Roxio RecordNow! Review

vbimport

#1

I just posted the article Roxio RecordNow! Review.

RecordNow is one of the latest offerings from Roxio aimed at the quick and easy burning market. It has a number of features to copy and burn CD’s all with easy to follow instructions. In this review we are going to see how these features perform.

Read the full article here:  [http://www.cdfreaks.com/review/85-Roxio-RecordNow-Review/](http://www.cdfreaks.com/review/85-Roxio-RecordNow-Review/)

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#2

slm


#3

gfgfhggfhghgfhgh


#4

AAAA


#5

thanks


#6

There are lots of people out there who have been collecting music for some time. Personally, for example, I have had a collection of LP’s (There’s nothing like The Who in vinyl!), cassette tapes, and probably hundreds of CD’s. In the past few years, I’ve also built up a respectable amount of MP3’s and AAC music. While having plenty of music is great, the problem starts to become that I can only listen to CD’s on my cdplayer, LP’s on my record player, and MP3’s on my IPod. If this sounds familiar, then Roxio’s “Record Now Music Lab” is targeted just for you. Record Now Music Lab is a one-stop application which allows you to manage all your music from one place. It provides all the tools you might need to centralize your music collection on your computer. From there, you can copy it to the mp3 player of your choice. You can also use the digital copies as a backup for your CD’s in case they become scratched or lost. In my case, though, I like the convenience of not having to juggle hundreds of CD’s, and after using Music Lab to digitize my music, I can put my CD’s into storage. Music Lab runs on any PC computer which can run Windows 2000 or XP. One thing to note is that it doesn’t provide any features or functionality which you can’t accomplish using free tools or utilities. What it does do well, however, is to provide all this functionality in one location, which makes it very easy to perform tasks. Music Lab is capable of taking your CD’s and turning them into MP3’s directly. It can detect the CD and Track information of the CD you insert, and will automatically include that in the mp3 metadata. This is a nice feature, and it makes importing CD’s (probably one of the most commonly-used functions) a breeze. In addition to MP3, Music Lab supports converting MP3’s to AAC (Apple’s ITunes format) and OGG, which is a new open format which provides superior quality to MP3, although few players support it so far. Music Lab can import your LP’s, cassette tapes, or potentially any other format via your sound card’s audio input jack. You will probably have to purchase a special “male-male” audio cable in order to connect the output on your player to the input on your computer, although these cables should be available inexpensively at most home audio or computer stores. One thing to be careful of is that your computer supports stereo input. Most computers do, but some of the budget-oriented PC’s only support mono sound in. The only drawback in this case is that your mp3’s will not have separate left and right channels. The Music Lab software has some basic filtering capabilities, which are able to take out some of the static hiss on older cassette tapes and LP’s. Some additional features which help to achieve all your audio-goals from Music Lab are that you can transfer songs to many cell phones to use as ring-tones, and also that you can then burn your music back to audio CD’s. This latter can be useful for creating your own custom CD mixes for parties or long car rides. The bottom line for Roxio’s RecordNow 9 Music Lab is that it is a solid, centralized application for managing and converting all your purchased music. More advanced computer users might be better served to find free applications which only provide the specific functionality they intend to use, and thereby save the purchase price Users who are looking for a simple, no There are lots of people out there who have been collecting music for some time. Personally, for example, I have had a collection of LP’s (There’s nothing like The Who in vinyl!), cassette tapes, and probably hundreds of CD’s. In the past few years, I’ve also built up a respectable amount of MP3’s and AAC music. While having plenty of music is great, the problem starts to become that I can only listen to CD’s on my cdplayer, LP’s on my record player, and MP3’s on my IPod. If this sounds familiar, then Roxio’s “Record Now Music Lab” is targeted just for you. Record Now Music Lab is a one-stop application which allows you to manage all your music from one place. It provides all the tools you might need to centralize your music collection on your computer. From there, you can copy it to the mp3 player of your choice. You can also use the digital copies as a backup for your CD’s in case they become scratched or lost. In my case, though, I like the convenience of not having to juggle hundreds of CD’s, and after using Music Lab to digitize my music, I can put my CD’s into storage. Music Lab runs on any PC computer which can run Windows 2000 or XP. One thing to note is that it doesn’t provide any features or functionality which you can’t accomplish using free tools or utilities. What it does do well, however, is to provide all this functionality in one location, which makes it very easy to perform tasks. Music Lab is capable of