Reading .nrg file

I burned a dual-layer BD-R with Nero Linux 4 (UDF 1.02 format), then copied an image as a 50GB .nrg file. Is there a way to read this file and extract out the original files?

The reason I’m taking this approach is that the OS (SUSE 11) is not reading the disc properly - it sees the files as all around 1GB or 2GB even though they are much larger (I need to use UDF since the files are > 2GB that ISO supports). If there are any other tools I can use to read the disc directly, that would also be fine. I can read a single layer BD-R in UDF format without a problem - it’s just the dual-layer discs.

Thanks.
adam

Hi,

there is nrg2iso, which should be able to convert Nero nrg images to iso format (IIRC, there are only a couple of bytes to get rid of or something like that). I am not a Linux user, but mounting an iso image shouldn’t be that difficult, so you can retrieve the data then.

Michael

Michael,

Thanks for the reply. However, the ISO format has an inherent limit of each file being no larger than 2GB which is why I needed to use the UDF format when I burnt the disc. So, it would seem that I couldn’t use ngr2iso because it couldn’t create a valid ISO file from this data (my files are on the order of 10GB).

Hi,

an ISO image of a disc is something else than ISO-9660 “data” format.
So, I’d just try and see if it works.

Michael

Michael,

OK thanks - my mistake. I should mention that it appears that Nero has some sort of 16GB .nrg limit or something - when I created an image of the 50GB blu ray, it created TempImage.nrg, TempImage.nrg.001, and TempImage.nrg.002, all of which were around 16GB. If I go to copy that image directly through Nero’s software, it finds all three files and makes it appear to be a single 48GB file.

Looking at the nrg2iso source, I see it’s simply skipping the first N bytes of the file. I also saw a suggestion to use the mount command directly on the .nrg file with an appropiate offset. Neither of these worked, presumably because each individual .nrg file is not itself a valid file. Do you happen to know if I were to create a single file which was all but the first 307,200 bytes of the first file followed by all of the second and third files if this would be a valid ISO file?

Thanks.
adam

What about simply merging these partial files into a single big file?
I am not a Linux user, so I don’t know which command is needed.

Michael

You might try mounting the image with acetoneISO application, which creates virtual drives and mounts a multitude of images to look at all of the files. You can get it from either the KDE Repository or the Packman Repository. I have been using it for a while and it has a GUI. Works great!