Samsung starts mass production of Ultrabook PCIe SSDs - 1400 MB/s reads

vbimport

#1

I just posted the article Samsung starts mass production of Ultrabook PCIe SSDs - 1400 MB/s reads.

Samsung today announced that it will start mass producing PCI Express SSDs targeted for Ultrabooks

Click to read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/samsung-starts-mass-production-of-ultrabook-pcie-ssds-1400-mbs-reads-67535/](http://www.myce.com/news/samsung-starts-mass-production-of-ultrabook-pcie-ssds-1400-mbs-reads-67535/)

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#2

Now THIS is getting to be interesting. DigiTimes had an article about OEM motherboard makers engineering slots for these a few months ago, but I wasn’t thinking “ultrabooks” at the time. I wonder if there are any heating concerns, which might limit the number of sticks per machine?


#3

Ultrabooks are constrained by space.
It’s likely that only one of these drives per ultrabook is possible.


#4

PCIe SSD’s? not mSATA drives that are physically identical, but electrically incompatible?


#5

If they’re promising read speeds of up to 1.4k MB/s, I don’t think that’s happening over mSATA.

Of course, I have to wonder why this great technology is now happening for these delightful little ultrabooks, but many desktop users are left to be content with a slightly slower SSD hanging off an SATA controller. (Otherwise, they pay exorbitant amounts of money for an SSD sitting on the PCIe bus, or are stuck defaulting to a RAID setup of either flash or magnetic storage).

I know, physical size, use cases, consumer demand, keeping a weak market thriving, and all that jazz…but then it still feels like the storage industry held back on developing flash storage for the masses, letting us be content with only the spinning platters (that admittedly hold quite a bit of information, at decent speeds) for longer than necessary.

It just would have been nice to see this innovation happen a lot sooner, and I hope it propagates to many more market segments so we can raise the baseline capabilities and quality metrics of even the low-end machines.


#6

Making things small & energy efficient & low power = expensive.
Ultrabooks = expensive.
Perfect niche for this product.

Then they’ll make it cheaper, and bring it to the larger/cheaper market.

Msata was a bridge for older pcs and older os’s.
It’s no longer required to imitate a sata controller.


#7

When I saw these first waves of Intel 87 boards arrive with no mSATAs, that confirmed my notion that mSATAs were the JAZ Drive of the SSD world - good for a generation or two, that’s about it.

The use in Ultrabooks makes perfect sense, although so does filling an existing design’s drive-bays with multiple sticks, too. That was the reason for my Heat Question because, if one produces very little, then 6 produces that much more. RAM is a low-heat producer in notebooks, compared to HDDs and CPUs. But I’m uncertain if a PCIe mem stick would produce more than RAM, or merely a corresponding amount.


#8

[QUOTE=AllanDeGroot;2690511]PCIe SSD’s? not mSATA drives that are physically identical, but electrically incompatible?[/QUOTE]
Not physically identical, only similar. Not Electrically Compatible.
Physically similar, and if you don’t have the two in front of you, or a manual for the Motherboard, you’d have to google what it is.

Basically, msata looks like a mini-pcie upside down.

Images gratuitously stolen from wikipedia (Hey, I donated).


#9

[QUOTE=debro;2690525]Making things small & energy efficient & low power = expensive.
Ultrabooks = expensive.
Perfect niche for this product.

Then they’ll make it cheaper, and bring it to the larger/cheaper market.

Msata was a bridge for older pcs and older os’s.
It’s no longer required to imitate a sata controller.[/QUOTE]

The official Samsung answer to that is that smaller SSD drive can help ultrabook manufacturers to provide longer lasting batteries.

1,400MB/s SSD speed and longer battery time sound good in advertising, but such words sound much better in ultrabook ads than in desktop ads.

Samsung seems little interested in making extremely fast desktop SSD products, not for the mass, not within the foreseeable future, not Samsung style, but the only good thing I like about Samsung’s Galaxy S 4 is its 802.11ac component, which should be really fast in sending and receiving 1920 x 1080 video files.


#10

[QUOTE=Kenshin;2690588]The official Samsung answer to that is that smaller SSD drive can help ultrabook manufacturers to provide longer lasting batteries.

1,400MB/s SSD speed and longer battery time sound good in advertising, but such words sound much better in ultrabook ads than in desktop ads.

Samsung seems little interested in making extremely fast desktop SSD products, not for the mass, not within the foreseeable future, not Samsung style, but the only good thing I like about Samsung’s Galaxy S 4 is its 802.11ac component, which should be really fast in sending and receiving 1920 x 1080 video files.[/QUOTE]

You don’t care much for the Galaxy S4? Does this mean you prefer the iPhone 5? In Korea, do people tend to support the local brand over the foreign brand?


#11

The PC industry’s LONG overdue for a bump on the sata interface… at least 1200MB/sec is warranted here for throughput. Wouldn’t these chips heat-up if utilized in a high capacity for a long time? No doubt the have DDR-style heat spreaders connected to heat pipes.


#12

[QUOTE=tmc8080;2691492]The PC industry’s LONG overdue for a bump on the sata interface… at least 1200MB/sec is warranted here for throughput. Wouldn’t these chips heat-up if utilized in a high capacity for a long time? No doubt the have DDR-style heat spreaders connected to heat pipes.[/QUOTE]

It’s probable that they have thermal protection to throttle performance for the sake of longevity, like some SATA SSDs these days do. But even RAM can get on without active cooling in most applications, as long as the chips get some sort of airflow.

However, I’m sure some applications of this style of drive would require a bit more active cooling, for sure. The storage controller itself would be the main concern, since a sort of load balancing could avoid heating the NAND packages.


#13

The whole idea is they would be in “ULTRA BOOKS” which are supposed to be ALMOST tablet thin these days. Not much airflow… Just enough for active cooling of the cpu & graphics chipsets… this board would have to be strategically placed away from the charging section where thermal heat will generate charging the battery and that doesn’t leave lots of room for active cooling…

Typically m/b’s of less than 8 layers don’t hold up over time… these are the flimsy sports cars of the laptop world.


#14

[QUOTE=tmc8080;2691502]
Typically m/b’s of less than 8 layers don’t hold up over time… these are the flimsy sports cars of the laptop world.[/QUOTE]
I have to wonder if this is to an advantage or disadvantage in terms of reducing environmental impact. On one hand, the devices could last long, but people will still trade up, so the less material used, the better.

On the other hand, these things could die prematurely left and right (relative to traditional hard drives & more robust 2.5"/3.5" SSDs), so people will have to replace them more frequently.

We can’t forget a point that everyone mentions: the potential for data loss if people don’t back up (which, even in a world of cloud backup, 4 TB external hard drives, and 1-click automated backup, is still a problem). Enough exaggerated thermal cycles, and we have chips failing like they did when manufacturers had to switch solder types.

I doubt that even the use of metal in ultrabooks can stave off heating issues, unless ultrabook manufacturers do as ODD manufacturers do. If that happens, then we’ll be seeing little divots and notches in the bottom of our laptops the size of the chips on the SSD.

I’d still feel a bit safer if they slapped a little heat exchanger on it and placed it close to the primary system fans. :confused:


#15

Umm… to hell with that… start putting this stuff in TABLETS… the SSD’s they make today barely handle 100MB/sec let alone a gigabyte per second… THIS is where the demand is… not laptops.