Recommend a scanner

Could anyone recommend a scanner. The DVD discs and covers I have scanned with my Lexmark AIO are garbage. Looking at the Epson V200 but it is only $89 dollars and I am worried about its scan quality.

Welcome to the forum merchantivory.

I have always had great performance out of Canon flat beds.

Using an all-in-one now, Epson 680 and find it also to be a nice scanning devise.

The V200 is very much entry level, but it’s still a capable scanner.
If you want something a bit better you could consider the V350 (around $175) or the V500 (around $250)

Or as The Kipper said, Canon also make some very nice scanners.

I would expect the Canon software and drivers to be a tad better than Epson. Have several Canon scanners around here and they have all been very good.

I’d expect the optical hardware to be more alike than not in any of the available low/mid-range scanners, so it really boils down to driver and software implementation in the various offerings. In other words, how well do they let you make adjustments and get the best out of the scanner. Never expect perfect results from default out-of-the-box driver settings.

It’s also critical have have your monitor properly calibrated, and appropriate color profiles installed in Windows.

For disc and cover scanning, you are essentially working with printed material much like a magazine, about 150 DPI resolution. This presents some problems, moire being the most common. It certainly does not require a high-end scanner. Best results will be obtained by using a “de-screen” filter when scanning, scan at 300DPI, then open the image in Photoshop and re-sample to 150 DPI. This will eliminate most if not all moire. Perhaps you just need to do some fiddling to get better results from the Lexmark, although AIO scanners are not noted for high quality results.

Thanks CDan!

Used the De Screen Filter and resampled to 150 DPI. No more half toning or banding in the gradients. However, the image comes out a bit soft. I used an unsharp mask in Photoshop to sharpen it up. Is this what you would do? Also do you print in RGB or do you convert to CMYK before printing? I am using an Epson R280 for print outs.

[QUOTE=merchantivory;2052342]Thanks CDan!

Used the De Screen Filter and resampled to 150 DPI. No more half toning or banding in the gradients. However, the image comes out a bit soft. I used an unsharp mask in Photoshop to sharpen it up. Is this what you would do? Also do you print in RGB or do you convert to CMYK before printing? I am using an Epson R280 for print outs.[/QUOTE]

I use RGB with my Epson R280, and Gamma set to 2.2, which matches my monitor setup. I don’t use any filters in Photoshop, unless the moire is really bad, then the standard noise filter - BEFORE- re-sampling to 150. I use RGB all across the board and have very few issues with color matching. Turn off all the Epson printer photo enhancements and just use the manual setting with RGB and whichever gamma setting is appropriate for your monitor. Also slide the intensity slider up one notch in the Epson PrintCD software and be sure to select the premium disc surface setting.

Scanning at 300 then re-sampling to 150 sort of cancels out the moire. Google moire if you really want to know more about what causes it.