Safest way to store DVD/CDs for a long time

vbimport

#1

I’ve got hundreds of DVDs which holds photos I’ve taken from the past and music recordings I did at my very own place. The problem is unlike yester years price of Jewelery boxes has gone up like crazy in my area.

I’ve got a few CD stacking towers but I don’t feel comfortable seeing the DVD/s on the lower area baring the weight of the rest of the DVDs. It WILL make the disks get scratched and will damage the foil too.

Can someone please tell me what is the best way to store DVDs and CDs for a long period of time?

Upto now I have safely stored some of them by putting them into jewelry boxes and covering them all in one air tight box. But now space has become a big issue, plus the prices of CD cases has gone up significantly high and I’m thinking about alternatives.

Years back I can remember on metacafe some guy showing how to make a paper CD holder case which covers upthe whole CD neatly and is much slimmer than a slim CD case. I’m thinking of making plenty of 'em and storing them inside another identical air tight box with mothballs in it. Can someone please tell me is that a good idea?


#2

I use these cases from Linkyo. Have close to 1500 movie backups dating back to the days of DVDShrink and they all play just as nice today as when I first backed them up.


#3

Have you considered storing your photos and music on hard-drive(s) instead?

Your photos and music are not conveniently accessible when stored on hundreds of discs in a number of containers, and making backups/copies is a nightmare.

You should consider copying the content onto (external) hard-drive(s) and then having one or more additional copies on other hard-drives stored in safe locations.


#4

Who actually has more than 12-16gb of photos?

I just bought two 16gb Sandisk at Staples and got change from a $20bill
They were $7.99+tx each.

As for storing music? think real hard about whatever $120gb SSD you see on sale
and installing it in a rugged USB or eSATA external enclosure.

I expect to upgrade from my current 120gb SSD to a 256gb as soon as I can
and when that happens what do you think I will do with my six month old
120gb SSD?

I’ve personally had -R optical media go “off” in as little as 18months.
a HDD stored in a drawer is perfectly readable a decade later.

How long will an SSD stored in a drawer retain it’s data?

I fully intend to store one filled with mp3’s (with CRC data to detect errors)
for a decade to find out.

The part that bugs me most about the archaic idea of optical media backups is the horribly painful slowness of reading the data back and the even more painfully slow process of writing it to discs in the first place.

While I can write a full DVD+R in <5minutes I can write the same data to a spinning hard drive in about 40seconds.

I don’t want to think about writing 200gb of data to a stack of DVD+R discs.
ignoring the fact that it’ll take 40discs I can write the same data to a HDD in a bit over an hour.

Before I go back to using optical backups for large data sets I’ll take up “cutting” but unlike some neurotic wimply girl I’ll do it right, I’ll buy a shiny new 60cc chainsaw… and cut off a whole leg.


#5

Hey Kipper I’d go with a external hard drive,I just moved and first mistake was packing 500 cds in a box ,it must of weigh 2-3 hundred pounds.I’m a old man but even for a young man that’s a heavy load.why all the cds,I started years ago collecting cds and this was before mp3’s and wanting to have cds separate to identify the different artist.Well I have a NAS unit and still haven’t filled it up.I turn it on only when I need to copy and to down load into it.


#6

[QUOTE=AllanDeGroot;2670034]Who actually has more than 12-16gb of photos?
[/QUOTE]

People who care about RAW-data. One card of 16 GB is faster full than you think.

I just bought two 16gb Sandisk at Staples and got change from a $20bill
They were $7.99+tx each.

The worst idea to store data for a longer time. I saw more USB sticks die than DVDs.
What is the writing rate of these cheap sticks?

HDD = fast, easy accessible, possible to recover in most cases (can cost a fortune), but if one fails you have a loss of hundreds of GB - so you need to have a backup

optical media = good option for additional backup - if you want to be on the save side - burn the data twice (different brands of media & if you are paranoid with 2 different burner). I also never use the full capacity - for different reasons I try to keep 10-20% free. (I use only 4 GB on DVD and 20GB and BR-D - whenever possible)


#7

Black’s question about safest storage of optical disks is something we’ve pondered. I don’t know if “air tight” is so necessary. After all, the data-film sealed between the plastic and coating layers isn’t too prone to blue-northers or Santa Ana winds.

It’s their chemistry - the petro-chemical makeup - that creates varying ‘lifespans’ of that data. Those chemicals are not inert, nor is the plastic or glues that are the bonding agents. It’s probably an airtight seal - against outside air - but by its nature, gases may be released by all the other chemistries involved inside the disk.

There are certainly a number of great solutions to data storage but I think the great majority of “optical disk deaths” are due to their chemistry, not my ability to store them next to our napalm test-grounds. Or the sandblasters. Or running out of clean knives to spread that crunchy peanut butter with.

And while leaving the Disreali Gears album on the car’s back-window deck yielded a rather rollercoaster-ish LP, it was still playable, and Jack Bruce didn’t sound any worse for the wear. I’m not sure I’d do that with his CDs, though. “Maybe if I re-heat it, we can flatten it out enough to fit into the player’s slot, yes?”


#8

FWIW, there’s no such thing as “safe” digital storage of anything. This is why we have the term “back up”. If you’re not backed up you WILL lose your stuff.

Spindles are fine for storing discs because discs all have a “stacking ring” on the hub so there’s no contact between discs. You’ll certainly get more wear and damage from sliding a disc in and out of a paper sleeve than you ever will in a spindle.

There are inexpensive 4-disc jewel cases that are the same size as a standard jewel case. Also 4 and 6 disc DVD cases that are the same size as a regular case.


