Share something from your childhood

vbimport

#1

Dare share a true story from your childhood ?. :smiley:

I grew up in Kansas City Mo and lived with my great grandmother who had a two story house with eight bedrooms located on 34th & Vine, in the mid 1930’s she turned her house into a Brothel-> Whorehouse which she was the Madam until the early 1960’s.

Needless to say my female cousin and I was always watched like a hawk and was never left alone for a minute :frowning: , she also ran a still down in her cellar that apparently produced high quality hooch or better known as white lighting.

SJ :cool:


#2

That’s pretty hard to beat stormy I was raised by my ma in the outskirts of Detroit ,Mi.,A lot of small lakes with cabin / houses,my dad was a truck driver and when he was home he was drunk as a skunk.That’s if he came home ,most of the time he would be gone all weekend and come home when his pay check was gone.I very made it through high school and got drafted,I came home for a surprise leave and found the oldman sitting with a rifle ,my rifle,waiting to shoot my ma because she had enough of his crap and left him.
Talked him out of it and he quit drinking and ma came back.so it went .


#3

Hey marloyd thanks for posting :cool:

Yours is not bad either we don’t have to try and out do one another :disagree:

I figure this would be a good way for us all to get to know each other, our childhood is what made who and what we are today :iagree:

We all remember things from our childhood some good and some not so good and with the amount of members we have I think there will be some very interesting reading here, it may even bring some of us closer together as friends, not that most of us are not already friends rather there is always room for more. :cool:

I did post everything in a nutshell so I will be posting more on my childhood, hopefully we’ll get to hear more on yours too. :bigsmile:


#4

My childhood is not so colorful as SJ’s as far as who I was raised by.
I was born here in Amarillo ,Texas & I’ve always lived in this area mostly Amarillo .
Both my parents were also born in the Texas Panhandle & even one of my grandmothers was . I think she was born in 1899 .
I was raised by my parents who were married for 35 years till my dad died. I was also close to one of my sets of grandparents & raised to some extent by them . My parents like to drop us kids off on the weekends & do their own thing.
I can say although I got spanked when I was caught doing something that deserved it .
I wasn’t that well supervised & didn’t get caught that much . My brother & I along with other neighborhood friends would sometimes be gone all day on our bikes . Maybe checking in for lunch & sometimes not. This was from the time we could ride about 6 for me. I can say I never had anyone approach me & try to kidnap me but I consider myself lucky to have survived till I was an adult. Can you imagine parents these days letting a 6 year old go off all day on his bike ?
I didn’t have a rifle at my house but me & a cousin that did were allowed to go hunting by ourselves with his 22 . This started at 6 also. My mom didn’t want guns in the house so my dad accommodated . However a BB gun was allowed & I got my first at 8 . I got careless & shot a hole in a window at my grandparents wit it & got it taken away for three months. That should be a good start.


#5

I was born and raised in London and my folks had a greenhouse in our small yard. Looking at that house years later, I realize the greenhouse was a greenhut, instead, but about age 4 or 5, I saw the Hammer film FIRST MEN IN THE MOON with Lionel Jeffries as Prof Cavor, who builds a sphere, paints it with some anti-grav formula. In his greenhouse. And then exposes those panels to the Earth and flies to the moon.

About this time, my parents bought a new refrigerator and I begged and pleaded to inherit that massive cardboard box, and the haulers were kind enough to store it outside, in our greenhouse. I then proceeded to mix all the soaps, turpentines, paint, insectides, dirt, clays and anything else into various pots, and I would paint my cardboard moon-ship, hoping one of those formulas would take me and a biscuit tin or two, float us thru the skylights, off to the moon.

Mother spent those next two years fussing about my paint-stained clothes, paint-thinner-smelling hair, hands that were perma-stained but despite their logical arguments against my Moon trip, they still never stopped me. “Who’s going to pay for the broken glass if you get away?” was my father’s normal closing to each set of diatribes.

As grandparents, my folks have paid me back with all the same kindness, allowing our two kids to dream of moon trips and sailing around Saturn, etc. And I’m glad to hear that we’ve now found a 5th moon around Pluto. It HAS to be called a planet NOW. Those silly scientists. I knew it was back in a small London greenhut!


