Real Networks boss accuses iPod owners of music theft

vbimport

#1

I just posted the article Real Networks boss accuses iPod owners of music theft.

RTV71 used our news submit to tell us about a comment from the upper echelon of the once mighty Real Networks organization. Apparently business is not slow enough, so he went public in…

Read the full article here:  [http://www.cdfreaks.com/news/11831-Real-Networks-boss-accuses-iPod-owners-of-music-theft.html](http://www.cdfreaks.com/news/11831-Real-Networks-boss-accuses-iPod-owners-of-music-theft.html)

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#2

As soon as RealNetworks makes their content compatable with iPods or other devices, then that guy can bitch all he wants. Right now, it’s whining over someone else making more money. Baby.


#3

I don’t like the guy but at least he’s telling the truth. I go to cal state fullerton and everyone owns an ipod and we load songs from each others computer. I never met someone who buy their songs from itunes music store. sad but true story. when apple say they make most of their music from ipod and not the music store, believe them.


#4

when apple they make most of their MONEY from ipod and not the music store, believe them.


#5

themushroom, RealNetworks did at one point open up the iPod to work with it’s network. This pissed Apple off and I’m not sure if it still works at this point. But the issue isn’t with Real for not making their software compatible with iPods… it’s with Apple who refuses to let any one else provide music for the iPod. They deliberately lock people out… it’s not that Real won’t try. Think about it, Real wants as many people as possible to buy their songs, why would they deliberately alienate 80% of the mp3 players out there? It’s Apple that’s trying to stop them. Second… as to the article. Am I the only one who buys a CD and puts it on my mp3 player? It would seem so… while I’m sure college kids with easy access to free music would be happy to steal, it’s one of the least offensive things most college kids are doing… there are alot of legitimate users out there who pay for their music. I’m more than happy to pay for a CD provided I can copy it to my iPod. Almost all of my music was purchased in a store (just not iTunes, I like CDs not low quality copy-protected rips)… and the tracks that I didn’t purchase were live songs that aren’t available. I must be in the minority but it’s offensive to hear that no one even suggests people like me exist.
[edited by jab1981 on 12.05.2006 13:31]


#6

In response to Real CEO Rob Glaser’s widely reported comments that most iPod users fill their devices with stolen music, we believe this might be more particular to Seattle than it is here in the UK. While we understand Real’s service is wholly incompatible with iPod’s (with the exception of the on / off relationship Harmony has with iPod’s) many iPod owners in the UK download MP3’s from Wippit where the company is reported to a third place position in the local market. In fact although Wippit’s growing catalogue is comprised of a majority 66% protected WMA files, 83% of music downloads sold through Wippit are unprotected and iPod compatible MP3s, a ratio of more than 4:1 in favour of MP3s. Our customers are not only downloading to iPods of course as MP3 files are also compatible with the vast majority of digital media players including mobile phones. Wippit CEO Paul Myers comments, “We may not be as well known in the US as we are here with only a well informed 12% of our customers coming from there, but if Rob wants a service to fill his iPod legally he could do a lot worse than trying our $90 a year unlimited, download to own subscription service.” See Wippit Subscription TV Review on Channel 5’s Gadget Show: http://wippit.com/presscoverage_gdshow.aspx


#7

Regardless of what you think of the guy and/or RealNetworks IT IS TRUE. Infact I’d suggest it’s more than 50%, and more like 85% plus. In the UK if you buy a CD this does NOT entitle you to copy it to your mp3 player; legally you are expected to re-buy it from iTunes. The same it you want a spare CD/tape copy for your car. I believe the RIAA are claiming the same for the US, despite US citizens previous commonly accepted ‘fair use’ rights. … and as mentioned in a prior news item, I don’t know how the music industry can get away with this stance whilst they simultaneously tax blank media like audio CD-Rs and cassettes to make up for supposed copying!!!