Seagate to acquire OCZ Technology?

vbimport

#1

I just posted the article Seagate to acquire OCZ Technology?.

Seagate have long said that they will enter the SSD market when the time is right, and it would seem that now is that time.
Are Seagate set to acquire OCZ Technology?

Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/seagate-to-acquire-ocz-technology-62539/](http://www.myce.com/news/seagate-to-acquire-ocz-technology-62539/)

Feel free to add your comments below. 

Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

Wow, what a surprise, I for one didnt think Seagate was that interested in SSDs. But how wrong I was. Great article Wendy.


#3

NO they did not just say the quality assurance from Seagate–is that supposed to be a joke?


#4

[QUOTE=CharmedonWB;2644622]NO they did not just say the quality assurance from Seagate–is that supposed to be a joke?[/QUOTE]
May I ask what you are implying or referring to?


#5

[QUOTE=alan1476;2644600]Wow, what a surprise, I for one didnt think Seagate was that interested in SSDs. But how wrong I was. Great article Wendy.[/QUOTE]

Alvin Toffler once said about the responses of the monopolies of certain industries when new and better technologies threaten their business. Most of them try one of the two things: kill or buy, or both. That’s what the riders of horses did when cars first appeared. That was also what Bell and AT&T faced when it was clear telephones were going to replace most markets of all preceding technologies to transmit messages over long distance. Mobile - cellular or not - companies servicing 3G-based telecommunication have tried to kill Whatsapp and Kakao Talk. But they also tried to develop their own platforms, or buy existing platforms, or offered something else to counter free messengers: VoLTE (voice over LTE), shared ‘family’ data plans, reducing or abolishing fee for sending SMS and MMS messages, etc.

The HDD industry has long denied and ridiculed at the threat of SSD. That was not only arrogant but deceiving. How could the CEO of Seagate and Western Digital be more ignorant and less insightful than the owner and reviewers of Anandtech.com? The average intelligence and intellect of major conglomerates and large businesses may not be as good as those of Stephen Hawking and Benjamin Franklin, but it cannot be that Lee Gunhee of Samsung sees his future very clearly and invests smartly whereas the CEO’s of Seagate and Western Digital, the dedicated HDD makers, and IBM and Hitachi, largest conglomerates themselves fail to do so entirely because the former is a genius and the rest idiots. The data and business intelligence reports pointing out the comign death of HDD have been available at least since around 2000.

They just didn’t say it too publicly because they cannot transform an entire factory into a semiconductor fabrication plant overnight. Their most and best supporters and loyal customers were server administrators and power users, but it was they that first tried DRAM-based and SLC NAND-based SSD’s, years before end user consumers of Apple iPad and users of home-grown PC sets started using SSD-only computers. Some were PCI cards rather than SATA/PATA drives, so the term SSD is somewhat incomplete.


#6

[QUOTE=alan1476;2644623]May I ask what you are implying or referring to?[/QUOTE]

I am referring to their quality assurance which is practically nonexistant. Explain to me quality assurance when the company constructs an external drive that reaches temperatures in excess of 60C.


#7

[QUOTE=Kenshin;2644639]Alvin Toffler once said… so the term SSD is somewhat incomplete.[/QUOTE]

Wow, you really like to type. Time to get out of the basement and find a girl, mate. I fell asleep three times reading that novel. LOL. Just kidding, Kenshin, but I do think you could have made your point in fewer words.

[QUOTE=CharmedonWB;2644675]I am referring to their quality assurance which is practically nonexistant. Explain to me quality assurance when the company constructs an external drive that reaches temperatures in excess of 60C.[/QUOTE]

What’s wrong with 60°C? You can use the SSD as storage, you can cook an egg on it, AND heat the room it’s in when it’s the middle of January. You need to let up on Seagate, man. They’re providing us with multi-functional hardware at only a slightly inflated price. God bless Seagate. God bless big corporations. </sarcasm>


#8

[QUOTE=CharmedonWB;2644675]I am referring to their quality assurance which is practically nonexistant. Explain to me quality assurance when the company constructs an external drive that reaches temperatures in excess of 60C.[/QUOTE]
If that has been your experience then you might have to make some changes, see what other SSDs temps are in your setup. But I have many OCZ SSDs and they run at very comfortable temps and I am very happy with them, OCZ is the leader in cutting edge technology, maybe you just aren’t ready for them.:flower:


#9

I’m going to get one before the end of the year, but it’ll be an Intel SSD. Just my personal preference. I’m sure OCZ has good drives, too, but Intel has a great rep for reliability.