#6

Not a bad start there Cholla :clap:

You opened up a few memories for me, my brain is ticking now :eek:


#7

ChristineBCW Good start.
My grandparents had a greenhouse. Larger than a hut I think it was 16 X 22 feet.
Not large but it could handle a lot of plants. They were avid gardeners & this got vegetables off to an early start for transplanting to the garden.
The refrigerator box brought this memory back . I guess I didn’t think about how lucky I was . My dad was an appliance repairman . He was always bringing appliance boxes home for us kids. My favorites were washer & dryer boxes. These made usable tanks .
By that I mean take off the top & bottom & a kid or two could crawl power it around the yard . The box would work like a tank track & got better with use until it wore out.


#8

Hey ChristineBCW

I see you was a very mischievous child :eek:

So was I :iagree: I remember when my mother was at work at the bar she owned I took the fire extinguisher (powder) and chased my brothers and sisters all over the house (Two story) spraying them :eek: boy what a mess, needless to say J got it good when she got home. :sad: :bigsmile:

BTW…There was 7 of us kids, which I had 2 brothers and 4 sisters me being the second oldest.


#9

Cholla, we’re cutting thru Yellow-land next week on our trek to BC. I think we’ll leave Austin about 9 or 10 pm, hit Lubbock in the wee-hours, then cross I-40 for breaky, maybe. Maybe our caravan will be interested at that hour. Then, off towards Dalhart and I-25 north.

Last time thru, we ran into wee-hours construction on I-40 and were stalled for a half-an-hour before reaching some city-street exit and headed north to find 1061 Tascosa. We’d love to avoid that stall - do you know if 40’s got any construction on it around that I-27 intersection?


#10

Storm, and exactly how many fire-extinguishers have you gone thru in your life? Was it a lesson learned or were they more fun anyway?!! And do your siblings recall this episode with any extra fervor because of your mom’s reaction? Very funny!


#11

Well Christine I can’t recall ever touching a fire extinguisher after that, my mother used a switch off the willow tree from the front yard on my rear end boy did I have welts for days :frowning: my brothers and sister had big grins on their faces the whole time. :a


#12

@ ChristineBCW , We always have some construction during the summer . I don’t think there is anything major . Last year they had some major construction/repair going on there.
I take it you’re coming into Amarillo via I-27 .
Take the Interchange to I-40 W from I-27 S. Take off on Bell ST. N .
Keep on it till you get to the 1061 turnoff . AKA Boy’s Ranch Road & Tascossa.
Stay on it till you get to state hiway 385 NW that should take you into Dalhart .
If you decide to stay in Amarillo for a day you might want to go to Palo Duro Canyon State Park . If that is your sort of thing . Take picnic supplies although there are concessions in the canyon . Expensive though.

BTW SJ my grandparents had a weeping willow tree & I know exactly what those welts are from personal experience.


#13

I was born and raised in one of the world’s most politically-minded cities, Gwangju in 1973, or early 1974 in the Western calendar. Meat was rare, but even rarer was rational thinking. But there was at least the black-and-white TV on which I could sometimes watch Japanese animations without knowing they were actually produced in Japan. They somehow taught me to think the world is one and active participations and efforts to make things better can ultimately help bring prosperity and peace for all.

Later in the mid-1980s, I realized things were not so bright in the time and space within the reach of my conscience and presence. It looked as if I were destined only to become a terrorist. The ROK government since the mass killings and assinations in the late 1940s and throughout 1950s (before and after the Korean War, that is) tried desperately to monopolize arms and army. Like the post-Meiji Japan, civilians were not allowed to own and carry swords or rifles.

Rapid industrialization helped the nation to be affluent and arrogant. The turning point was somewhere around the 1986 Seoul Asian Games and 1988 Seoul Olympic Games. Koreans had to decide whether Korea’s an Americanized Western nation with yellow faces, awkward pronunciations, and black hair, or a backward one resisting every globalization while accepting money from other countries. Politics, economy, media, entertainment, even sports, all things were changing at once and I predicted implosion within my lifetime. That ended my childhood that never was.


#14

It’s hard for me to share something about my childhood, mostly because I don’t remember all that much at the moment. I’ll just choose a thread and see what memories are along the way.

As a kid, I do remember books. Lots of books. By the time I was in grade 4, my elementary school had a program called Accelerated Reader. We read books, got points, and kept a tally. At the end of the year, the person with the most points in the school got a grand prize, second place got a different prize, etc.