taking your CD’s and turning them into MP3’s directly. It can detect the CD and Track information of the CD you insert, and will automatically include that in the mp3 metadata. This is a nice feature, and it makes importing CD’s (probably one of the most commonly-used functions) a breeze. In addition to MP3, Music Lab supports converting MP3’s to AAC (Apple’s ITunes format) and OGG, which is a new open format which provides superior quality to MP3, although few players support it so far. Music Lab can import your LP’s, cassette tapes, or potentially any other format via your sound card’s audio input jack. You will probably have to purchase a special “male-male” audio cable in order to connect the output on your player to the input on your computer, although these cables should be available inexpensively at most home audio or computer stores. One thing to be careful of is that your computer supports stereo input. Most computers do, but some of the budget-oriented PC’s only support mono sound in. The only drawback in this case is that your mp3’s will not have separate left and right channels. The Music Lab software has some basic filtering capabilities, which are able to take out some of the static hiss on older cassette tapes and LP’s. Some additional features which help to achieve all your audio-goals from Music Lab are that you can transfer songs to many cell phones to use as ring-tones, and also that you can then burn your music back to audio CD’s. This latter can be useful for creating your own custom CD mixes for parties or long car rides. The bottom line for Roxio’s RecordNow 9 Music Lab is that it is a solid, centralized application for managing and converting all your purchased music. More advanced computer users might be better served to find free applications which only provide the specific functionality they intend to use, and thereby save the purchase price Users who are looking for a simple, no There are lots of people out there who have been collecting music for some time. Personally, for example, I have had a collection of LP’s (There’s nothing like The Who in vinyl!), cassette tapes, and probably hundreds of CD’s. In the past few years, I’ve also built up a respectable amount of MP3’s and AAC music. While having plenty of music is great, the problem starts to become that I can only listen to CD’s on my cdplayer, LP’s on my record player, and MP3’s on my IPod. If this sounds familiar, then Roxio’s “Record Now Music Lab” is targeted just for you. Record Now Music Lab is a one-stop application which allows you to manage all your music from one place. It provides all the tools you might need to centralize your music collection on your computer. From there, you can copy it to the mp3 player of your choice. You can also use the digital copies as a backup for your CD’s in case they become scratched or lost. In my case, though, I like the convenience of not having to juggle hundreds of CD’s, and after using Music Lab to digitize my music, I can put my CD’s into storage. Music Lab runs on any PC computer which can run Windows 2000 or XP. One thing to note is that it doesn’t provide any features or functionality which you can’t accomplish using free tools or utilities. What it does do well, however, is to provide all this functionality in one location, which makes it very easy to perform tasks. Music Lab is capable of taking your CD’s and turning them into MP3’s directly. It can detect the CD and Track information of the CD you insert, and will automatically include that in the mp3 metadata. This is a nice feature, and it makes importing CD’s (probably one of the most commonly-used functions) a breeze. In addition to MP3, Music Lab supports converting MP3’s to AAC (Apple’s ITunes format) and OGG, which is a new open format which provides superior quality to MP3, although few players support it so far. Music Lab can import your LP’s, cassette tapes, or potentially any other format via your sound card’s audio input jack. You will probably have to purchase a special “male-male” audio cable in order to connect the output on your player to the input on your computer, although these cables should be available inexpensively at most home audio or computer stores. One thing to be careful of is that your computer supports stereo input. Most computers do, but some of the budget-oriented PC’s only support mono sound in. The only drawback in this case is that your mp3’s will not have separate left and right channels. The Music Lab software has some basic filtering capabilities, which are able to take out some of the static hiss on older cassette tapes and LP’s. Some additional features which help to achieve all your audio-goals from Music Lab are that you can transfer songs to many cell phones to use as ring-tones, and also that you can then burn your music back to audio CD’s. This latter can be useful for creating your own custom CD mixes for parties or long car rides. The bottom line for Roxio’s RecordNow 9 Music Lab is that it is a solid, centralized application for managing and converting all your purchased music. More advanced computer users might be better served to find free applications which only provide the specific functionality they intend to use, and thereby save the purchase price


#7

I hate this G.D. program. No matter what disc I try to use this piece of crap program tells me the disc is not available. These guys suck ass