I’m keeping XP because there is commercial software that has most-useful services that were not incorporated in so-called “updates”.

I also like XP’s Windows Explorer file-manager so much more than Win7’s and Win8’s - the ability to use cursor keys as precise, selectable tools is so useful and Win7 stripped that ability, forcing Mouse-Only selections.[/QUOTE]

You should try Directory Opus as a Windows Explorer replacement. It leaves any version of Explorer in the dust. IMO, this is one of the best additions you can make for Windows and one that you will make use of each day. The history of the program dates back to the Commodore Amiga. The developers have been perfecting file and folder management for decades.


#16

I’ll probably stick with ZTree actually. I need a good file manager that doesn’t HELP me screw things up, like Win7-8’s does. I’m so used to using my cursor keys to move up and down a displayed Directory Tree, and when I stop on any folder, I expect THAT one to be “selected”. Not one that I moved from, minutes earlier. But that was selected by a Mouse Click, so Win7-8 believe keyboards and cursors are worthless.

All that talk about “using keyboards” in Win8, too. Grrr…


#17

ZTree makes me feel like I’ve gone back to DOS or I’m configuring a motherboard BIOS. I don’t mind it but I can organize everything more quickly in a Windows environment using Opus because of its seemingly endless array of customizations.
Whatever floats your boat though :slight_smile:


#18

This is an evolution… soon the x86/x64 will give way to x128 (or 172?-- x86 * 2)… in windows 8… though you can expect backward compatability through emulation…