Reseachers: All Smart TVs spy on you, Sony monitors all channel switches

vbimport

#1

We’ve just posted the following news: Reseachers: All Smart TVs spy on you, Sony monitors all channel switches[newsimage]http://static.myce.com//images_posts/2012/01/lg_google_tv.jpg[/newsimage]

All Smart TV manufacturers monitor what you watch and what your interests are, according to a report from Dutch researchers. And you give them permission to do so when you accept their privacy terms. What data they collect and for what reason is hidden in unclear legalese and wordy texts.

            Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/reseachers-all-smart-tvs-spy-on-you-sony-monitors-all-channel-switches-72851](http://www.myce.com/news/reseachers-all-smart-tvs-spy-on-you-sony-monitors-all-channel-switches-72851)

            Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

Another “win” for End User License Agreements that you cannot say no to.

Someone somewhere is probably writing a EULA right now that gives them the rights to take first-born children and harvest organs from the end-user… if this hasn’t already happened.


#3

Like any contract EULA’s should be completely unenforceable in any legal context without an actual signature before you finalize a purchase of any product that contains one. This means at the register with ample time to review the legalese and the ability to have a lawyer present.

Contracts without signatures should be null and void, period. I’m now sure how we entered into this legal bizarro world where EULA’s hold any weight what-so-ever, but any judge setting precedents where they do should be thrown in jail for corrupting due process and basic law and order.

Hey your honor, my cat stepped on my mouse and clicked OK when i wasn’t looking. I never even saw the EULA or knew there was one.


#4

I’ve never been so happy to own “dumb” TVs with Rokus attached. Unless, of course, Roku is just as guilty as the others. I think I’d rather remain ignorant in that case.


#5

[QUOTE=Grim107;2738014]I’ve never been so happy to own “dumb” TVs with Rokus attached. Unless, of course, Roku is just as guilty as the others. I think I’d rather remain ignorant in that case.[/QUOTE]

I trust my Android based, Chinese made, mass produced media dongle to not spy on me more than any other streaming device I use.


#6

[QUOTE=UTR;2738017]I trust my Android based, Chinese made, mass produced media dongle to not spy on me more than any other streaming device I use.[/QUOTE]

Even if did spy, in theory it could only spy on what is watched through the Android device. For example, it cannot tell what channel you’re watching, what buttons you push on the TV remote, whether you mute or change channel during ad-breaks, etc.

Although our Sony TV has smart features, we probably only watched a single programme since the TV was purchased around 4 years ago. Pretty much everything we watch on demand is on a laptop connected by Chromecast. I’m not sure what Chromecast’s privacy is, such as whether it captures the URLs we visit or what programmes are natively cast through it, but I’m sure it doesn’t have access to how we use the TV and remote.


#7

Vizio gives you a way to opt out but never tell you you are in… http://www.vizio.com/smartinteractivity


#8

As a purveyer of fine TV’s, most of which are Smart, I’ve always suspected that this feature is used for nefarious purposes. My own smart TV has never been connected to the net even though it has a clearly marked “opt out” for information collection and sharing. The occasional firmware update is accomplished via a USB thumb drive.
While my TV isn’t telling anyone what my viewing preferences are the same can’t be said for the Cable Box or Satellite Box attached to said TV.
Short of buying DVDs/Blurays and paying cash for them and watching Peasant Vision, someone somewhere is going to know what’s on your TV.

We’ve all become “Nielson Families” without the bennefit of having Nielson pay for our Cable.


#9

I still love my old “dumb” TVs. If I ever want to any “smart” funtionality, I’ll probably just hook my TV up to a computer. It’s hard to spy on something designed to be free of any backdoors for big brother.


#10

Why not analyze data traffic (WireShark) and use a firewall to block outgoing traffic?


#11

[QUOTE=Mr. Belvedere;2738036]Why not analyze data traffic (WireShark) and use a firewall to block outgoing traffic?[/QUOTE]
I like that idea - Spy back on the TV. :slight_smile:

Another option is to not join the TV to any network. Not everybody has Internet access (e.g. a few of my neighbours), so the TV cannot be expected to require Internet access for watching over-the-air broadcasts or set top boxes.


#12

@TSJnachos117

I have a computer beside my TV and it does a hell of a lot more than netflix. I have a wifi dongle for my LG. Used it (and the smart tv) maybe 2 days.


#13

[QUOTE=Mr. Belvedere;2738036]Why not analyze data traffic (WireShark) and use a firewall to block outgoing traffic?[/QUOTE] That’s a way to avoid the spying, but WHY should it be necessary to resort to such measures? WHY should we accept that companies try to spy on us?