Sandy Bridge E and the X79 chipset

vbimport

#1

SB-E and the X79 chipset will be out soon.
There is already a few previews around the Internet already.

SB-E will use the LGA 2011 socket and is a replacement for the aging original i7 LGA 1366 CPUs and the X58 chipset.

The SB-E CPUs look awesome, with 4 core and 6 core variants, they can access quad channel memory, and support PCIe 3. It doesn’t have the onboard graphics of the LGA 1155 Sandy Bridge CPUs, so no Intel Quick Sync video encoding and decoding. The 6 core versions are expected to retail at around £700, so this is not a cheap CPU.

The original spec of the X79 chipset also looked awesome. There was to be PCIe3 support, a dedicated x4 PCIe3 pathway for SATA3, with support for 10 SATA3 ports.

That was the original spec, the finished product appears to fall far short of that original spec.
Intel don’t appear to be able to get PCIe3 working properly, so the first revisions of this these boards may not have PCIe3 support. A new chipset stepping revision may fix this.

The 10 SATA 3 ports have been cut to two, and the dedicated x4 PCIe3 SATA 3 pathway has been disabled.

So what does that leave?
Well support for the new SB-E CPUs and quad channel memory support.

For gamers and number crunchers, the lack of 10 SATA3 ports probably won’t be a problem, neither will be the loss of the onboard graphics. PCIe3 support at the moment won’t be a problem, but it could be in the future.

For the rest of us, the mainstream folks, who perhaps do some picture, video, and audio editing. X79 and SB-E doesn’t look that attractive, In fact 2600K and the new Ivy Bridge (22nm) CPUs due in 2012 is probably much more attractive.

Ivy Bridge should work fine on P67/Z68 boards, but at Ivy Bridge launch there will be the new Z77 chipset boards. They will offer native PCIe3 support (providing Intel can get it working) and native USB3 support from within the Z77 chipset.

Are any of you planing on buying SB-E and X79?


#2

I am waiting patiently for the LGA2011 and the X79. I already have the case in my garage, brand new Silverstone Raven RV02, and PSU 850W fully modular. All I need is the RAM and the board and the CPU.:bigsmile::bigsmile: I am goiing to go with the Corsair H-100 enclosed cooling on this build. I already have a buyer for my Asus Rampage Extreme 111 X58 board and 980X processor in the Corsair Obsidian 800D Case.


#3

[QUOTE=Dee;2606073]
Are any of you planing on buying SB-E and X79?[/QUOTE]

No thanks.


#4

Hmmm, quad channel memory, but is it still DDR3?

Triple channel on x58 didn’t have a performance boost, I wonder if quad channel can get some real results this time around (assuming its still DDR3).


#5

[QUOTE=Dee;2606073]
Are any of you planing on buying SB-E and X79?[/QUOTE]

Yes I want it :iagree:
SB E 6 core ( 3960 or 3980 ) and 2700K ( LGA 1155 )

ASRock X79 Extreme7


#6

[QUOTE=Dee;2606073]Are any of you planing on buying SB-E and X79?[/QUOTE]

Wrong period in my upgrade cycle I’m afraid so that’s another no here.

It’s not that I perceive there’s anything wrong with the technology, it’s just that I have a limited budget and I bought a new machine not all that long ago.

[B]Wombler[/B]


#7

It doesn’t have the onboard graphics of the LGA 1155 Sandy Bridge CPUs, so no Intel Quick Sync video encoding and decoding.

No problem with this, it’s known that the platform is for enthusiasts, the rest of the users can be very happy with a Z68 board.

