Regular diesel / gasoline or V-power / Ultimate / Energy Supreme / Excellium

vbimport

#1

When at the gasstation I sometimes feel tempted to fill the tank with the more expensive / premium gasoline known as Shell V-Power, BP Ultimate, Esso Energy Supreme or Total Excellium.

I never really do it, because there is a price difference and I really wonder if it makes a difference. Anyone here that regularly uses it and notices any difference?


#2

Regular has the same BTU’s as Premium. The higher price is for the anti-knock compounds since they have taken the cheaper lead out that use to be used for anti- knock.


#3

Diesel is completly different so unless you have a diesel engine no need to discuss it.

Unless you have a high compression engine or have a turbo or super charged gasolene engine . Both end up with about the same results but use a different method to get there. Those may cause a “ping” or “knock” if regular gasolene is used. The “anti-knock” additives actually slow the burn down. That actually decreases efficiency unless you have one of the three engine types above.

That is about as simple as I can explain it .
If you are using regular gasolene & you are not getting a “ping” you are usually getting the best value & performance. If you are getting a slight ping . Have your mechanic slow the timing 2 or 3 degrees. Also try buying regular from a different station if you are getting ping because sometimes the gas is not really up to specs.


#4

I’ll be honest. I use the cheapest petrol I can find, which is usually at the local superstore, so regular for me.
Hubby’s car is a diesel, but I wouldn’t have a clue if he uses regular or premium.


#5

I’ve heard it doesn’t make a different Diesel fuel is in it’s own class by it’s self and unless you have an e-85 made car I don’t think it makes a whole lot of different except in small engines, than maybe a premium fuel for the small engines that you add oil to the fuel.Now corn is corn and I’m not a big fan of it, so I’ve heard most American gas has a certain amount in it and I try to stay away from as much corn additive as I can.
They say the ethanol eats the plastic parts in small engine carburetors I just replaced a carburetor on my rototiller.( cars have injectors now a day)


#6

The fuel stations around here only sell one type of petrol and one type of diesel for cars. My car takes diesel and one thing I’m fairly sure about is that the diesel mileage does vary from one provider to another and I know a few people who noticed similar variations as me, especially with Texaco.

When the fuel light flashes on my dashboard, it takes 42 litres to fill. I typically get 580 miles (~930km) on a full tank before the fuel warning LED. When I use to purchase fuel at one Texaco station, I got a fairly consistent 550 miles (~885km.) I use to buy my fuel there as it use to also be the cheapest, until one day the fuel prices came down and I ended up filling the tank somewhere else. The Texaco claims they add “Techron” and I’ve often wondered if they do this to ‘dilute’ the fuel, as I always got better mileage from diesel bought just about everywhere else.

The longest range I got before the warning is about 610 miles (~980km) and I think that was with diesel from a Topaz station, but then again their fuel is generally the most expensive. The fuel station I use now is at a fuel distributor which only sells diesel and despite being the cheapest, I get the decent ~580 miles on a tank. Another reason I buy there is that an assistant always fills the car, so no annoying diesel smell on my hands either.

As for diesel pricing around here, I pass roughly 10 fuel stations on my hour drive to work. The price currently ranges between 144.9c and 148.9c a litre. From what I recall, the fuel distributor is 142.9c a litre of diesel. I don’t know what the petrol prices are since I generally don’t check them.


#7

The reason to use the higher octane gasoline is because your engine has been designed to require it to keep it from detonating (i.e. “pinging”). The only way a car can benefit from higher octane from a performance and mileage aspect is it will allow more advanced engine timing to be used. Increasing timing improves mileage and makes more horsepower. However, the majority today’s cars will not be able to discern that high octane fuel has been put in the gas tank so it will not adjust the timing by itself. The vehicle’s computer can be reprogrammed for high octane fuel but then you will need to use it all the time. Also, there are some addon chips that will store multiple engine programs and then you can switch to a more agressive program when you use high octane fuel and another program when you don’t.

Point being, save your money and buy the fuel your car manufacturer recommends.

BTW, don’t put diesel in a gas engine or vice versa. The outcome will not be good.


#8

[QUOTE=cholla;2710074]If you are using regular gasolene & you are not getting a “ping” you are usually getting the best value & performance. [B]If you are getting a slight ping . Have your mechanic slow the timing 2 or 3 degrees.[/B] Also try buying regular from a different station if you are getting ping because sometimes the gas is not really up to specs.[/QUOTE]

If there is a “ping” then something is wrong with the engine in most cases. It could be anything from carbon build up in the cylinders to a to a hose or gasket leak. Also, be a faulty sensor.

Plus in today’s world of computer controlled engines, changing the timing would require the computer to be reprogrammed. It is not like the good old days of twisting on the distributor. :slight_smile:


#9

I’m sure on some cars the computer might override a timing change.
But I’m only talking about a small adjustment of 2 or 3 degrees.
Certainly a “ping” can have other causes .
That can usually be partly determined by getting another brand of the same grade gas . If that helps or hurts then the “ping” is more likely to be caused by octane.

One of the things a faulty sensor causes is an incorrect timing adjustment by the computer . I would be adjusting the timing myself & I would observe if the computer readjusted it.


#10

Happy, I’m a Tesla driver. Don’t have that “problem” of choosing. All electric… :slight_smile:

But then, our long distance drive car is still a VW Touareg 3.0 bmt diesel.