#9

You can find the slim CD/DVD cases on sale at Staples and other places on occasion. Unfortunately, you can’t read the spine of those very well. Keeping over 1500 of my music CD’s organized became impossible at one point after multiple moves. I tried the huge music binders with cloth backs and plastic sleeves but I scratched a number of CD’s trying to get them in and out. Not to mention they present convenient targets for thieves.

So I initiated a ripping project in order to copy everything on a HD. I have copies of the music CD’s on multiple HD’s. I have kept one HD copy at a relatives house in years past just in case of fire.


#10

Well the basic idea is guys when it comes to storing photos, videos and audio on DVDs is that it’s kinda more universal. For an example a basic DVD player is always capable of viewing photos and videos while other storage devices depend on a PC. I truly agree that storing on HDs is much faster and reliable. But HD enemy; Magnetism is a big threat plus they die in a most unexpected occasions. So as a habit I store em on both DVD and HDs. But I credit more on DVDs because they’re more reliable.

Back to the point; Is it a good idea to store DVDs inside paper DVD covers?

Thanks for the ideas you have me but I’m having difficulties on buying stuff from the internet so I can only go for whatever that is available on local stores.


#11

As long as the paper sleeves are clean, you’re not liable to scratch the polycarbonate, but there is always some friction pulling them in and out. And in my part of the country, dust is an ever present enemy for electronics and optical media.

I’ve often made emergency sleeves from standard 8 1/2" x 11" printer paper. Folding the paper once across its length gives you a 5 1/2" slot that the disc will fit in, then fold each side over until the disc is almost snug, then tape down the side folds.

Its not what I would use for long term storage however. Mine are in flexible plastic, half-sized cases, stored on edge in a specially made cabinet. Any extras go back into cakeboxes, though they are much harder to sort through and access.


#12

[QUOTE=marloyd;2670059]Hey Kipper I’d go with a external hard drive,I just moved and first mistake was packing 500 cds in a box ,it must of weigh 2-3 hundred pounds.I’m a old man but even for a young man that’s a heavy load.why all the cds,I started years ago collecting cds and this was before mp3’s and wanting to have cds separate to identify the different artist.Well I have a NAS unit and still haven’t filled it up.I turn it on only when I need to copy and to down load into it.[/QUOTE]

Yea, I hear ya regarding old age. LOL

The case I mention does get heavy with the 500 discs in it but nothing my wife cant handle when they need to be moved. LOL


#13

[QUOTE=~KIPPER~;2670241]Yea, I hear ya regarding old age. LOL

The case I mention does get heavy with the 500 discs in it but nothing my wife cant handle when they need to be moved. LOL[/QUOTE]

LOL, those DJ style storage cases you’ve recommended though are the best method for keeping large numbers of optical discs IMO as they hold them all vertically (helping to minimise warping), protect each disc individually, and keep large numbers in a very compact space. :iagree:

For the benefit of those that haven’t seen them before the plastic sleeves are usually lined with a protective material (Tyvek or similar) to prevent the data side of the discs getting scratched.

The ones I have are effectively double sided with a Tyvek dividing liner down the middle, which means you can safely store two discs in each pouch.

[B]Wombler[/B]


#14

I gave away most of my discs to various people and agencys, but I still burn a few once in awhile, most now are kept on large hdds.:slight_smile:


#15

[QUOTE=alan1476;2670289]I gave away most of my discs to various people and agencys, but I still burn a few once in awhile, most now are kept on large hdds.:)[/QUOTE]

A great plan Alan; at your age you probably wouldn’t even be able to drag one of these storage cases. LOL


#16

Paper sleeves are not good for long term storage unless you get the ones where they have the chemicals removed so as to be non-reactive with the disc.


#17

If you wanna use CD/s/DVDs instead of flash drives/etc, I’d recommend you to first organize your entire collection to your hard drive and then burn to brand new good quality DVDs (I recommend dual layer ones).

I’ve also stumbled upon a thing in Nero called SecurDisc, apparently it stores the same files several times in the disk so if part of it gets scratched or anything, they’re also in another.

To add more layers of protection, flash drives/external hard drives and online backup (Dropbox, Sugarsync, Crashplan) etc would be great too :slight_smile:


#18

[QUOTE=cheapdvds;2670486](I recommend dual layer ones).[/QUOTE]
Why DL?

I’ve also stumbled upon a thing in Nero called SecurDisc, apparently it stores the same files several times in the disk so if part of it gets scratched or anything, they’re also in another.

But this works only if the disc is still partially readable.
And another problem - afaik it is proprietary.
All non-standard backups are already a failure in design. I mean long time backups - not temporarily ones.


#19

IMO, you should be transitioning to higher capacity media and make more redundant backups… from cd-r to dvd-r to blu rays… then for safety you have other options for redundancy… more copies of optical media, hard drives, flash drives, ssd and “ONLINE” storage lockers where they allegedly keep your data safe (some for free, some for a FEE-- based on space/time) It all depends on your BUDGET and needs… probably some data is not as important as others…

** It’s at a time like after hurricane Sandy that people start to think about-- oh jeez what happens if I don’t prepare for a disaster like that… Online storage for redundancy might be a safer bet… as well as a hard drive stuffed into a bank vault (or some fire, flood/water proof box), which you keep checking on every 6 months off-site…


#20

Optical media can be a safe backup choice if you’re using the right media and M-Disc can be a viable solution providing you’ve copies held off-site.

[B]Wombler[/B]