In grade 4, I read like no other. And won that year. I was most excited over the money we got. Something like 50 or 100 dollars. One hundred whole dollars! I was super psyched. Grade 5 saw me participate in the same contest, coming second to a 4th grader. I was a little upset–back then I was probably absolutely gutted–but I did admit that anyone who put tha touch effort into the program deserved to win. I was happy to stand in second place to him after all was said and done.

I guess that gets to another point about my childhood. I was raised with parents who were happy to spoil me. But I wasn’t spoiled rotten, and I didn’t feel overly entitled to just anything and everything. My parents had gotten me into preschool (don’t remember this time period), then K4 & K5 (kindergarten for kids who are 4, then the next year for kids who are 5) at a private Catholic establishment (we aren’t practicing members of the Catholic faith; if anything, my family is pretty Baptist)…

I was getting to experience differences between people at a young age. I remember going to Mass, thinking it was just like church, and being just as bored there as at church. We were kids; it was expected. But I didn’t scoff at anything, and I’m kinda thankful for it. The next year, I switched to public school. First grade at age 6. It was a big difference. Kids were a little more rough around the edges, but eventually most folks seemed to like me. Plus, there were no more uniforms. :bigsmile:

And in public school I remained, with surprisingly few problems, and I learned a LOT of kids had my back. One girl teased me in grade 2, maybe. We were in gym class, and half the group chastised her, the other came to comfort me. I didn’t realize it then, but that would be a theme that continues to this very day. I still don’t understand how it’s possible, but hey, it made for a nice childhood. :slight_smile:


#15

When i was around 8 my dad bought a computer. A ZX Spectrum. (Laugh all you want, back then it was completely new technology for the masses). It came with BASIC and a manual even bigger than the device itself.

I asked for weeks to play with it. My father gave me the manual and said i needed to read it first before touching the computer. I looked at it and threw it away. I told him i’d find out everything myself, which i did. It didn’t take long before i could do things on that machine my dad never dreamed of. I saved more than a year of savings to buy a device (the Multifcace One) that would alllow me for real-time tinkering with it. This was a machine i could master and i was determined to control it to the max.

It was a strange time. I went to computer clubs and parties where i was one of the youngest persons around. Copying everything i could, purchasing everything, learing everything there was.

In the beginning of the pc era i ran my own Bulletin Board System, totally automatic, finding out everything by myself. I was not allowed an own phone line, but bought one anyway. My father was very glad when i moved out. The electricity bill dropped immensly.

Now i may be old(er) (i still want to be an 8 year old as much as possible for the rest of my life!) and have my own family, but the urge to get the max bang out of the minimal technology has never faded. I update very old gps systems for new use. I make smooth file servers out of systems people think are way too old to serve any purpose. I learned how not to pay full price for hardware. I don’t usually have to pay for software or get it at complete bargain prices.

I may be a Windows 2008 R2 Certified Systems Administrator now, but i’d love to tinker with old hardware each and every day if it paid well. :slight_smile:

Oh and do remember this: Everything you learn by yourself because you have passion for it, will stay with you forever. Everything other method of education is worthless in comparison.


#16

[QUOTE=Albert;2643113]…

As a kid, I do remember books. Lots of books. By the time I was in grade 4, my elementary school had a program called Accelerated Reader. We read books, got points, and kept a tally. At the end of the year, the person with the most points in the school got a grand prize, second place got a different prize, etc.

…[/QUOTE]

I once created a thread on this forum about the spread of intelligence, but books are rarely distributed equally and evenly. The Digital Divide may be the worst and single most critical factor in today’s politics and society in general, but it’s easier to make every child own and use an OLPC laptop or an iPad, preferably the third-generation one, or even a $199 Nexus 7 (about which I’ve just written a briefing quoting WSJ and IHS iSuppli) than to build a library to help each child grow to become a Thomas Jefferson or Alex de Tocqueville. So far, the vast and costly efforts to equip households and individuals, schools and governments have focused on forcing people to stop and disable reading to think and thinking to read. Books were luxury beyond dreaming. Schools and classes ordered students to donate books, but those were pathetic, useless. Today’s children cannot dare complain the unavailability of books since an iPad (for the richest children) or a nearly free smartphone (for the rest of the billions of children) easily allows anyone in China or India to access iBooks Store, or the equivalent ones of Amazon and Google and Microsoft (and someday, Baidoo and Samsung, too.) But even given the even and equal spread of both intelligence and the means to obtain information, the gaps still exist.

