Seagate built a whopping 60TB SSD that it aims ship next year

vbimport

#1

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Seagate says it can crank up storage capacity to 100TB or more on a new SSD design.

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There aren’t many shockers when it comes to storage capacity, but try this one on for size: Seagate has announced a 60TB SSD that may ship as early as next year.
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#2

LOL, with a SAS interface and thereby aimed at the Enterprise… Think about that as a possible single point of failure :bigsmile:

Storage capacity sure is running wild these days, but I like it - Where’s that PB capacity drive when you need it :slight_smile:


#3

[QUOTE=Xercus;2779219]Think about that as a possible single point of failure :bigsmile:[/QUOTE] Everything that only uses a single device is a single point of failure ranging from connectors to chips.

In this case it’s a 60TB single point of failure and that’s a big loss.


#4

Just slap a dozen of these together and run RAID 6 on them for protection. :smiley:


#5

I’m thinking the interface bottleneck is going to be an issue soon… sata 3 has not really had an update and this goes back to the (old?) scsi interface…
On the new ssd density side, this WOULD be a great innovation IF it were to drastically bring down entry level drives and make 1tb the starting point for say $50 (making that 60tb drive $3,000), but that’s not going to happen quick enough. SSD makers are NOTORIOUS for milking their innovative wares for all they can get and THEN SOME! This is what keep me delaying the upgrade of my pc and new laptop to SSD drives as the main OS drive.


#6

[QUOTE=DrageMester;2779232]Just slap a dozen of these together and run RAID 6 on them for protection. :D[/QUOTE]

Sure, and while we’re at it, we should take Mr. Belvedere’s concern as well and mirror the array in another box to avoid any single point of failure - would probably mean selling your home in the process, but that is of minor concern


#7

A few years ago we lost a TB drive along with a motherboard and to this day we are still finding things that we lost on it, because we did not have it backed up in time. 60TB, people will be jumping off of tall buildings and bridges.


#8

[QUOTE=beef barley;2779389]A few years ago we lost a TB drive along with a motherboard and to this day we are still finding things that we lost on it, because we did not have it backed up in time. 60TB, people will be jumping off of tall buildings and bridges.[/QUOTE]
That’s the risk all computing user take when using large capacity drive but also how you maintain and maintenance the drive contributes to it’s lifespan. Hardware failure will always happen HDD or SSD that is the nature of anything electrical. But using the drive as data/file storage only means it’s not running constantly will give it a longer lifespan.


#9

I don’t think I have generated 60TB worth of data in my entire life.


#10

[QUOTE=UTR;2779454]I don’t think I have generated 60TB worth of data in my entire life.[/QUOTE]

I think I would come pretty close if I collect all.

28TB RAID 6 - 98% Full (currently shut down mostly)
2x8TB Data Drives - 85% Full
4x4TB Backup drives - 95%+Full
400+ Data DVDs
1200+ Data CDs

Two of these would save space and then some :bigsmile:

There are too much happening at the moment and so I will have to wait and see what pops up around the bend before going further with my new RAID. RAID 6 really gives too little redundancy if we speak of several hundred TB storage.


#11

[QUOTE=UTR;2779454]I don’t think I have generated 60TB worth of data in my entire life.[/QUOTE]
If you got FB or Smartphone you already given 60tb of your life. Users vastly under estimate how much data they generate.


#12

[QUOTE=coolcolors;2779467]If you got FB or Smartphone you already given 60tb of your life. Users vastly under estimate how much data they generate.[/QUOTE]

I was referring to data I generate that would be on a local hard drive and things I would want to backup. Heck, I wouldn’t be surprised if even including the data I have generated online would exceed 60TB or even come close.


#13

I have over 100 TB of movies on HDD.
These are full disc backups that I watch ( when I have Time ) so I don’t have to dig out disc.


#14

[QUOTE=bean55;2779480]I have over 100 TB of movies on HDD.
These are full disc backups that I watch ( when I have Time ) so I don’t have to dig out disc.[/QUOTE]

How many days would it take to watch all those movies? Just curious. :eek:


#15

Just waiting for retirement, maybe I can finish watching them before I go :slight_smile:


#16

[QUOTE=bean55;2779487]Just waiting for retirement, maybe I can finish watching them before I go :)[/QUOTE]I think it be sooner then later with that much… lol :stuck_out_tongue:


#17

[QUOTE=bean55;2779487]Just waiting for retirement, maybe I can finish watching them before I go :)[/QUOTE]

I just did some rough math. Assuming a DL DVD worth of data per movie and 1-3/4 hours per movie average, 100TB would contain 12,500 movies. Then assuming 1.75 hours per movie it would take 911 days (2.5 years), watching 24 hours per day. If you watched for 8 hours per day then it would take 7.5 years. :eek:


#18

Double post.


#19

According to my spreadsheet I have 5,078 movies listed.
I still have about 200 vhs to move to DVD and HDD, and I have not even listed the last year of movies on it.
And I still get 2 or 3 movies a week.
Most of these I will probably never watch again, but I have them if I want to watch them.

A couple of 60TB drives would do me good :bigsmile:


#20

[QUOTE=bean55;2779480]I have over 100 TB of movies on HDD.
These are full disc backups that I watch ( when I have Time ) so I don’t have to dig out disc.[/QUOTE]

Full disc, very cool.

I still have about 200 vhs to move to DVD and HDD

I’m very interested. Can I ask how you do this and with what?