Seagate FreeAgent 1.5TB 3.5" External Hard Drive

[B]Just bought a refurb one of these drives even after reading a handful of reviews discussing ‘clicking’ and possible failures…

anyone else have or heard good or bad about this drive?

would hate to end up putting stuff on there and losing it.

I’ve had two 400GB EX’s by Seagate and they’re flawless, so crossing fingers that my new 1.5 TB will be okay when it arrives.

any thoughts appreciated

peace,
The Buk[/B]

I wouldn’t put anything that is un-replaceable on that drive :disagree: those 1.5TB Seagate drives
are very un-reliable from what I’ve read and heard from other people that have used both
the FreeAgent 1.5TB and regular 3.5" 1.5TB drives. I just had a 1TB Seagate up and die on
me a few weeks ago no clicking noise, no noise of any kind turned the system on and bingo
a dead drive. To top it all off my 250GB Seagate is dying on me now and both drives are
only something like 6-7 months old so all I can say is I’m done with ever using Seagate drives
again only WD or Samsung drives for me from now on. :iagree:

The Seagate Barracuda 11 family had a known firmware issue that caused some drives to “lose” data. While Seagate said data was never lost, it was merely not accessible and that once the firmware’s were upgraded the data was intact. It’s worth noting that Seagate also worked with customers to allow for data recovery in the event that data was lost.

I think it was all overblown, personally. I don’t have any Seagate drives, but it has nothing to do with reliability. I think my WD drives perform better.

Generally speaking all drives, regardless of the manufacturer, are reliable. Sure, there are occasional bad batches or design flaws, but those get weeded out quickly, especially in this day with competition being as fierce as it is. Any one person’s experience is statistically irrelevant, mine included.

Handled properly, your Seagate drive isn’t any more likely to fail then my WD drive. I still have a 6 year old 250GB Maxtor drive in service and they had a reputation for being the most unreliable manufacturer when they were acquired by Seagate.

Whenever I acquire a new drive, I always run Smart diagnostic tests using the utility provided by the manufacturer. If it passes those tests, I then zero fill the drive. At that point, I’m comfortable with writing data to the drive.

I would say if it passes that above test, the drive should be fine. Handled properly, there isn’t any reason it shouldn’t be.

You said:
“Whenever I acquire a new drive, I always run Smart diagnostic tests using the utility provided by the manufacturer. If it passes those tests, I then zero fill the drive.”

Ok,… I am a plug and play kinda guy 9 times outta ten… I figure some things out, but not sure what you mean by the above statement.

If I remember correctly, the 2 stackable 400Gig drives by Seagate I have had for a LONG time now are perfectly fine, and I didn’t do anything to them that I can remember. One of the forums re:IMGBurn said something about how I should reformat them from Fat32 or something… anyways…

I just need more than my current 800 Gig external storage space, and yes, I would like for the drive to keep my items safe… please explain those “tests” for me as I think I am going to give this drive a shot. There were at least as many positive reviews on this one as bad, it was cheap (refurb), and my past experience with Seagate has been positive, so…

(crossing fingers)
-The Buk

Seagate Disk Utility

Download the software for your drive and run the diagnostic test.

When the drive passes that test and shows no errors, I then zero fill the dive. The purpose of this test is to verify the entire disk is good, as a regular format does not. It’s better to find out a drive is faulty when it is new, rather then after it is in service and has data you don’t wish to lose.

If the drive fails the SMART test or if a zero fill shows bad sectors, I return the disk and get a new one. Drives don’t improve with age and my data is more valuable to me then the extra hour or two it takes me to prep a disk.

Good advice… I’ll try to figure that out once I get it. lol like I said, the last two Seagate drives I never did anything but plug the USB’s into my computer and pop, there they were and have been ever since with ZERO data loss. Only thing I have heard is that I should reformat possibly from FAT32??? no clue how or why… I just want more storage space :slight_smile:
… and speaking of, is there a way to squeeze more space from this? I read that instead of 1.5 TB, you actually get aroun 1.1 or 2 after all the built in software spreads it’s elbows out… ???

The drive I ordered was from eCost.com (whom I’ve never used before),…
but $130 for a "Seagate 1.5TB FreeAgent Desktop Hard Drive - Silver - ST315005FDA2E1-RK 1.5TB Capacity, 480 Mbps Interface Transfer Rate, Hi-Speed USB Interface Type, 7200 rpm Spindle Speed (Manufacturer Recertified)"
it sounded pretty good to me… worth a shot at least since I’ve never had anything wrong with my past Seagate purchases. we’ll see if there’s anything wrong with it or not.

I just know my (2) 400 Gigs aren’t cutting it anymore

Thanks for the responses and help… hopefully I’ll figure it out when it gets here in a couple days

peace,
the Buk

[QUOTE=BukowskiSoul;2289128]Only thing I have heard is that I should reformat possibly from FAT32??? no clue how or why… I just want more storage space :slight_smile:
… and speaking of, is there a way to squeeze more space from this? I read that instead of 1.5 TB, you actually get aroun 1.1 or 2 after all the built in software spreads it’s elbows out… ???

[/QUOTE]

The NTFS file system is a more efficient file system for larger drives, would advise using it instead of FAT32. Use FAT32 if you need to connect the drive to an old Windows 98 machine, a Mac or if you have some other compatibility concern. NTFS is by far the better choice.

As far as space, you “lose” space not because of the software or because of formatting. In fact, you really don’t lose anything. There are two different methods to measure capacity in computer terms, binary and decimal. We think in decimal terms, disk makers use binary.

See this more a more technical explanation