Research: You still like to own Blu-ray and DVD discs

vbimport

#1

Research: You still like to own Blu-ray and DVD discs.

[newsimage]http://static.rankone.nl/images_posts/2012/12/fS6EVr.png[/newsimage]


Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/research-you-still-like-to-own-blu-ray-and-dvd-discs-65938/](http://www.myce.com/news/research-you-still-like-to-own-blu-ray-and-dvd-discs-65938/)


Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

Indeed, we will still see DVDs/BRDs for some time. The fastest way to supercede either of these would probably be with solid-state ROM cartridges, since they’re faster and immune to damage from scratches/fingerprints. That probably won’t happen, though, since digital downloads are becoming more common.


#3

How’s this … bluray/dvd can be lent to a friend/sibling/parent/colleague …
Try doing that with a digital download.


#4

PROS of physical media

  • You get the best video & audio quality. Streaming video sucks.
  • Very affordable. Most of my Blu-ray movies cost between $4 and $12.
  • Familiarity. You’ve been buying video tapes and DVDs for years.
  • You can lend them to family and friends.
  • You can use MakeMKV to rip and save to HDD. Playback later from HTPC or WD TV Live
  • They look awesome all lined up on a shelf.

CONS of physical media

  • You actually have to leave your house to go get 'em, unless you buy online.
  • They usually cost more than digital downloads.

#5

I like the physical media too. I would much rather rip my own disk and know I have the original optical disk as a back up.

PS: Doorbell rang…UPS Guy delivering Bob Dylan’s ‘Self Portrait’ CD…Got the Amazon instant download deal and the hard copy for $4.99…The MP3 D/L only was $9.99…:eek:


#6

[QUOTE=DukeNukem;2675496]CONS of physical media

  • They usually cost more than digital downloads.[/QUOTE]
    … in the usa …

Here in Oz, it’s often cheaper to buy Blurays/DVD’s from the UK / USA and have them shipped, than it is to stream over-compressed video streams from the local mobs …

It’s commonly cheaper to buy an entire movie collection from the UK/USA than it is to just buy the most recent movie only here in Oz …


#7

A few more pros of physical media:

[ul]
[li]You can sell off unwanted discs as well as buy second hand titles.
[/li][li]No buffering issues - Many Irish ISPs connections only handle 1-3Mbps, such as mine.
[/li][li]No Internet usage - Rural areas here typically have a 30GB/month cap
[/li][li]You don’t lose your movies if the shop goes out of business or shuts down their DRM servers.
[/li][/ul]

Much the same is true for CDs also.

In my opinion, whether for movies or music, the difference between a buying a disc and a download is like the difference between buying an original painting and a copy.


#8

For me, physical media will always be the way to go. Streaming or downloaded video will never match the quality of its physical counterpart. Unless it is a 1:1 rip I am not interested in digital media.


#9

I’ve never met anyone who dreams of moving to an urban jungle as their idyllic get-away. Instead, I hear “wide open spaces” and “wilderness” and “islands”.

None of which can be counted on for good broadband service. So the idea of “downloading” and staying wired into the grid has some serious considerations.

“I can take it with me when I move to my little island” or mountain cabin or some farm, far away from the megapolis’ freeways.

Ownership of the disk, a book, whatever lets me enjoy my entertainment on my schedule, not DRM’s or any other subscriber-net.


#10

do not have blu-ray


#11
  1. I like to collect things. At one point it was CD’s, then it was DVD’s, now its Blurays (and some vinyl).

  2. I don’t trust online content providers. You don’t know which ones will change your viewing rights, go bankrupt or leave.

  3. Physical formats are still the easiest format to lend people, use in different places etc… the only other thing that compares are pirated copies. Digital copies with DRM are nearly useless.


#12

I guess what we’re really talking about here, folks, is freedom. Freedom to do whatever you damn well want to do with the movies and music you buy. Freedom from the shackles of DRM and the studios telling you how you can watch or listen to content. The point is that nobody is going to tell me what to do with my purchase. If I want to buy a Blu-ray movie or music CD and then rip it to my HTPC, WD TV Live, notebook, netbook, tablet, or phone then that’s my business. If I want to sell it when I’m done, then it should be my right to recoup some of the money I spent on it. If I want to lend it to a friend, then it’s not the MPAA or RIAA’s business. That’s just my two cents.