  1. Intel don’t appear to be able to get PCIe3 working properly, so the first revisions of this these boards may not have PCIe3 support.
  1. The 10 SATA 3 ports have been cut to two

I would like to have some more info about this parts Dee. To me it looks like intel simply want to put some new products. Honestly you can get two SATA3 ports with most of the P67/Z68 boards, also the PCIe3 is a hardware or a software problems?
If it’s a hardware then we are probably looking for some new boards, if it’s software it should be fixed sooner or later (maybe much later, or maybe the same time that intel will fix the p67z68 issues with SATA3)


#8

I will be replacing my 980X with the 3960X. But I do not think this will happen until next year at the earliest.:wink:


#9

I’ll probably go Sandy Bridge-E eventually, definitely not the first year though. My X58 setups are doing all I need currently, especially my main PC with a 980x and 12GB of DDR3 2000.


#10

[QUOTE=Two Degrees;2606183]I’ll probably go Sandy Bridge-E eventually, definitely not the first year though. My X58 setups are doing all I need currently, especially my main PC with a 980x and 12GB of DDR3 2000.[/QUOTE]
Hi TD, what X58 mobo do you have your 980X in?


#11

[QUOTE=alan1476;2606189]Hi TD, what X58 mobo do you have your 980X in?[/QUOTE]

Gigabyte GA-X58A-UD9.


#12

[QUOTE=vroom;2606105]I would like to have some more info about this parts Dee. To me it looks like intel simply want to put some new products. Honestly you can get two SATA3 ports with most of the P67/Z68 boards, also the PCIe3 is a hardware or a software problems?
If it’s a hardware then we are probably looking for some new boards, if it’s software it should be fixed sooner or later (maybe much later, or maybe the same time that intel will fix the p67z68 issues with SATA3)[/QUOTE]No idea if it’s a hardware problem or not. The X79 chipset was relying on PCIe3. If that doesn’t work then there simply isn’t the bandwidth available to make the other things work regarding the original X79 spec.

X79 has 40 +4 PCIe lanes, compared to P67/Z68 24 lanes.
LGA 2011 and SB-E is a also a two chip solution, just like Sandy Bridge and P67/Z68. All the northbridge functions are now housed on the CPU package itself.

On X79, that was to be a quad channel memory controller.
32 PCIe lanes for graphics
8 PCIe lanes for the southbridge (PCH)
Plus - 4 PCIe lanes for dedicated storage.

Each PCIe3 lane has 1GB/s of synchronous bandwidth (full duplex).
In the original spec that was to cover things like LAN, sound, SATA3, USB3, and PCIe x1 slots.

That would have given 4 SATA3 ports, and four USB3 slots direct from the PCH.
The x4 PCIe uplink to the CPU was to accommodate SAS and upto 6 further SATA3 ports.

SAS hasn’t made it, and neither has USB3

If you lose PCIe3, then you half the bandwidth, with half the bandwidth you no longer have enough bandwidth to do what you wanted to do in the first place.

Its still not clear if the x4 dedicated storage uplink to the CPU can be used or not, and how much bandwidth it will have.

Note. If you had 10 SATA3 ports, there was no need for SATA2 ports since SATA3 ports will quite happily run SATA2 devices.
It’s a mess for sure, and I personally wouldn’t touch X79 with a barge pole until PCIe3 can be made to work, and even then, Z68 with 2600K will most likely still outperform an SB-E 6 core at encoding HD video, because the 2600K and Z68 can still use quick sync.

Ivy Bridge with its HD4000 graphics promise 2x the quick sync performance of Sandy Bridge (HD3000).
To me, SB to Ivy Bridge is more of an update than SB to SB-E and socket 2011.


#13

Overclockers and benchers will eat up X79 since it will allow adjusting the baseclock.


#14

[QUOTE=Two Degrees;2606210]Overclockers and benchers will eat up X79 since it will allow adjusting the baseclock.[/QUOTE]

Good point, but the sales wont come from the over-clocking community. But over-clocking is fun :bigsmile:


#15

Intel’s top line chipsets are pretty much targeted at gamers and enthusiasts, who else is going to pay $1K for a CPU and $300+ for a motherboard?


