Reliable CD-RW Brand?

vbimport

#1

After a months-long hiatus imposed by poor health I’m going to tackle my CD back-up project again. In the interim I discovered that one of my favorite CDs is damaged and one of the tracks is now unplayable. So that disappointment has given me the impetus (read: “kick-in-the-butt”) that I needed to get back to work on this project.

My idea is to create CD-Rs of my favorite CDs and then to archive the originals and only use the CD-Rs for playing.

(I know! CD’s are so last century. But, then, so am I).

The last time I tried this back-up project I ended up with a bunch of burned CDs that had audio “burps” on them, within the first few seconds of the beginning of the CD. And I ended up with a box-full of coasters.

So, this time around, I want to experiment with CD-RWs until I get it right.

I’d be grateful for your recommendations of the most reliable brands of CD-RWs.


#2

This is a question for our Blank Media forum Clueless, so I’m moving your thread in there. I don’t use cdrw disks myself, so I can’t answer your question.


#3

Clueless In Seattle,

In my opinion, you should stay away from rewritable CD’s. Inherently their life span is far far lower than just an ordinary CD-R, and many players refuse to play rewritable CDs, in particular car stereos. Many of these rewritables are living coasters, and some of them refuse to erase even after one use (Memorex is often thought like this).

An even cheaper solution is to get 10pack CD-Rs from say ASDA or Tesco, and then do test burns for your music. Being supermarket CDs, don’t expect them to last long, but they can be got for less than £1.50 - Even the Maxell ones can! Once you’ve cracked it, then I would buy more of the same brand discs which you know works with your burner.


#4

I’ve had reasonably good luck with the Verbatim 16x-24x CD-RW discs but with that said, I only use them for disposable stuff such as making a compilation audio CD. As others have mentioned, they are inherently less reliable than standard CD-R discs. I wouldn’t put anything important on there.

I have had them playback successfully in a couple of different car stereos. However, I find these discs to be a lot more picky about which erase method you use. I couldn’t get them to play properly unless I did a full erase before rewriting whereas, for example, DVD-RW discs that I’ve had experience with seemed to work fine with either a full or quick erase.

Do keep in mind, again, as others have mentioned, certain players are pickier than others. So, unless you really need CD-RWs, you might be better off getting some cheap CD-Rs for testing. But if you decide you want CD-RWs, I can say the Verbatim ones work decently.


#5

Thanks for the caveats and suggestions, guys.

I’m afraid I’m one of those cranky old farts who is concerned about trashing the planet by tossing plastics into landfills, so that’s why I’d like to be able to use CD-RWs for test burns.

Before reading the suggestion to try Verbatim 16x-24x CD-RW discs I had already ordered from Amazon a spindle of Verbatim 2x-4x. What is the meaning of 2x-4x compared ot 16x-24x? Have I made a blunder? Should I send them back when they arrive?


#6

I understand.

Although it is curious why they say 2x - 4x, I can’t remember seeing those since the early 2000. Might the seller have made a mistake, where he meant to say 12x - 24x, but his 1 and 2 buttons don’t work on his keyboard? :bigsmile:


#7

[QUOTE=Clueless in Seattle;2593608]What is the meaning of 2x-4x compared ot 16x-24x?[/QUOTE] It means you’ll have time to watch an opera, walk the dog, and take a vacation to Greece, while waiting for your burn to finish. :smiley:

4x means that a 80min CD-RW will take approx. 20 minutes (80/4) to burn.


#8

Ack! I guess I did make a mistake in ordering these. So I guess I’ll take a hit to the PayPal account and end up sending them back.

In the meantime, since I’m committed, for the sake of our environment, to trying CD-RWs, in spite of the numerous limitations you guys have pointed out to me, I’d be grateful for a recommendation of a reliable brand that I could order from an online retailer. (I don’t have a car, and due to disabling chronic illness, have difficulty getting out to local retail stores these days).

P.S. Here’s a link to the product I ordered:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000BM3ZBI


#9

I’d suggest Verbatim 16-24x Ultra Speed CD-RW, although I haven’t used them for several years now - but they used to be quite reliable:

http://www.rima.com/prod/95174.html

Verbatim 32x might be slightly less compatible with burners, but they should be a little faster to burn.
(Rima doesn’t list them)


#10

Oh dear :doh:

But to answer your question, I believe that Verbatim seems to be the only reliable disc rewriting manufacturer. Anything other seems hit and miss, and based on users opinions, stay away from Memorex. How about Imation?


#11

[QUOTE=DrageMester;2593686]I’d suggest Verbatim 16-24x Ultra Speed CD-RW, although I haven’t used them for several years now - but they used to be quite reliable:[/QUOTE]

I see that Amazon has ten packs of those for $9.56 with free shipping if my order totals $25.

All of my computer and electronic equipment is hand-me-downs, so I’m wondering if my old antique CD burner could handle the 24x CD-RWs.

Is there a way I can check my burner to see if it’s up to the task?


#12

@ Chad_Bronson
Imation is the parent company for Memorex and several other brands, including TDK. I doubt you’ll see much difference between them on types of disks they sell.

@ Clueless
Which cd burner do you have?


#13

@ Clueless in Seattle,

Should your burner not be up to it, why replace like for like when you can rekit your computer out with a DVD Burner, or is your computer not powerful enough to be use one as such? :slight_smile:


#14

Don’t use CD-RW too much anymore… my main purpose was before flash & hard drive players became popular to use a cd audio player capable of mp3 & cd-rw compatability to have a few hundred tracks for a cheap price.
My brand of choice was TDK 16-24x & verbatims were also good too. I would not trust generics in the 16-24x category. go with the slower speeds if you buy budget discs. Even my generic 4x cd-rws lasted me 5 years. CD-RWs are sensitive to scratches, so be careful about protecitng the disc (and excessive sun/light exposure to the write side)


#15

[QUOTE=Chad_Bronson;2593738]@ Clueless in Seattle,

Should your burner not be up to it, why replace like for like when you can rekit your computer out with a DVD Burner, or is your computer not powerful enough to be use one as such? :)[/QUOTE]

My DVD burner, which I use for burning CDs, is an NEC ND-3550A DVD±R DL Drive.


#16

Unless it is worn or dusty, this drive might be even better than the latest stuff you can buy nowadays.

I am not sure if using CD-RW for your audio archive is a good idea at all. Admitted, a few might be helpful for you to learn how to deal with your software. But still then, your HiFi CD player might have serious problems playing these discs as already mentioned by other members.

The receipe for a good audio CD is:

[ol]
[li]a good CD writer (Your NEC should be okay, unless broken or dusty)
[/li][li]good blank media. My favourites are TY, Ritek and CMC made CD-R. I don’t trust CMC or RItek longevity, but at least there are only few readability problems with picky players.
[/li][li]write speed. 16x is good to start with, 24x can be okay also. A little bit “trial and error” can’t be avoided.
[/li][/ol]
Michael


#17

Many thanks, all of you who posted to this thread. I really appreciate all the help you’ve given me.

I returned the 2x-4x CD-RWs and replaced them with Verbatim 24x CD-RWs which I tried out yesterday and they seem to work fine (My ancient hand-me-down Denon DCD-1590 CD player is unable to read them, but my little Phillips bookshelf stereo does play them).

Now I can do test burns and not feel guilty about contributing to the trashing of our planet when I run into burning problems.

I’ve got lots more questions on a lot of different topics, so, as my health permits, I’m sure you’ll be seeing more posts from me in various forums in the near future.

Thanks again for your generosity in sharing your expertise and time with me, and especially for being so patient with this old duffer,


#18

[QUOTE=Clueless in Seattle;2594687]Many thanks, all of you who posted to this thread. I really appreciate all the help you’ve given me.

I returned the 2x-4x CD-RWs and replaced them with Verbatim 24x CD-RWs which I tried out yesterday and they seem to work fine (My ancient hand-me-down Denon DCD-1590 CD player is unable to read them, but my little Phillips bookshelf stereo does play them).

Now I can do test burns and not feel guilty about contributing to the trashing of our planet when I run into burning problems.

I’ve got lots more questions on a lot of different topics, so, as my health permits, I’m sure you’ll be seeing more posts from me in various forums in the near future.

Thanks again for your generosity in sharing your expertise and time with me, and especially for being so patient with this old duffer,[/QUOTE]

It was no worries, really. Here at Club MyCE, everyone, at least appears, to be friends, and we really do get a kick from helping others! Despite my amount of posts I’ve not been here long, only about a year or so, but others have been here for nearly a decade. :slight_smile:

If only I had your ethical attitude to disc burning, I must toss at least 5 discs a month! :doh: But I do admire your eco outlook at not wanting to toss discs purely because they are “failures”. Why not go all the way if possible from the optical disc to storing your music library on a big hard drive? :slight_smile: The waste in this sense will be far fewer than if you was to catalogue it on a blank disc.

I can’t say I’ve had fantastic experience with -RW, and I guess this is what’s put me off burning as such. But since CD-RW are going cheap, I might pick a few up :iagree: But, Clueless in Seattle, you’re more than welcome to drop me a message to talk about things - Lord knows I need some friends! :bigsmile: Remember, every member on here was once in your position.

Take care, Chad.


#19

[QUOTE=Chad_Bronson;2594704]Why not go all the way if possible from the optical disc to storing your music library on a big hard drive?[/QUOTE]

Hi again, Chad!

You must be psychic, because that’s exactly one of the questions I had in mind when I wrote that [I][B] “I’ve got lots more questions on a lot of different topics.”,[/B][/I]

So, maybe you could recommend which of the forums I should post in to ask questions bout how to “graduate” from CDs to HDs for home music.


#20

How about in the Newbie Section to get you started? :slight_smile:

PS - Although I know you meant hard drives, but is it possible to use the term “HDD” (Hard Disc Drive) instead of HD - Which to me (and probably many others) means High Definition? No worries, just thought I would clear something up :slight_smile:

Just a few word of warnings about transporting over to hard drive. Ideally you should use the hard drive as an archiving unit for music rather than just a quick listen to mp3 job, if you get me. I’ll keep it as basic as possible, but Being a bit of a music person myself I always recommend storing your music into a “lossless” (i.e. a format that stores identical to what is on the disc, eg FLAC or WAV) so if your original disc goes down, it’s no worries! You can just reburn it from the lossless file and have it identical.

Sorry for that wordy paragraph. :slight_smile: What is important however is to get a good hard drive. Why not a Seagate, or a Western Digital? :slight_smile: