Short lives of DVD-R

I’ve been burning DVD-R for about 2 years now and most of them start behaving badly after 3 months.
First my standalone start having problems reading them, then my computer, then they’re simply not readable anymore.

I’ve read a very disturbing post about chemical problem with CD-R and DVD-R :
http://palimpsest.stanford.edu/byform/mailing-lists/amia-l/2000/03/msg00126.html

Is it just me?

One year ago i burned two dvd-r with all my backup stuff. Since then i have hardly used them as it is only a backup, and the stuff i actually is stored on the hdd.

3 months ago i tried to copy all the data to my hdd and found that one of the discs would not read. Multiple DVD readers using Microsoft and Linux all said that it could not find the disc. The drive whirs up, down and multiple frequencies can be heard from the drive as it attempts to sync.

The other disc worked and i hurriedly moved all the data off without problems. Three months later i am still trying to recover the data from that disc.

Today i placed the other disc in the drive (that worked 2 months ago) and found that it has EXACTLY THE SAME PROBLEM.

The discs are perfectly clean from dust and scratches so it is mind boggling.

I have tried bad copy pro and cd roller to recover without success.

THe original dvd’s were burned with nero.

marty

Originally posted by vbishop
[B]I’ve been burning DVD-R for about 2 years now and most of them start behaving badly after 3 months.
First my standalone start having problems reading them, then my computer, then they’re simply not readable anymore.

I’ve read a very disturbing post about chemical problem with CD-R and DVD-R :
http://palimpsest.stanford.edu/byform/mailing-lists/amia-l/2000/03/msg00126.html

Is it just me? [/B]

Dust and scratchs aside…

Were the discs labled? Sticky lables “actually the adhesive used” are known to cause trouble. Sharpie markers are also reported to be lest then Ideal labelling tools…:slight_smile:

It’s a crap shoot for me…I’ve got burned media several years old “CDR stuff” that reads fine…also have stuff that “mysteriously erased itself a few months after burn”

Think theres more to this than just the discs decay properly stored…

this is not news, optical discs have been doing this since they were invented. Especially cheap ones.
Another reason to use only top-quality media for archiving.

Thanks for the suggestion, but it did not have any labels.

I too find it hard to believe that it is ‘just decay’. I thought at first i must have killed the first one trying to clean it with all kinds of lens cleaners and spirits. But now the second one has died, and i have never made any attempts on cleaning it.

Originally posted by ZigZagMan
[B]Dust and scratchs aside…

Were the discs labled? Sticky lables “actually the adhesive used” are known to cause trouble. Sharpie markers are also reported to be lest then Ideal labelling tools…:slight_smile:

It’s a crap shoot for me…I’ve got burned media several years old “CDR stuff” that reads fine…also have stuff that “mysteriously erased itself a few months after burn”

Think theres more to this than just the discs decay properly stored… [/B]

Persnally, and this goes into the quality of media topic I suspect, I think the weld has alot to do with it.

Burnable media is a sandwich, 2 pieces of plasic sandiching a film of light sensitive film to simulate pressed media. These 2 outer layers are sonically weled together at the factory and shipped for our use. I wouldn’t be surprised at all to find if a weld fails…the goo on the film can gass out…disk expires as unreadable.

granted…thats one of alot of factors…but reasonable to me…:slight_smile:

Thank you for at least confirming the worst. Don’t buy cheap media. They can fail rapidly even when stored in a good environment. Now I can grieve properly…:sad:

Seriously though, if anyone has any ideas, i am all ears.

thanks guys:)

That article is making me consider cancelling my DVD-R Maxell order and going for DVD+R Maxells. I understand that quality may play a huge role and Maxells are great. Also the article was posted over 3 years ago. Still, can there be truth to what he’s saying even today? And is he implying that DVD+Rs all things equal should last longer (they weren’t even around at the time of the article)?

technology evolves…the trick is to stay current…:slight_smile:

The format of the disc is far less important than the quality of the disc. There are equally bad examples of each type, and equally good ones. If there were no TY DVD+R, I would use TY DVD-R before I would use any of the other DVD+R brands.