Report: Majority of data loss caused by failing HDD

vbimport

#1

We’ve just posted the following news: Report: Majority of data loss caused by failing HDD[newsimage]http://static.myce.com//images_posts/2014/07/HGST-SAS-HDD-95x75.jpg[/newsimage]

Crashed hard disks are the responsible for the majority of data loss, according to a report.

            Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/report-majority-of-data-loss-caused-by-failing-hdd-72289](http://www.myce.com/news/report-majority-of-data-loss-caused-by-failing-hdd-72289)

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#2

Isn’t this report like saying that water is responsible for most drownings?


#3

So, our largest data storage devices failing is responsible for most data loss. Quite a report.

As an aside, isn’t the point of RAID (besides striping) to be completely fault tolerant for one lost drive? If you’re losing data with RAID you’re incompetent and shouldn’t be using it in the first place.


#4

[QUOTE=ilnot1;2732811] If you’re losing data with RAID you’re incompetent and shouldn’t be using it in the first place.[/QUOTE]

If critical data isn’t backed up in the first place, you’ve already failed the intelligence test. [B]ALL[/B] data loss is human error.


#5

[QUOTE=ilnot1;2732811]So, our largest data storage devices failing is responsible for most data loss. Quite a report.

As an aside, isn’t the point of RAID (besides striping) to be completely fault tolerant for one lost drive? If you’re losing data with RAID you’re incompetent and shouldn’t be using it in the first place.[/QUOTE]

Everything has it’s weaknesses and you really need off site storage for critical data.

It’s all very well having RAID etc but if your house burns down or is struck by lightning you can still lose everything despite correctly configured systems.

Nothing is ever entirely foolproof but you can get close to it with strict backup regimes and multiple strategies.

[B]Wombler[/B]


#6

One thing I find interesting is just how many hours a hard disk clocks up over time.

The following is of my first 2TB HDD (WD RE4-GP), still in use:

A filament light bulb has an average life of 1000 hours, so if this was a lamp operated over this period, its bulb would likely have blown 26 times by this stage. :slight_smile:

My 240GB SanDisk Extreme SSD has so far clocked up 10,498 hours and still going strong.



#7

Aside from stating the obvious what seems to be missed is that modern drives aren’t built to the same quality standards as drives of old.
Saddly we, the consumer are to blame for this, as everybody wants Cheap, Cheap, Cheap!
Case in point, I have a circa 1986 286 with a Seagate ST225 (40 whole megs) that I fire up from time to time. The nearly 30 year old drive creaks and groans but still reliably boots the machine in living CGA. As memory recalls, this drive set me back $850.00 1986 dollars (about 2400 2014 dollars).


#8

The IBM is a 1999 Deskstar . Still works fine when I use the old computer. It has Windows 98SE installed on it & is a whopping 13.5GB HDSentinel reports it as12.6GB . Note the number of days on it. It doesn’t show temperature because it has no temperature sensor.



#9
  1. The article is silly.
  2. You can’t compare overall hdd reliability on your sample size of 1.
  3. Modem HDDs are much more reliable compared to 199xs hdds, there’s just orders of magnitude more of them. The last HDD I bought was $180, much reduced from your $2400.00. It’s also more energy efficient, faster and statistically less prone to data loss.

#10

The only time I bought a cheap drive, it died within a year, I returned it to what was then IBM and paid the shipping. After the replacement died for the third time, I gave up. Since then I’ve only bought WD enterprise drives and Samsung SSD’s
This machine is on 24/7 since the EVOs came out and the same with an 830 and it’s never had a drive problem. 1 video card died, but that’s it.
Of course, everything is still backed up.
My wife’s old Mesh PC uses some very old Seagate PATA drives that date from around 2002. That also still works when it’s occasionally booted up, it was used around 15 hours a day for many years until my wife discovered laptops.
It does seem that older drives were better made and these days, the the best bet seems to be the very expensive, but worth it enterprise verities.


#11

HDD’s are the best value these days for long term storage. That doesn’t mean that stuff you can’t afford to lose shouldn’t be backed up. You have plenty of choices these days from optical media, tape drives, online storage(cloud), and other HDD’s. An interesting study would be having redundant backups on HDD vs having redundant backups of of optical discs with same copies of optical discs. What I do sometimes when I backup media on Blu Ray, if there’s something I like that would be harder to replace is I’ll back it up on one disk and then back it up again on another… ya know…just incase… this is called staggered backups.
BTW, if a HDD line is crap… people WILL talk… these people aren’t sitting in silence… the info will get out there. What people should know is that 5tb+ hdd’s will have a usage lifespan that is somewhat shorter that when we are used to… (HAMR technology). You should adjust your upgrade schedule acordingly.