Should i BUY 1TB hDd

My current computer configuration is:

[B]1X40GB SAMSUNG IDE HDD
1X160GB WDC SATA HDD
1GB RAM
AMD ATHLON 3000+
NVIDIA 7100GS
ASUS M2N-MX MOTHERBOARD

Now i want to buy a 1TB Hard Disk, removing the 2 hard-disks which i have.

SO with this configurations i have can i use 1TB Hard-Disk in my System without any problems ???

[/B][LEFT]& pls. tell me which is the best company for 1TB HDD
i m looking in terms of SPEED & PERFOMANCE
[/LEFT]

There are single platter 500GB drives out that perform very well. This means that there are also two platter 1TB drives too. I would recommend one of these. I know Seagate and Samsung have them and there might be others. I recently bought a single platter 500GB Seagate HD (7200.12) and it peaks at ~130 MB/sec and averages around 105 MB/sec. I can’t speak for its longevity at this point. The reason for getting the newer high density drives is the increased density of the platters allows for faster read/write performance.

i m asking that can i use 1TB hDd without any problems in my computer ???
With this system configurations ??

You should not see any configuration issues.

I would however recommend leaving your os on the 40gb or 160gb, or on a second partition.

If you have loaded your single partition 1tb drive with movies games songs and your os and then you get a catastrophic error causing os failure your stuck. You will need to backup all you things to another tb drive, that means purchasing another, and you will need a working computer to do so. Then after you figured out how to save your data you can reinstall the os.

Just be careful where you stick tons of data, and remember drives can fail unexpectedly. :wink:

If you do decide to use separate devices for your OS and data remember windows likes the FAT file systems. On a FAT drive you will get really upset when you have 500 GB used and you attempt to copy a 4.5gb 720p copy of a movie, or 1080p move at 8gb. The fat file system has a file size limit of 4GB minus 1 byte. This means again time to purchase another drive and backup your data to format the FAT device. NTFS for windows is capable of handling much larger files under the format manager use just select NTFS as your file system.

I would however recommend leaving your os on the 40gb or 160gb, or on a second partition. :iagree:

If you have loaded your single partition 1tb drive with movies games songs and your os and then you get a catastrophic error causing os failure your stuck. :frowning: You will need to backup all you things to another tb drive, that means purchasing another, and you will need a working computer to do so. Then after you figured out how to save your data you can reinstall the os.

That would be my recommendation also.

But yes it will work.

Thank u all for your reply.
i HAVE BOUGHT a NEW [B]WDC 500GB SATA HdD[/B]

[QUOTE=dharmil007;2424258]Thank u all for your reply.
i HAVE BOUGHT a NEW [B]WDC 500GB SATA HdD[/B][/QUOTE]

With the prices now day it would been better going 1TB WD…that what I have and it works great… 5 year warranty… But it looks like your motherboard should be able to even handle a 2TB HDD as well. Combining all those drives data and files onto one drive is the way to go not forseening any problems being on a single drive. But it does free up space in your computer though. I know cause with a single large GPU taking up the space and space where the HDD would stick out near the motherboard I had to relocate the HDD of which I was lucky for my 1TB that I bought gave me more room to move stuff around. But as the others have mentioned I do keep my O/S on my 60GB HDD so if it goes it doesn’t take out my other precious data and videos on my other HDD. I learned all this from trial and errors.

[QUOTE=coolcolors;2424346]With the prices now day it would been better going 1TB WD…that what I have and it works great… 5 year warranty… But it looks like your motherboard should be able to even handle a 2TB HDD as well. Combining all those drives data and files onto one drive is the way to go not forseening any problems being on a single drive. But it does free up space in your computer though. I know cause with a single large GPU taking up the space and space where the HDD would stick out near the motherboard I had to relocate the HDD of which I was lucky for my 1TB that I bought gave me more room to move stuff around. But as the others have mentioned I do keep my O/S on my 60GB HDD so if it goes it doesn’t take out my other precious data and videos on my other HDD. I learned all this from trial and errors.[/QUOTE]

Be careful when buying the current SATA 2TB hard drives. Most of those now spin at less than 6000 RPM versus 7200 RPM for the lower-capacity drives. (I’ve been to Best Buy many times to discover that the Seagate Barracuda 2TB SATA hard drive spins at only 5900 RPM as opposed to the 7200 RPM used by the 1.5TB and smaller Barracuda drives.) And the WD Caviar Green series drives now use mostly 5400 RPM spindles irrespective of their capacity.

Hitachi just announced a new 2TB drive, which does run at 7200RPM. I can’t recall seeing anyone else that runs at that speed (like RJL65 pointed out, they’re usually slower than that).

[QUOTE=RJL65;2424524]Be careful when buying the current SATA 2TB hard drives. Most of those now spin at less than 6000 RPM versus 7200 RPM for the lower-capacity drives. (I’ve been to Best Buy many times to discover that the Seagate Barracuda 2TB SATA hard drive spins at only 5900 RPM as opposed to the 7200 RPM used by the 1.5TB and smaller Barracuda drives.) And the WD Caviar Green series drives now use mostly 5400 RPM spindles irrespective of their capacity.[/QUOTE]

[QUOTE=Aramchek;2424704]Hitachi just announced a new 2TB drive, which does run at 7200RPM. I can’t recall seeing anyone else that runs at that speed (like RJL65 pointed out, they’re usually slower than that).[/QUOTE]

More recently, both WD and Seagate introduced new 2TB drives which do spin at 7200 RPM (called the Caviar Black and the Barracuda XT, respectively, both with 64MB of buffer memory–and the Seagate also features a new SATA III interface with a burst transfer rate of 6 Gbps). But at their current street prices, they are significantly more expensive per GB than their 1TB brandmates in the same series, as well as significantly more expensive than their slower, sub-6000 RPM brandmates.

I did mention that WD offers a line of 5400 RPM class drives (Caviar Green) in a wide range of capacities from 500GB to 2TB (it should be noted that the Caviar Green’s true spindle speed is only 5405 RPM, WD’s “variable speed” or “smart speed” claims notwithstanding). Now, Seagate has applied the 5900 RPM spindle speed first used in its initial 2TB drive to its Barracuda LP line of hard drives, which range from 1TB to 2TB (including a 1.5TB model). The current Barracuda 7200.11 1.5TB drive is being phased out of production with no direct replacement; the Barracuda 7200.12 series drives currently max out at 1TB. The 7200 RPM 1.5TB drive’s most likely replacement will be a drive in the significantly more expensive Barracuda XT line.