#10

[QUOTE=Kenshin;2644639]Alvin Toffler once said about the responses of the monopolies of certain industries when new and better technologies threaten their business. Most of them try one of the two things: kill or buy, or both. That’s what the riders of horses did when cars first appeared. That was also what Bell and AT&T faced when it was clear telephones were going to replace most markets of all preceding technologies to transmit messages over long distance. Mobile - cellular or not - companies servicing 3G-based telecommunication have tried to kill Whatsapp and Kakao Talk. But they also tried to develop their own platforms, or buy existing platforms, or offered something else to counter free messengers: VoLTE (voice over LTE), shared ‘family’ data plans, reducing or abolishing fee for sending SMS and MMS messages, etc.

The HDD industry has long denied and ridiculed at the threat of SSD. That was not only arrogant but deceiving. How could the CEO of Seagate and Western Digital be more ignorant and less insightful than the owner and reviewers of Anandtech.com? The average intelligence and intellect of major conglomerates and large businesses may not be as good as those of Stephen Hawking and Benjamin Franklin, but it cannot be that Lee Gunhee of Samsung sees his future very clearly and invests smartly whereas the CEO’s of Seagate and Western Digital, the dedicated HDD makers, and IBM and Hitachi, largest conglomerates themselves fail to do so entirely because the former is a genius and the rest idiots. The data and business intelligence reports pointing out the comign death of HDD have been available at least since around 2000.

They just didn’t say it too publicly because they cannot transform an entire factory into a semiconductor fabrication plant overnight. Their most and best supporters and loyal customers were server administrators and power users, but it was they that first tried DRAM-based and SLC NAND-based SSD’s, years before end user consumers of Apple iPad and users of home-grown PC sets started using SSD-only computers. Some were PCI cards rather than SATA/PATA drives, so the term SSD is somewhat incomplete.[/QUOTE]
Hi kenny, that is a very insightful post, Its great to have you back here posting on a regular basis.:flower:


#11

[QUOTE=DukeNukem;2644712]I’m going to get one before the end of the year, but it’ll be an Intel SSD. Just my personal preference. I’m sure OCZ has good drives, too, but Intel has a great rep for reliability.[/QUOTE]
Very true, Intel has great SSDs, but I cant afford to spend over 1,000USD for 600gb SSD, when I can buy a 512gb from Crucial for 399.99. Intel has to come to terms with the fact that although their SSDs may be very good, they are not worth the premium placed on them. This is just my personal opinion though, others may very likely spend double for the Intel name brand, not me.:smiley:


#12

[QUOTE=CharmedonWB;2644675]I am referring to their quality assurance which is practically nonexistant. Explain to me quality assurance when the company constructs an external drive that reaches temperatures in excess of 60C.[/QUOTE]
Are you referring to Seagate or OCZ? I dont buy external drives so I cant really give you an opinion but they have both been in the business a very long tie and both are very successful, they must be doing something right. LOL.:bigsmile:


#13

[QUOTE=DukeNukem;2644698]

Wow, you really like to type. Time to get out of the basement and find a girl, mate. I fell asleep three times reading that novel. LOL. Just kidding, Kenshin, but I do think you could have made your point in fewer words.

[/QUOTE]

This is a forum for SSD. If you want to give advice for dating girls, go to the Living Room forum instead.

If you have nothing much to contribute, first buy some and post your benchmarks.


#14

[QUOTE=Kenshin;2644758]This is a forum for SSD. If you want to give advice for dating girls, go to the Living Room forum instead.

If you have nothing much to contribute, first buy some and post your benchmarks.[/QUOTE]

Actually, this is the news section of MYCE. The forums are around here somewhere, though. At any rate, I didn’t mean to offend you. Wait, that doesn’t sound like me. LOL. It’s a joke, man. Lighten up. I did say that I was just kidding.

When I get my SSD I will post my benchmarks. They will be phenomenal benchmarks. They will be the mother of all benchmarks. They will … ah, screw it.


#15

[QUOTE=alan1476;2644715]Very true, Intel has great SSDs, but I cant afford to spend over 1,000USD for 600gb SSD, when I can buy a 512gb from Crucial for 399.99. Intel has to come to terms with the fact that although their SSDs may be very good, they are not worth the premium placed on them. This is just my personal opinion though, others may very likely spend double for the Intel name brand, not me.:D[/QUOTE]

Intel was not the pioneer as some mistaken reviewers say on some less fortunate websites. It was Samsung, Indilinx, Mtron, and a few others. The flash technology was first developed by Toshiba and Intel.

Since Intel likes to sell their high-end desktop CPU products at over US$1,000 and low-end (budget or value or whatever you like to call) processors at under US$50, they have tried to do the same thing regarding SSD’s.