#13

Duke, absolutely. This “world wide web” has all the strangulation and predatory abilities that real-world web’s have and, frankly, I’m more fearful of commerce’s predation on me than gov’t’s.

Their intent on limiting MY choice of entertainment on MY schedule and MY location has been obvious for a while (DVD ‘regions’, PAL vs NTSC segregation, DRM ‘24-hours to view’ limits, etc.).


#14

[QUOTE=ChristineBCW;2675610]Their intent on limiting MY choice of entertainment on MY schedule and MY location has been obvious for a while (DVD ‘regions’, PAL vs NTSC segregation, DRM ‘24-hours to view’ limits, etc.).[/QUOTE]

Don’t forget my personal favourite…

“Sorry, sucker, but no soup for you today. You can’t watch this online video because you’re not lucky enough to live in the great U S of freakin’ A”.

Ultrasurf has my back, TYVM. :slight_smile:


#15

I must admit there’s a certain satisfaction in holding a physical product in your hands.

Also there’s a greater feeling of possession with physical media than digital content.

I know these are just psychological factors but psychology influences buying decisions a lot.

[B]Wombler[/B]


#16

I still like the Real CD, the Real Liner Notes, the Real Artwork. But then, I still prefer LPs just for the artwork, too. I think they might keep the CD format but stick them in the full-size LP cardboard. Much more difficult to shoplift, therefore, great size for artwork AND much less jewel-case plastic for landfills! I have a feeling REVOLVER and Santana albums wouldn’t have been nearly as interesting with the teeny artwork of CD cases.


#17

[QUOTE=ChristineBCW;2675760]I still like the Real CD, the Real Liner Notes, the Real Artwork. But then, I still prefer LPs just for the artwork, too. I think they might keep the CD format but stick them in the full-size LP cardboard. Much more difficult to shoplift, therefore, great size for artwork AND much less jewel-case plastic for landfills! I have a feeling REVOLVER and Santana albums wouldn’t have been nearly as interesting with the teeny artwork of CD cases.[/QUOTE]

One of.the best ways to.learn About jazz and the artist is to read the liner notes off the old blue note and impulse/riverside/contemporary/prestige liner notes. also the session pictures taken by alber wolff? for blue note were fantastic. the japanese 20 and 24 bit remastered jazz cds are often in mini LP format. it preserves the Artwork and the liner notes.


#18

[QUOTE=Zod;2675547]1) I like to collect things. At one point it was CD’s, then it was DVD’s, now its Blurays (and some vinyl).

  1. I don’t trust online content providers. You don’t know which ones will change your viewing rights, go bankrupt or leave.

  2. Physical formats are still the easiest format to lend people, use in different places etc… the only other thing that compares are pirated copies. Digital copies with DRM are nearly useless.[/QUOTE]

I couldn’t agree more those are three valid points that the studios are trying to kill so you will be hamstrunged to their bankers. Why else would they say streaming is better - better for whom not the users for sure… :Z


#19

[QUOTE=Wombler;2675746]I must admit there’s a certain satisfaction in holding a physical product in your hands.

Also there’s a greater feeling of possession with physical media than digital content.

I know these are just psychological factors but psychology influences buying decisions a lot.

[B]Wombler[/B][/QUOTE]

Not only that but when the content is no longer available or can’t be found where else but the physical medium if you still own it will you have and be able to use it. That is the one big elephant in the room they don’t tell you about when all is gone and no one has it what then? Physical mediums will be the last places those will be and those whom has it still will be a GOD send to those whom can’t find it anymore online or streaming.


#20

I’ve had so many different formats now it’s ridicules. Just like the fact I have a machine that will play about any audio or video format that was popular, and a few obscure ones as well.
I’ve got two SVHS decks, two reel to reel decks, a few standalone DVD recorders, one with a hard drive built in, a DAT audio deck, a couple of good quality turntable including a B&O linear tracker that is a work of art I found cheap at a garage sale, a couple of media players to network all my PC type formats all over the house or play the audio and video ISO’s of disks I own, a nice 3 head cassette deck on loan to my step dad, a couple of Laser disk players, and probably a few others I’ve forgotten.
I’d never have the room right now to set all of them up but I got em if needed:cool:
I like at least having a real physical media of things I own, even if I then convert it to something and end up playing that on the media players at least I have a backup that can never die, just like everyone else here says.