"Roll your own" Superbit?

vbimport

#1

Superbit – stripping away all the fluff and devoting the space to video quality & a higher bit rate – always seemed like a good idea to me. I’ve also read about how it could fail to live up to its billing due to the use of a poor transfer, and in some cases, only six out of 8.5 gigs being used on a dual layer disc.

So it occurred to me that if you had your own hi-def player, you might be able to take the very detailed image available in that format, and use whatever compression settings, bitrate, etc., that you wanted, and create a full 8.5 gig DVD that was better than anything you could buy in the store for the standard DVD format.

Is this a crazy idea?


#2

In other words rip a BluRay disc to your pc and re-encode it to dvd. Thing is some movie’s would still not fill a dual layer disc due to there run time and the fact that a dvd’s combined max bitrate of the audio and video is 9.8mb.

So if your dvd had a run time of say 80 minutes, audio was 5.1 448kbps then the max bitrate for your video would be 9352 it think that even if you set your avg bitrate to say 8800 you may not fill a dual layer still.

Not a crazy idea no but imo a waste of time, if you have the player and the movie on bluray why bother. The only reason i could see a point for doing this is if you had a portable dvd player for on your travels or in a car.


#3

[QUOTE=Jedi Master Yoda;2112694]Not a crazy idea no but imo a waste of time, if you have the player and the movie on bluray why bother. The only reason i could see a point for doing this is if you had a portable dvd player for on your travels or in a car.[/QUOTE]I can imagine a number of scenarios where it might be relevant. One is what you mentioned – My ThinkPad 770 can play DVDs just fine, but is far too old to have had any bluray capability.

And there are a few folks like me that don’t actually have a 1080p TV, but are making do with a progressive scan DVD player, or perhaps are looking at the new Toshiba XD-E500. That’s a bit fuzzy in terms of DRM though.

I am more interested in what is possible or effective than the obvious answer of just dumping dollars on the problem and buying bluray media and the most expensive hi-rez widescreen you can find.


#4

im not sure, but seems to me that Jedi Master Yoda may have confused Superbit.

my sincere apologies if i am wrong. :bow:

“Roll your own” Superbit?

In other words rip a BluRay disc to your pc and re-encode it to dvd.

however Jedi Master Yoda’s explanation does seem quite relevant.

Thing is some movie’s would still not fill a dual layer disc due to there run time and the fact that a dvd’s combined max bitrate of the audio and video is 9.8mb.

So if your dvd had a run time of say 80 minutes, audio was 5.1 448kbps then the max bitrate for your video would be 9352 it think that even if you set your avg bitrate to say 8800 you may not fill a dual layer still.

and my help to explain your concern

fail to live up to its billing due to the use of a poor transfer, and in some cases, only six out of 8.5 gigs being used on a dual layer disc.

if one could take a standard dvd and upconvert the video to higher bitrate before burning, i would not do it. i only use single layer media and am very happy with the results.


#5

[QUOTE=troy512;2112859]im not sure, but seems to me that Jedi Master Yoda may have confused Superbit.

my sincere apologies if i am wrong. :bow:[/QUOTE]
That’s cool but I do know what superbit is as i have one myself but i assume the original poster meant to convert a BluRay to DVD but use a high bitrate for the dvd as superbits do to get a better picture than that of a normal retail. I assumed he meant BluRay as he stated “hi-def player, you might be able to take the very detailed image available in that format”.

By all means just give it a go, can’t hurt to try although if you mean re-encoding a normal dvd to dvd but with a higher bitrate i wouldn’t bother as it’s not going to improve what’s already there.