So I’m reading the kind of books I should have read at 5 or 8. Poland and Centennial by James A. Michener, The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich by William L. Shirer (2nd reading, eBook only, lost the paperback I once had), Texas (6th or 7th) and Mexico (2nd) also by Michener. It wasn’t easy to find those books in the 1990s, but there are now several Amazon-like sites and BN-like bookstores delivering some - perhaps still much less than 1% of those available at Amazon and BN - books from the US or the UK to homes in Seoul and even in Gwangju.


#17

Hi Kenshin

Sorry for the late reply:flower:

I had to go shopping so I can feed the face :bigsmile:

Nice to hear from you, thank you for posting :clap:

I hear you on the “Politically-minded cities, states and/or countries” I can’t really get into such discussion due to the fact I am a staff member here at MyCE forum and it would be improper because the forum is a worldwide community, however I do believe no matter what your social ethic background or upbringing is everyone as a mind of their own and should be able to choose for themselves whats right and wrong going by their own judgment and not what is dictated to them.


#18

[QUOTE=Kenshin;2643136]So I’m reading the kind of books I should have read at 5 or 8. Poland and Centennial by James A. Michnener, The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich by William L. Shirer (2nd reading, eBook only, lost the paperback I once had), Texas (6th or 7th) and Mexico (2nd) also by Michener. It wasn’t easy to find those books in the 1990s, but there are now several Amazon-like sites and BN-like bookstores delivering some - perhaps still much less than 1% of those available at Amazon and BN - books from the US or the UK to homes in Seoul and even in Gwangju.[/QUOTE]

I’m only hoping that, with the books available, you enjoy them as much as I enjoyed them. Honesty, that kind of contest I mentioned burned me out on books, but taught me how I appreciate them at the same time.

Reading books for a class in high school was never easy for me; the teachers didn’t want me to read into the book and get my own ideas. Instead, everything was standardized. Free thinking wasn’t highly available, and there was no further encouragement from school to continue reading outside material in my own free time (what free time there was). So I grew to detest reading in general.

Now in college/university, I have taken English classes that reminded me of my true joy from reading. I also remember how painful it is to get to the end of a book, only for that pain to be replaced by an imagination surging with ideas on how the book plays out.

Imagination…I suppose that’s where my joy of reading comes from. History books, encyclopedias…it seems the content can be mostly nonfiction, but whatever’s presented has to engage my imagination in a positive manner. Otherwise, I find it too dry to keep my (admittedly simple) mind buzzing with ideas.


#19

[QUOTE=Albert;2643145]…

Reading books for a class in high school was never easy for me; the teachers didn’t want me to read into the book and get my own ideas. Instead, everything was standardized. Free thinking wasn’t highly available, and there was no further encouragement from school to continue reading outside material in my own free time (what free time there was). So I grew to detest reading in general.

…[/QUOTE]

That sounds like the kind of standardization South Korean government and schools have so successfully done even Obama, the leader of a country to which South Korea sends more than 100,000 students in a year to learn at places from the worst community colleges and 6-month language courses to Harvard and Stanford, pays lip service on how to learn from South Korea’s example. My major at college was English and surely I had to study ‘American Literature’ and ‘British Literature’, but none of the books, novels, poems, authors, or the ideas and interpretations and purposes of the professors impressed me. TTC lectures were much better though they remain largely introductory.

One thing oppression (not the kind of oppression of present day Syria and Egypt on news headlines about the fashionable Arab Spring) and poverty (again not the kind of poverty of South Sudan in 2011 or North Korea in 1996) helped was that a quite alienated child left alone can learn to learn without books that other classmates have. As with Mr. B’s case, sometimes adults and teachers don’t exactly know how children and students, or babies and infants for that matter, can learn or should learn without the aid of manuals and official curricula.


#20

Hey Mr. Belvedere

I’m like you I believe the best teaching one can get is by hands on experience works best :iagree:

As a teenager I wanted a go-cart and my uncle told me if I get my hands on a engine for it he would weld a frame together for me, so I tore apart a old lawn-mower we had in the shed, it took a little jerry-rigging here and there but did get it built.

Course I didn’t have it to long though because the police confiscated it because I refused to stay off the streets. :rolleyes: