Samsung SN-506BB internal vs USB version

vbimport

#1

hi, i have a few questions about the Samsung SN-506BB BD burner in external (1) and internal version (2):

[ol]
[li]can i easily open the USB enclosure and connect the drive via a sata cable (+ slimline sata adapter)?[/li][li]does the internal version still support the AV mode when connected with an USB adapter like this?[/li][/ol]
Do you know other USB enclosure models featuring the AV/mass storage mode?


#2

side question: are these manually tray-loaded drives reliable as the desktop automatically-loaded models?
I think drives like these are more prone to burn errors due to the manual loading (more imprecise than automatic).


#3

Let us use specific model names:

SE-506BB: The external model, connected via USB, featuring “AV Mode”. (This is likely replaced by the SE-506CB, with newer - but not necessarily better - hardware).

SN-506BB: The internal model, connected natively via SATA. This model, due to it being designed for use in a computer, does not have AV mode to emulate a USB-attached HDD.

Now, let us tackle the two questions:
(1) I am unaware if you can extract the drive in the SE-506_B from the case. Recently, due to the desire to make drives smaller, the USB port has been put on the drive itself. I would expect the drive to not have an SATA port on it.

(2) As mentioned, the SN-506BB does not have the feature.

LG’s external drives also seem to have an AV mode. But I would bet that the slim drives also have the USB port on the drive itself due to the small dimensions.

Any reason you want to disassemble the SE-506, only to sometimes use it as an external drive?

Oh, and (3): slim drives have a reputation for shorter lives because they have smaller components that can take less wear & tear, and are in a smaller area that doesn’t allow the heat to escape quite as easily (less air circulation within the drive). Dirt & contamination directly on the tray (for tray loading types) doesn’t help. For slot-loading types, the loading mechanism is an additional component to wear out or jam up. … But slim drives don’t necessarily fail that much more often with moderate use.


#4

thank you for the tips, i think i’ll go with a full-sized internal unit because reliability is the most important factor for me (more important than portability).

In the past i had some bad experiences with those slim drives, and i’m not very prone to rely on them for important burns…


#5

[QUOTE=Albert;2770129]
(1) I am unaware if you can extract the drive in the SE-506_B from the case. Recently, due to the desire to make drives smaller, the USB port has been put on the drive itself. I would expect the drive to not have an SATA port on it.
[/QUOTE]

I can confirm that Albert’s is 100% correct.

I bought one of these drives (which are easier to find compared to the SN counterparts and can be found cheaper) from eBay a while ago intending to open the enclosure and use the internal drive in a laptop.

Opening the SE-506 enclosure (in a non destructive way) wasn’t that much of a problem, but unfortunately the drive inside the enclosure is not a standard SN-506 drive, but a drive which instead of the normal SATA connector has a built-in USB connector.

So, unlike older enclosures which used to use standard SATA drives and a separate USB bridge to connect to them, with these drives all the USB hardware is built-in inside the drive itself, with the drive’s normal SATA connector being basically replaced by a USB connector. All the electronics is inside of the drive itself. There is no other separate electronics in the enclosure itself. The enclosure itself is basically just a plastic box with some screws which encases the actual drive, and nothing more.


#6

I know that it’s long time since the question was up, but I took some pictures of a SE-506BB drive after dismantling the case. Anyone interested can see them HERE.


#7

Manually loading tray drives are meant to be slim and fit in a laptop. Occasionally, old desktop drives have trouble with getting their tray stuck.

Slim drives until today only achieve around half the speeds of desktop drives and support fewer burning speeds. Example: CDs are limited to ×24 (slim drives could reach ×32 if they wanted, with ease).

Desktop drives usually reach higher recording qualities at high recording speeds, while the reading error handling on slim drives reaches desktop levels.

Slim drives only have 60-70% power consumption at same rotation speed.