Selling CD’s, which burner and CD-R media should I get?

I think the most important aspects when making CD for selling is that they should compatible with as many different CD players as possible and also be endurable.
I normally try to do research myself but I felt a little overwhelmed by all information.

So can some give me advice on a burner and CD-R discs or at least point me in the right direction?
Thanks

[QUOTE=Cactus634;2663982]I think the most important aspects when making CD for selling is that they should compatible with as many different CD players as possible and also be endurable.
I normally try to do research myself but I felt a little overwhelmed by all information.

So can some give me advice on a burner and CD-R discs or at least point me in the right direction?
Thanks[/QUOTE]
Your strategy is correct. Choose a CD-R that will yield high quality burns that will be readable by the widest range of players. Taiyo Yuden or Falcon CD-Rs are at the top of my list for the kind of quality that will leave you with satisfied customers. Diamond CD-Rs give you the most impressive looking product to offer. I use Falcon diamonds exclusively for several years now for distribution CDs with great burn quality and no problems.

What print surface do you need for the material you will be selling?

What kind of computer/system will you be using for burning? Will you want IDE or SATA burner?

Thanks, I think I will go with Flacon Diamonds CD’s then. I found a dealer in Europe http://www.dvdshoponline.co.uk/P5233.html
I will go with White Printable surface since I’ll be writing directly on the CD’s with my Printer.

My computer system is a PC with win7. I have one IDE and several SATA slots free. I’m open to any suggestions about burners. Quality is the main priority, speed and price is less important. It’s a plus if they also are good at DVD burning, but maybe it’s necessary to have different burners for DVD’s and CD’s in order reach greater quality?

[QUOTE=Cactus634;2664142]Thanks, I think I will go with Flacon Diamonds CD’s then. I found a dealer in Europe http://www.dvdshoponline.co.uk/P5233.html
I will go with White Printable surface since I’ll be writing directly on the CD’s with my Printer.

My computer system is a PC with win7. I have one IDE and several SATA slots free. I’m open to any suggestions about burners. Quality is the main priority, speed and price is less important. It’s a plus if they also are good at DVD burning, but maybe it’s necessary to have different burners for DVD’s and CD’s in order reach greater quality?[/QUOTE]

If you are using an inkjet printer, the discs that you linked to are not inkjet compatible. You will need the Smart White printable, which is the best looking matte(not glossy) printable available, or the Smart Guard glossy waterproof printables. Which printer are you using?

I see there are plenty of Optiarc AD7200S burners available at Ebay UK. That has been and continues to be the most reliable top-notch CD and DVD burner for me. I keep a stock of them ready to replace any that wear out. That one is the SATA model. The AD7200A is the IDE version of that drive.

Another member posted some very good prices for Falcons here. They burn well at 16x-32x.

Some info on the print surfaces.

Smart white

Smart Guard

And the Diamond recording surface. More info can be found by clicking on the “Data sheet” link.

You are right about the surface.
I will probably get the AD7200S burner.
Is there any way to check the amount of compatibility a CD has by looking at software measurements.

Since you asked which printer I had: I have a Cannon iP4300 printer. If you have some recommendations about other printers, I’m interested in hearing. They cost so little anyway.

Glad you didn’t order thermal printables. They have a sealed surface and ink just puddles on top of it.

You will find that Falcon’s unique Smart White surface is about midway between a regular matte inkjet printable and a glossy. The surface is so smooth that it looks noticeably more impressive than regular inkjet. But of course, nothing is quite so impressive as a glossy if you are printing high color photo quality images.

Yes, you can get a sense of playback reliability from tests like these in the blank media forum. A disc that tests with low maximum and average error rates will usually play back more readily with even finicky players. Compare the scans of the various CD-R’s with Taiyo Yuden and TDK(Falcon), and you’ll see that they are a standout for consistently higher quality.

That Canon has a good reputation, and you should certainly give it a try first. If you are disappointed with the quality, I would recommend an Epson Artisan in the 700-800 line.

Really helpful.
Would you also recommend Falcon media pro DVD-R.

[QUOTE=Cactus634;2664321]Really helpful.
Would you also recommend Falcon media pro DVD-R.[/QUOTE]

Glad to help you get started on solid footing. I’ve also used the Falcon DVD-R pro media extensively. Never disappointed with the results. Their Silver pearl print surface is also the best silver available.

If you are new to this, I should perhaps explain the big advantage of a diamond CD-R over others for professional duplication. You have undoubtedly seen the data side of a typical CD-R after burning. A noticeable burned data area as well as the dye color tint that makes it clear that it is not a professionally mastered and stamped CD-R as you would find with a store-bought music CD. The diamond CD-R doesn’t show the distinct “burned” area and has the same uniform silver appearance as a stamped CD. It elevates the look of your product out of the “home-made” realm quite nicely and spares you the expense of having the disc professionally mastered and stamped.

Thanks.
Is there any difference between the ide and sata burner regarding write quality and can you connect several ide drives to the same ide slot without getting problems.

You mean 2 drives, master and slave? For CD burning should be fine. And likely OK for DVD at 8x. It will depend on your machine.

The differences I’ve seen between IDE and SATA 7200 are mostly small enough to attribute to manufacturing variation. How many hard drives in the machine, and are they SATA? A SATA hard drive(50% empty) will greatly improve your odds of avoiding issues w/ DVDs if you attempt simultaneous burning.