Searching: rip program that detects disc errors

vbimport

#1

I have had several situations where my DVD ripping program(s) have ripped DVDs with (seamingly) no problem. Afterwards, I had to find out that some errors (from small scratches etc.) from the DVDs where ripped and burned (results: DVDs which during playback show some freezing pixels or other errors).

Is there any program that does an error testing process during ripping of a DVD (and reports the errors, as well)?

Thanks


#2

The “freezing” during playback is not due to errors created in the files during the ripping process, but in most of cases is due to an error during the burn.

This most of times happens when using a low quality disc, and the player is not able to read the disc fast enough to guarantee a regular playback without freezing.

What discs are you burning exactly?


#3

No, what I mean is when the source disc is not in good shape.
I give an example: I copied an original disc which had a deep scratch -> nevertheless no problems during ripping.
When I watched the copied DVD-R there where some pixel errors. When I watch the original disc at the same spot there are playback errors too (because of the scratch on the original disc).

I am looking for a DVD ripping software that can “warn” me when the original is not good enough to be ripped without flaws.
A possibility to re-read difficult spots on the original disc would be good, too.

I have ripped and burned several hundred DVDs and normally all goes very well (using only Verbatim and Taiyo Yuden discs).

Anyone with more clues?


#4

Two suggestions. First have your original disk polished. Local dvd rental shops often have disk polishing machines and will do this service for a small fee.

Second, you’re lucky you got through these “bad spots” because many ripping programs will simply fail to copy these areas.

DVDDecrypter can be set to retry hard-to-read areas many times, and this sometimes works to get a good copy. Since development has stopped on DVDDecrypter, many newer protection schemes are beyond its capabilities to decrypt though, so you might want to use it in conjunction with AnyDVD. Look in the Tools–>Settings–>I/O section of DVDDecrypter to change the Read Retry amount.

I don’t know of any ripping program that will “warn” you of troublesome areas. Not until after the fact, when it gives you an I/O error.


#5

dvdfab can be set ignore read errors or to auto-retry a set number of times then ask retry/abort/ignore. this way you have control of whether or not to continue after a read error or cancel. you can also specify the amount of sectors to skip after a read error.
http://www.dvdfab.com/docs/index.php/Main/SettingsRead

.


#6

beatlegs wrote,

“I give an example: I copied an original disc which had a deep scratch -> nevertheless no problems during ripping.”

If you successfully ripped it, then I would watch the whole flick from your HDD…If no probs/issues, then it’s most likely a burning or media issue…What is your burning SW?..
maybe I missed it,but what are you ripping with?


#7

As already said [I]t0nee1[/I], if the original disc was fully ripped on HDD, then files are perfectly functional, and if you have problems when playing the burned disc in the standalone player, the issue is not in the ripped files (that I repeat doesn’t contains errors if were perfectly ripped from the original even if the original was scratched) but in the burned disc.

Even if the original is scratched but if files can be ripped anyway, then the ripped files are with no errors, so there is no need of a software that can search for errors in ripped files.

I hope that I explained clearly enough this time :flower:


#8

Nor was I suggesting [I]geno888[/I] ,that a SW be used to search for errors in a ripped file…I was only [I]asking[/I] what his ripping/burning methods were,and btw, agreeing that it’s most likely in the burning or media…:wink:


#9

I agree with you guys that a ripped dvd copies the digital information perfectly, and so it should play properly from the hard drive.

[Now playing devil’s advocate]
But what if the digital encoding on the disk is imperfect? He says the pixellation is caused by a scratch, but it is difficult to look at a scratch on a disk and know where in the movie it may affect playback. If the encoding is flawed, the copy will be also. I’ve seen this many times on home made movies/video files, but I’ll admit I’ve never seen it on a commercially made dvd. I have seen encoding so bad on commercially made movies that it appears blocky and has motion blur on fast sequences.


#10

Yeah,I have to agree…And just because the ripper finishes w/o spitting errors, does not necessarily guarantee to be a flawless rip…IMO! But in my humble experience, I’d say it’s most likely in the burning/media process,but you never know!


#11

Do you guys know EAC (“Exact Audio Copy”) from ripping a CD?

I guess I’m searching for a DVD ripping software with the same core philosophy as EAC.

And, as it seams, there is no such thing…
Or…?


#12

I forgot to answer:
I regularly use DVD Fab for my rips. Occasionally I go for PlexTools.


#13

[quote=beatlegs;2136975]Do you guys know EAC (“Exact Audio Copy”) from ripping a CD?

I guess I’m searching for a DVD ripping software with the same core philosophy as EAC.[/quote]If there’s anything for DVD ripping that is comparable to EAC in methodology and execution, I’ve never seen it. :disagree:


#14

[QUOTE=Kerry56;2136935]
[Now playing devil’s advocate]
But what if the digital encoding on the disk is imperfect? He says the pixellation is caused by a scratch, but it is difficult to look at a scratch on a disk and know where in the movie it may affect playback. If the encoding is flawed, the copy will be also. I’ve seen this many times on home made movies/video files, but I’ll admit I’ve never seen it on a commercially made dvd. I have seen encoding so bad on commercially made movies that it appears blocky and has motion blur on fast sequences.[/QUOTE]

You evil :stuck_out_tongue:

If I’m not wrong, even if the original is scratched and the standalone player is not able to recover data, generally (not always) the computer drives are able to correct errors better than standalones, so the data can be recovered safely.

If the scratch is too bad and data cannot be recovered, the drive returns a CRC error, and if the ripping software is not purposely inserting fake data on the file, then that’s impossible at all to rip the disc. But if the file can be read (even if with difficulty), then data on the HDD are error-free.

If the original disc was bad pressed, or the video is corrupted because also the original disc contains wrong data, then the only solution is to make again the movie… Who will pay again actors? :p:p:p

P.S. Sorry Kerry if I misunderstood your post :flower: