Reliability of cheaper 'overprint' media

vbimport

#1

A quote from a website on overprint CD-Rs:

"What are overprints?

[i]When manufacturers are printing CD-R’s, there’s a certain percentage that get printed wrongly. The normal procedure is for these discs to be overprinted to cover the original error and they can then be sold.

The nature of these discs means that they may sometimes have been handled by people more than non-overprinted discs, so you may find fingerprints on some discs. [/I]"

Does anyone here have any direct experience or opinions based on the reliability of such media? On one hand, fingerprints are annoying, but a soft cloth would solve the problem.

Also, being overprinted, the disc would be thicker than usual. Is this a problem?

Finally, is it OK to clean a CD with a moist cloth? I read about lifespan testing of CDs in high humidity so presumably there must be some effect on the CD in terms of humidity. But what I don’t see is that the CD does not (apparently so, anyway) contain any water soluble substances. In fact, it is mostly made out of plastic which is impervious to water anyway. Can anyone explain the supposed environmental effect of water on a CD’s lifespan?


#2

Considering the widespread availability of high quality media at sale prices, why would one consider “el cheapo” media? My last 100ct of TY-48x were $9 US.
You can use anything you like to clean a CDR, as long as you don’t scratch it.


#3

Originally posted by rdgrimes
Considering the widespread availability of high quality media at sale prices, why would one consider “el cheapo” media? My last 100ct of TY-48x were $9 US.
You can use anything you like to clean a CDR, as long as you don’t scratch it.

Because, as usual, the UK consumer gets shafted when it comes to prices - even compared to the continental Europe markets (for just about everything from cars, wine, broadband access and computer hardware/media). Thats why you get Brits taking a ‘holiday’ in continental Europe to pick up wines, for example, because the trip + cost there < buying the stuff here. Anyway, we are better in some respects - like the most powerful Armed Forces in Western Europe :wink: - so I suppose it all works out on the big scheme of things. Compared to US consumer costs, UK consumer costs are obscene.

Anyway, to answer your question, the typical prices for cough “cheap” media in the UK is anywhere from £12-£20 (or about USD$20-30) for 100 80min CD-Rs, bulk packed. Anything less than £10 here for 100 CD-Rs is a steal, you only see that with your so called “el cheapo” media that has some defect (e.g. overprint, designed for 48x but rated at 40x, etc.)


#4

i just bought 50 overprint discs from blankdiskmedia.co.uk
I have written about 15 so far and none have become coasters (well one did but that was my fault, i unplugged a harddrive on the same IDE channel as the CDR whilst it was writing :slight_smile: )

I am only writing at 8x though because that is as fast as my writer goes :frowning:

They really were dirt cheap but the orginial disks are verbatim datalife ones which I believe are decent. I haven’t seen a single fingerprint or scratch so far and i have looked because of the message on the website. I think they are just covering themselves in case.
I do not know if the extra thickness could be bad at higher writing speeds though.

based on my experience i would definitely buy overprints again.
hope this is helpful
murphy


#5

Originally posted by rdgrimes
Considering the widespread availability of high quality media at sale prices, why would one consider “el cheapo” media? My last 100ct of TY-48x were $9 US.
You can use anything you like to clean a CDR, as long as you don’t scratch it.

:eek:. Uh, where did you find those . . . ?


#6

where did you find those . . .

BestBuy regularly has Fuji on sale at similar prices. I recently got TDK (RiTEC) 100ct spindles at CompUSA for the same price. Of course it usually involves a MIR.