Samsung T3 2TB External USB3 SSD Review

vbimport

#1

We’ve just posted the following review: Samsung T3 2TB External USB3 SSD Review[newsimage]http://www.myce.com/wp-content/images_posts/2016/03/image001-1-95x75.jpg[/newsimage]

The Samsung T3 is a tiny external USB3 SSD, packing an impressive 2TB of storage.
Let’s find out how this SSD performs in this article.

            Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/review/samsung-t3-2tb-external-usb3-ssd-review-78836/](http://www.myce.com/review/samsung-t3-2tb-external-usb3-ssd-review-78836/)

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#2

Thanks for the review. It must have been difficult handing this little beauty back to Samsung. :flower:

Looks like a great drive - very fast, highly portable and with an amazing capacity. Something like this combined with Windows to Go is a potential game changer. :iagree:

But Samsung need to make one small improvement…

…move the decimal point one place to the left on the price. :sad:

As it stands the price per GB is reasonably competitive with smaller internal SSDs, but almost £600 is prohibitively expensive. Still it shows just what is possible with current technologies & standards.

Already eagerly anticipating the arrival of its successor. It could be argued that Samsung missed a trick by not making this a combined USB 3.1 & Thunderbolt 3 drive - both using the same USB type-C connection. But that probably would have been a bit too far ahead of the time.

Although the standards have been ratified, being so far ahead of the computing market has historically been rather risky. In the past many such devices have been affected by unforeseen compatibility issues once the rest of the market catches up and establishes what the de facto real world standard will be.

Thunderbolt has had a pretty easy ride so far, being almost entirely confined to the closed world of Apple. But when it eventually gains traction in the open market of PCs there are inevitably going to be teething troubles - the people who draw-up & ratify the standards are often very different to those who have to engineer & implement them in the real world.