I bought some 32GB Mtron SSL NAND-based SSD’s at a liltte over US$100 per unit a few years ago. Some months, or one or two years later, Intel introduced SLC SSD lines along with MLC SSD lines. Unlike Mtron and Samsung, Intel was selling SLC drives at like five times the prices of MLC drives. Samsung Electronics also had both SLC drives and MLC drives, but Samsung’s price differences were not over 100%, and closer to 50%. OCZ followed Intel’s pattern. That’s why almost every SSD review in the West seemed to make readers believe there are only MLC-based SSD’s and SLC’s too expensive to use in consumer drives. Lots of people I have known since the late 1990s have used SLC drives since around 2005~2007 when a typical SSD capacity was between 16GB and 128GB, and it was only SLC for many of them.

Unlike the CPU business, Intel cannot lead the other manufacturers to follow their pricing strategies. Intel’s NAND marketshare has rapidly fallen, to a point so low that it had to create a venture with Micron: the IMFT. Samsung sold their HDD business to Seagate. Seagate bought OCZ who bought Indilinx who either bought or stole technologies from Samsung. Since Seagate now wants to market SSD drives to compete more directly against Samsung, those former Samsung HDD engineers and Indilinx engineers at Seagate are going to worry more about their identities and loyalty. Some of the former Samsung HDD business unit remained at Samsung. Those moving to Seagate were offered much higher salaries, but they are now saying average Samsung employees receive more than average Apple employees. Here’s another article.


Micron and a few other companies were also in talks with OCZ about a potential acquisition. The financial aspects of the deal could also prove quite interesting. Our sources believe that Seagate plans to offer much more than $308.5 million that Nasdaq values OCZ (OCZ). Just to put things in perspective Nasdaq values Seagate (STX) at $11.71 billion.

Just to put the larger picture in perspective, Indilinx was almost for free and Samsung Electronics is expected to have US$30 billion annual profits. Its largest customer Apple has more than US$100 billion in cash.

SSD Shipment Forecast - iSuppli

http://www.isuppli.com/Abstract/P23627_20120612121921.pdf

The three largest SSD makers are Intel (1), Samsung (2), and Toshiba (3), but it is possible Samsung actually ships more units as some of the OEM shipments may not be correctly reflected in statistics of iSuppli.

The four largest NAND flash makers are Samsung (1), Toshiba (2), Micron (3), and Hynix (4) - now of SK that also has SK Telecom.

The four largest mobile DRAM makers are Samsung (71%), Hynix (15%), Elpida (9%), and Micron (4%).


#16

Excellent stuff Kenny, I wish that post would have been longer. I am serious and I thank you for all that information, I knew that Micron made an offer of offset the offer that Seagate made for OCZ but it was not in the ball park and Seagate won out. Indilinx was the key, OCZ was smart. It knew that with Sandforce (LSI) it would never reach its goals. Now it has become the bleeding edge innovator in SSD Consumer drives, I would have never believed that I could could buy a 256gb Vertex 4 for 199.99USD like I can today.


#17

OCZ also own PLX Technologies.
That’s right, the company that makes those very expensive PCIe lane switches on high end motherboards.


#18

[QUOTE=Bunny;2644775]OCZ also own PLX Technologies.
That’s right, the company that makes those very expensive PCIe lane switches on high end motherboards.[/QUOTE]
Hi Bunny, they make alot of things that most are not aware of. But you are correct, they do make or design the PCI lane switches.


#19

I don’t think we should be jumping the gun just yet. As it stands at the moment, Seagate has not actually acquired OCZ, and OCZ are still an independent company, and neither Seagate or OCZ has confirmed.
Until they do, this is still speculation.
That’s why I put the “question mark” in the article title. :slight_smile:

Personally. I would like to know what you all think will be the effect of Seagate taking over OCZ, should this acquisition go ahead.

What will it bring to the SSD industry?
Will it be good for OCZ?
Will it be good for Seagate?
The most important question. Will it be good for consumers?


#20

[QUOTE=Dee;2644781][B]I don’t think we should be jumping the gun just yet. As it stands at the moment, Seagate has not actually acquired OCZ, and OCZ are still an independent company, and neither Seagate or OCZ has confirmed. [/B]
Until they do, this is still speculation.
That’s why I put the “question mark” in the article title. :slight_smile:

Personally. I would like to know what you all think will be the effect of Seagate taking over OCZ, should this acquisition go ahead.

What will it bring to the SSD industry?
Will it be good for OCZ?
Will it be good for Seagate?
The most important question. Will it be good for consumers?[/QUOTE]
You are very right, things like this happen all the time in big business, words turn into rumors and rumors turn into whatever the reader interputs the information to be. Until a deal is done its just speculation. Sometimes these deals take months or even years to complete but others get done in a day. Somewhat like a " Take it or leave it approach".
Personally I would [B]not[/B] like to see Seagate complete this deal, they are an 11 Billion dollar company and will continue to gobble up the smaller and more innovative brand names. Competition is a good thing for the consumer. I want it to stay that way.