Safe box storage SD or USB?

vbimport

#1

I have placed 2 USB drives in my banks safe deposit box thus far, but am thinking of using some old 1gb-4gb SD drives instead. The USBs are 8gb.

I have a portable 500gb hdd which will go in the box if I get a 2TB desktop, but am afraid it wont fit. I no longer wish to buy USB drives, but SD instead as the original wedding and family photos could be backed up and SD placed in the box; so I get 2 for 1 price.
Good idea, or do SD cards lose data faster than USB?


#2

I wouldn’t trust any type of flash storage by itself for long term archives. If the data is small enough to fit onto a CD, burn the data to Taiyo Yuden CD’s as well as the flash drives. Or use good DVD’s like Taiyo Yuden 8x, or Verbatim 16x…or both. Store the discs in individual cases.
Test the integrity of your stored data on a regular basis, say every six months.

Never use just one form of storage for irreplaceable data. The hdd is a good idea too, if it will fit.


#3

[QUOTE=Kerry56;2753992]I wouldn’t trust any type of flash storage by itself for long term archives.

Never use just one form of storage for irreplaceable data. The hdd is a good idea too, if it will fit.[/QUOTE]

I understand the second part, but why not the flash storage?

(BTW, this question also asked on another thread)


#4

My brother found an old 2GB SD card that wouldn’t open for him, so he asked me to check. It wouldn’t open in “Computer” and just a quick command line test:

A quick check in “GetDataBack for FAT” (data recovery utility):

He said it worked fine when he last used it, but due to its small size, it was just laying in a drawer for a few years. He didn’t remember what was on it, but would have been a problem had it been used to back up data. On the other hand, it was a “KeyMem 2GB”, not a well known brand.




#5

@thor21344
I have read (not confirmed) that flash drives use tiny capacitors that keep an electrical charge for the device, and this charge dissipates over time. Personal experience has made me wary of flash, as I’ve seen far too many become corrupted and unreadable.

Going back to the original question, there are other choices I didn’t mention. M discs are one, cloud storage (as one of several backup strategies) is another.


#6

Thanks Kerry, Being an Electronics Tech (radio/ telephony Lic.) when I studied Integrated Circuits (IC) that is also what I was told. Just like the old Vacuum tubes. On or Off. and they could over time degrade I guess


#7

Think of how cheap CD -Rs are if it’s important or irreplaceable 4 or 5 of those of different but known good brands could be burned & stored . Just in case. Then some other methods as well .
I’ve had good luck with external hard drives . So far I’ve never had one fail.
I’m much less trusting of flash or SD cards. Those are great for temp storage or even longer term unimportant storage.
The M discs seem like they would be good but I’ve never used one.


#8

The problems:
FLASH media - fade … there was a recent article about SSD fade.
Hard disk - mechanical, electrical and magnetic damage, component age failure.
Magnetic media (eg. tape) - magnetic issues, aging of tape, obsolescence or misalignment of drive.
CD/DVD media - aging issues.

Putting away a “forever” copy is not a good idea, backups need to be cycled - for live data, Grandfather, Father, Son - and for retained data, a test read and reserve copy - ideally hold two copies of different age or media type at a secure location and an additional local copy.


#9

^ Agreed. Revisit your stuff over time to refresh it onto newer media (& to check that it’s all still intact in the first place!).

As for using SD cards as extended-life storage: the comments above align with my thoughts; it’s not worth it. I definitely don’t think you’ll immediately lose data, but when something like an SD card dies, it tends to be pretty thorough in its failure. Something like an SSD might work a bit better, due to increased design tolerances and durability. A USB flash drive’s design could fall anywhere between the design of an SD card & the design of an SSD drive, but at the end, that too is designed more for day-to-day use with plenty of read/write cycles but a not-so-great life expectancy.

For extended storage, putting the contents onto a magnetic drive as well as optical storage for immediate, speedy retrieval would be my preference, with a decent look into cloud services when time/money/Internet connection permit its use as a viable medium (should things be that important to you, without any major security risks posed by putting your things on a remote server).


#10

Burn your data to optical media of good quality,try to use Nero’s SecurDisc or Plextor’s Powerec and store your discs in a black box…


#11

[QUOTE=roadworker;2754067]Burn your data to optical media of good quality,try to use Nero’s SecurDisc or Plextor’s Powerec and store your discs in a black box…[/QUOTE] Wouldn’t using Nero SecurDisc just lock you into having to use their software to read anything from that disc in the future, thus decreasing the chance of retrieving files if something bad happens to the disc, because other data recovery tools cannot be used?


#12

[QUOTE=DrageMester;2754070]Wouldn’t using Nero SecurDisc just lock you into having to use their software to read anything from that disc in the future, thus decreasing the chance of retrieving files if something bad happens to the disc, because other data recovery tools cannot be used?[/QUOTE]

You have a point,but it depends on how a person interprets it…You can burn the best media with a great burner and a great software package,and then hope for the best if something went wrong, using IsoBuster or similar tools to try to recover your files.
Or you can use SecurDisc to add an extra layer of data protection directly from the beginning…


#13

[QUOTE=Matth;2754063]The problems:
FLASH media - fade … there was a recent article about SSD fade.
Hard disk - mechanical, electrical and magnetic damage, component age failure.
Magnetic media (eg. tape) - magnetic issues, aging of tape, obsolescence or misalignment of drive.
CD/DVD media - aging issues.

Putting away a “forever” copy is not a good idea, backups need to be cycled - for live data, Grandfather, Father, Son - and for retained data, a test read and reserve copy - ideally hold two copies of different age or media type at a secure location and an additional local copy.[/QUOTE]

Forever copies do not exist. Every material degrades, though more expensive and rare metals tend to degrade after a whole lot of time.

The best forever copy strategy is kinda like this:

Make 2 copies on each current latest generation media technology and 2 copies on previous generation media technology. Do this ever year. It also makes sure that you have the best chance in actually have a reading device to read your data.

As of today, i think that would require a quality ssd. a quality usb device and a quality sd card for current media technology. For previous generation it would require writable discs, tape and an old usb drive.


#14

With regard to flash media and it’s need to be refreshed here’s an idea:

Put an SD card inside and older (but with good battery condition) mobile phone. Keep it either plugged into AC adapter or swap a charged battery inside it. I do not however know whether the flash would be refreshed if the phone is completely off so booting it once in a while should refresh the flash charge.


#15

[QUOTE=Matth;2754063]Putting away a “forever” copy is not a good idea, backups need to be cycled.[/QUOTE]

Now that’s a good advice!