Ripping and streaming Blu-rays - ready for prime-time yet?

For quite a while now I’ve been ripping my standard-def DVDs to ISO files, storing them on a hard-drive connected to an always-on desktop computer, and streaming them to multiple classic XBox’s running XBMC. It all works quite well, but I do feel that I’m missing out by not getting the added resolution that I could be getting with Blu-ray. I periodically check in on what’s required for downconverting Blu-ray movies to a smaller-sized format, but it seems like it requires too much manual intervention and time, and I’m spoiled by my current process of ripping standard-def DVDs as-is in about 20 minutes.

So I’m thinking that with hard drive storage costs coming down all the time, I might be able to live with ripping a Blu-ray as-is (no downconversion, but dropping unwanted audio tracks, etc.) and dealing with the 25GB-or-so per-movie storage requirements.

Now, as I mentioned earlier, I use classic XBox’s running XBMC. I realize that these devices won’t be up to the task, and I don’t want to spend $300 or more on a fully powered desktop computer for each room (or deal with the added noise that they’ll bring), so I may decide to give up the niceties of XBMC and just go with whatever the cheapest option there is that’s capable of playing Blu-ray quality files streamed over ethernet.

So, having said all that, I’ve got two questions:

  1. Is DVD Fab’s Blu-ray ripping up-to-snuff yet? Can it handle ripping even protected (BD+) discs yet? How long does it take to rip? If I drop off unwanted audio tracks, what do typical new releases seem to take up storage-wise?

  2. What are the cheapest ethernet streaming devices available that can play these files?

Thanks,

Scott

[QUOTE=Scott R;2414922]For quite a while now I’ve been ripping my standard-def DVDs to ISO files, storing them on a hard-drive connected to an always-on desktop computer, and streaming them to multiple classic XBox’s running XBMC. It all works quite well, but I do feel that I’m missing out by not getting the added resolution that I could be getting with Blu-ray. I periodically check in on what’s required for downconverting Blu-ray movies to a smaller-sized format, but it seems like it requires too much manual intervention and time, and I’m spoiled by my current process of ripping standard-def DVDs as-is in about 20 minutes.

So I’m thinking that with hard drive storage costs coming down all the time, I might be able to live with ripping a Blu-ray as-is (no downconversion, but dropping unwanted audio tracks, etc.) and dealing with the 25GB-or-so per-movie storage requirements.

Now, as I mentioned earlier, I use classic XBox’s running XBMC. I realize that these devices won’t be up to the task, and I don’t want to spend $300 or more on a fully powered desktop computer for each room (or deal with the added noise that they’ll bring), so I may decide to give up the niceties of XBMC and just go with whatever the cheapest option there is that’s capable of playing Blu-ray quality files streamed over ethernet.

So, having said all that, I’ve got two questions:

  1. Is DVD Fab’s Blu-ray ripping up-to-snuff yet? Can it handle ripping even protected (BD+) discs yet? How long does it take to rip? If I drop off unwanted audio tracks, what do typical new releases seem to take up storage-wise?

  2. What are the cheapest ethernet streaming devices available that can play these files?

Thanks,

Scott[/QUOTE]

Hi Scott R.
your answer to question number one is …

Yes it is up to snuff for ripping, and no it can not do BD+ yet ( hopefully soon though, fingers x ) as it is not supported…

as far as how long it takes to rip, depends on your systems components… on my system I can rip 40G’s in about 35 - 40 minutes, 25G’s in about half that time…

typically, even removing unwanted audio tracks, with new movies, the size is varied, it can range from the high 20’s to the high 40’s gig wise…

as for question number two, that I don,t know, as I burn all my Blu-ray back ups to disc, (to much info to store without a huge HD),there fore eliminating any need to stream…
but I bet some one here can probably help you with the Ethernet streaming issue…

:smiley:

For HD quality playback with silent operation I can recommend the Popcorn Hour line of media devices:

http://www.popcornhour.com/

I have the original PCH A-100 without a hard drive to stream to the bedroom TV at 1080p. I don’t do Blu-Ray yet but the forums report that M2TS files work.

Before investing in BD movies, you may want to consider trying a good DVD upscaler. The PCH does an OK job of upscalling to 1080p. My PS3 does an excellent job of upscaling but has a lot of fan noise which can be heard in the quiet moments of the movie. Both of these are doing hardware based upscaling (on a chip). I can tell the difference between Blu-Ray and an original DVD if I’m looking for it on my 52 inch 1080p TV, but once I’m engrossed in the movie I no longer notice. There are also many more media streamers on the market now that I haven’t tried.