Slower Wifi during Christmas? It’s the Christmas fairy lights!

vbimport

#1

We’ve just posted the following news: Slower Wifi during Christmas? It’s the Christmas fairy lights![newsimage]http://static.myce.com//images_posts/2015/12/Manning_Close_Christmas_Light_ShowWells_Somerset_England-95x75.png[/newsimage]

Around Christmas Wifi networks might be slower than usual, UK telecom authority Ofcom warns. Wifi shares its spectrum with microwaves, baby monitors and also Christmas lights which causes interference.

            Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/slower-wifi-during-christmas-its-the-christmas-fairy-lights-77943/](http://www.myce.com/news/slower-wifi-during-christmas-its-the-christmas-fairy-lights-77943/)

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#2

Wow, that’s a new one on me!

It makes sense although I’d never have thought of the Christmas tree lights though. :slight_smile:

[B]Wombler[/B]


#3

Unfortunately most of us have older items that only work on 2.4GHz and NOT 5GHz. So dull really in saying to switch as I get lower Wireless internet with the 5GHz.


#4

This reminds me of a similar issue I read about 10 years ago where blinker bulbs and mechanical units in some mains powered fairly light strings use to interrupt DSL connections.

So if anyone has an old set of blinking tree lights and the Internet keeps dropping out, it might be worth switching off the lights to see if that helps. If it’s the neighbours tree lights, then that may be a slight problem… :doh:


#5

I wonder if this would be more, or less, of a problem with the more modern LED lights?

[B]Wombler[/B]


#6

With the older blinker bulb sets, the blinker bulb had a bimetallic strip inside the bulb where the heat of the filament caused this to bend and disconnect the power supply and vice versa when the strip cooled down. As the traditional bulb sets were wired in series directly from the mains supply, the blinker bulb was switching on/off at the full mains voltage to the rest of the bulbs in series. If the strip happened to trigger near the top or button of the AC cycle, this would cause an arc within the bulb, which emits a fair amount of electromagnetic interference for the remaining part of the AC cycle.

Normally a brief 1/100th second arc is unlikely to cause an issue such as with switching on/off a light switch. However with let’s say one of the older deluxe 160 bulb sets with four blinker bulbs all randomly flashing on/off once or twice a second, then that’s of electromagnetic interference spikes which can potentially overwhelm a DSL router, particularly those operating quite far from the exchange with a poor signal to noise ratio.

This shouldn’t be an issue LED bulbs as these are mainly electronically controlled and generally have RFI suppression to prevent the interference from affecting the unit’s own circuitry. With more recent mains powered bulb sets, the electronics switch off the bulbs half-way between the AC cycle (e.g. with a triac) so no arc occurs and thus much less electromagnetic interference.


#7

Don’t use any of the old type mains driven fairy lights, they apart from anything else are really dangerous. Think about it loads of bulbs connected to the mains in series to soak up the voltage with no isolation, MADNESS!!! My Father years ago was changing a bulb and because the potential between each holder and earth is still 230 volts here in the UK, he got a very nasty belt from the holder that came loose from the plastic flower shaped thing.

Wow, we didn’t need fairy lights after that, the air air was blue and red for a while because of the stream of foul language coming out of my old man’s mouth! Oooo, I never heard words like that before then.

there are so many low voltage LED light sets around these days and they are cheap. Throw away the old mains ones and stay safe, have as many multiple colours as you like chasing, blinking and any random pattern you can think of all without upsetting your router signal.

Please avoid the very cheap market and dubious on line places as the PSU’s can catch fire. Or if you insist on using your old mains set, bypass the flasher and blink your eyes every second. :bigsmile:


#8

My WIFI is 5GHZ band and nothing interferes with that one!
I watch Netflix (wireless) in 1080HD no problems…


#9

[QUOTE=Seán;2764368]With the older blinker bulb sets, the blinker bulb had a bimetallic strip inside the bulb where the heat of the filament caused this to bend and disconnect the power supply and vice versa when the strip cooled down. As the traditional bulb sets were wired in series directly from the mains supply, the blinker bulb was switching on/off at the full mains voltage to the rest of the bulbs in series. If the strip happened to trigger near the top or button of the AC cycle, this would cause an arc within the bulb, which emits a fair amount of electromagnetic interference for the remaining part of the AC cycle.

Normally a brief 1/100th second arc is unlikely to cause an issue such as with switching on/off a light switch. However with let’s say one of the older deluxe 160 bulb sets with four blinker bulbs all randomly flashing on/off once or twice a second, then that’s of electromagnetic interference spikes which can potentially overwhelm a DSL router, particularly those operating quite far from the exchange with a poor signal to noise ratio.

This shouldn’t be an issue LED bulbs as these are mainly electronically controlled and generally have RFI suppression to prevent the interference from affecting the unit’s own circuitry. With more recent mains powered bulb sets, the electronics switch off the bulbs half-way between the AC cycle (e.g. with a triac) so no arc occurs and thus much less electromagnetic interference.[/QUOTE]

Thanks Seán! :bow:

It amazes me at times the amount of stuff you know. :slight_smile:

[B]Wombler[/B]


#10

Assuming your outers have 5 Ghz technology, the 5ghz signal might not be too useful. Although 5 Ghz is less prone to interference, it is more prone to obstacles like walls, since high-frequency signals have more trouble passing through walls than low-frequency signals. So, if you have multiple rooms between you and your router, you might have no choice but to use the 2.4 band. I don’t have a 5 Ghz router, so I can’t confirm how well 5 Ghz signals traverse said obstacles. However, I’m guessing that most newer routers support both bands simultaneously.