#16

[QUOTE=Two Degrees;2606204]Gigabyte GA-X58A-UD9.[/QUOTE]

I am using the Asus Rampage 111 Extreme X-58 with my 980X, how do you like the Gigabyte?

Two Degrees;2606220]Intel’s top line chipsets are pretty much targeted at gamers and enthusiasts, who else is going to pay $1K for a CPU and $300+ for a motherboard?
Me, this is my only hobby and I get most of my knowledge from Wendy, and the info she provides me has been right on.:wink:


#17

[QUOTE=Dee;2606208]No idea if it’s a hardware problem or not. The X79 chipset was relying on PCIe3. If that doesn’t work then there simply isn’t the bandwidth available to make the other things work regarding the original X79 spec.

X79 has 40 +4 PCIe lanes, compared to P67/Z68 24 lanes.
LGA 2011 and SB-E is a also a two chip solution, just like Sandy Bridge and P67/Z68. All the northbridge functions are now housed on the CPU package itself.

On X79, that was to be a quad channel memory controller.
32 PCIe lanes for graphics
8 PCIe lanes for the southbridge (PCH)
Plus - 4 PCIe lanes for dedicated storage.

Each PCIe3 lane has 1GB/s of synchronous bandwidth (full duplex).
In the original spec that was to cover things like LAN, sound, SATA3, USB3, and PCIe x1 slots.

That would have given 4 SATA3 ports, and four USB3 slots direct from the PCH.
The x4 PCIe uplink to the CPU was to accommodate SAS and upto 6 further SATA3 ports.

SAS hasn’t made it, and neither has USB3

If you lose PCIe3, then you half the bandwidth, with half the bandwidth you no longer have enough bandwidth to do what you wanted to do in the first place.

Its still not clear if the x4 dedicated storage uplink to the CPU can be used or not, and how much bandwidth it will have.

Note. If you had 10 SATA3 ports, there was no need for SATA2 ports since SATA3 ports will quite happily run SATA2 devices.
It’s a mess for sure, and I personally wouldn’t touch X79 with a barge pole until PCIe3 can be made to work, and even then, Z68 with 2600K will most likely still outperform an SB-E 6 core at encoding HD video, because the 2600K and Z68 can still use quick sync.

Ivy Bridge with its HD4000 graphics promise 2x the quick sync performance of Sandy Bridge (HD3000).
To me, SB to Ivy Bridge is more of an update than SB to SB-E and socket 2011.[/QUOTE]
Well now you have me thinking again, ( very dangerous) Maybe I should update my socket 1155 2600K, since I have the mainboard already.


#18

[QUOTE=alan1476;2606221]I am using the Asus Rampage 111 Extreme X-58 with my 980X, how do you like the Gigabyte?
[/QUOTE]

I have a R3E in my other machine, honestly at the end of the day it boils down to onboard features because they have about the same overclocking power. I like all of the SATA ports the UD9 and its smaller brothers have which make it easy to hook up all the SATA devices I have without needing any add-in cards, and the fact that they have one IDE channel for older burners.


#19

[QUOTE=Two Degrees;2606246]I have a R3E in my other machine, honestly at the end of the day it boils down to onboard features because they have about the same overclocking power. I like all of the SATA ports the UD9 and its smaller brothers have which make it easy to hook up all the SATA devices I have without needing any add-in cards, and the fact that they have one IDE channel for older burners.[/QUOTE]
I like the IDE channell also, but I used an SIIG IDE controller Card.:slight_smile:


#20

[QUOTE=Dee;2606208]
To me, SB to Ivy Bridge is more of an update than SB to SB-E and socket 2011.[/QUOTE]

I agree :iagree:
it is really bad timing to upgrade PC
SB E Core i7 3960X NOV / 15 / 2011
SB E Core i7 3980X Q1 - Q2 - 2012
Ivy Brige Core I7 Q1 - Q2 - 2012
Ivy Bridge [B]E[/B] series Core ??? think I Q4 2012