#11

[QUOTE=pinto2;2710102]Happy, I’m a Tesla driver. Don’t have that “problem” of choosing. All electric… :slight_smile:

But then, our long distance drive car is still a VW Touareg 3.0 bmt diesel.[/QUOTE]

Better look out that Tesla doesn’t give you an expensive hot seat.:smiley:


#12

Off topic.
Thanks Allan. Tesla made in US, is cheap here in SE thanks to low US$ exchange rate…
I’ve a lot off x-tras but not a heated chair… In the morning while car is charged I’ve an additional heater running at power supply from my garage… No x-tra cost. It’s in my rent.

BTW, electric cars get a tax subvention making them 30% cheaper then list price. The Tesla is cheaper to buy then our Touareg…
//off topic.


#13

[QUOTE=cholla;2710097]I’m sure on some cars the computer might override a timing change.
But I’m only talking about a small adjustment of 2 or 3 degrees.
Certainly a “ping” can have other causes .
That can usually be partly determined by getting another brand of the same grade gas . If that helps or hurts then the “ping” is more likely to be caused by octane.

One of the things a faulty sensor causes is an incorrect timing adjustment by the computer . I would be adjusting the timing myself & I would observe if the computer readjusted it.[/QUOTE]

I have seen many detonation issues result from carbon build up in the cylinders. This effectively raises the compression ratio for the engine. Buying the higher octane gas in this circumstance might be justified.

Nowadays engines don’t need tuneups in the classic sense just fluid and filter changes. Even sparks plugs will be good for well over 100k miles. The good old days of vehicle performance really weren’t all that good. Heck, a V-6 Camry could beat many 1960s muscle cars on the drag strip or road course.


#14

[QUOTE=pinto2;2710102][B]Happy, I’m a Tesla driver.[/B] Don’t have that “problem” of choosing. All electric… :slight_smile:

But then, our long distance drive car is still a VW Touareg 3.0 bmt diesel.[/QUOTE]

Keep an eye out for smoke. :wink:

How many miles do you get on a charge? How long to recharge?


#15

most modern cars have knock sensors so will adjust the timing automatically if you get pre ignition or ping as referred to earlier the V power petrol has a higher cetane rating so will give a slight increase in power (you can get the same using millers)
I tried this myself but have a diesel car and the computer showed a slight increase in mpg on mixed driving couldent really tell if performance was increased as the increase is small.
All petrol and diesel in the uk is to a minimum specification if you are after value for money buy the cheapest you can find


#16

[QUOTE=UTR;2710114]Keep an eye out for smoke. :wink:

How many miles do you get on a charge? How long to recharge?[/QUOTE]
I’ve Tesla-S, 85kWh [360hp] car, 0-60mph in sub 5.5 seconds.

Charging time with a 240V socket is abouth 9 to 10 hours.
While driving at 55 to 60mph I can get 230 to 260 miles with 15% reserve battery load, depending on teperature. In winthertime less.
At highway speed (70+mph) the safe limit is ~220 miles (sommertime).

Last winther I got low battery warning after 220 miles at 55mph with an outdoor temperature of -4F (-20C).


#17

It is usually carbon build up in the heads combustion chamber that causes preignition instead of what’s on the piston. Either can cause this but it is not due to an increase in compression. The carbon gets red hot easier than the metal & this sets off the gasolene too early.
Usually a lot of carbon indicates the engine is already burning oil . That means the oil ring is letting oil by & the compression rings are letting compression by one way & oil by the other.
I agree with the higher voltage spark plugs in theory can last 100000 miles.
The problem is the side electrode or ground wears out . It gets smaller & thiner.
This cause it also to get hotter than it should with engine heat & it will also cause preignition. In the worst case the spark can begin to jump to the piston to the point it burns a hole in it.

I don’t think a Camry could beat at least one muscle car a friend of mine used to drag here. Amarillo at one time was home of the national finals for drag racing.
His car was a 1964 Mailbu SS with 327 engine. many performance extras. It wasn’t nitrous oxide injected though. His best was usually 11.5 for the quarter mile.
I will give it to the Camry for a road course though. I’m sure it handled better.


#18

[QUOTE=alan1476;2710103]Better look out that Tesla doesn’t give you an expensive hot seat.:D[/QUOTE]

By ‘hot seat’ I believe Alan was referring to this:

//youtu.be/Pphr7WyNBWU


#19

[QUOTE=pinto2;2710128]I’ve Tesla-S, 85kWh [360hp] car, 0-60mph in sub 5.5 seconds.

Charging time with a 240V socket is abouth 9 to 10 hours.
While driving at 55 to 60mph I can get 230 to 260 miles with 15% reserve battery load, depending on teperature. In winthertime less.
At highway speed (70+mph) the safe limit is ~220 miles (sommertime).

Last winther I got low battery warning after 220 miles at 55mph with an outdoor temperature of -4F (-20C).[/QUOTE]

That is a really good mileage range. IMO, the real deal breaker for most people buying electric cars is the charge time. If they can ever get the charge time to 85% capacity in 10-15 minutes then most of us would be driving electrics.


#20

[QUOTE=Dee;2710083]I’ll be honest. I use the cheapest petrol I can find, which is usually at the local superstore, so regular for me.
Hubby’s car is a diesel, but I wouldn’t have a clue if he uses regular or premium.[/QUOTE]

Same here Dee. :iagree:

Don’t know if it’s the same in Scotland or not but Asda is usually the cheapest here.

[B]Wombler[/B]