Reading .nrg file

vbimport

#1

I burned a dual-layer BD-R with Nero Linux 4 (UDF 1.02 format), then copied an image as a 50GB .nrg file. Is there a way to read this file and extract out the original files?

The reason I’m taking this approach is that the OS (SUSE 11) is not reading the disc properly - it sees the files as all around 1GB or 2GB even though they are much larger (I need to use UDF since the files are > 2GB that ISO supports). If there are any other tools I can use to read the disc directly, that would also be fine. I can read a single layer BD-R in UDF format without a problem - it’s just the dual-layer discs.

Thanks.
adam


#2

Hi,

there is nrg2iso, which should be able to convert Nero nrg images to iso format (IIRC, there are only a couple of bytes to get rid of or something like that). I am not a Linux user, but mounting an iso image shouldn’t be that difficult, so you can retrieve the data then.

Michael


#3

Michael,

Thanks for the reply. However, the ISO format has an inherent limit of each file being no larger than 2GB which is why I needed to use the UDF format when I burnt the disc. So, it would seem that I couldn’t use ngr2iso because it couldn’t create a valid ISO file from this data (my files are on the order of 10GB).


#4

Hi,

an ISO image of a disc is something else than ISO-9660 “data” format.
So, I’d just try and see if it works.

Michael


#5

Michael,

OK thanks - my mistake. I should mention that it appears that Nero has some sort of 16GB .nrg limit or something - when I created an image of the 50GB blu ray, it created TempImage.nrg, TempImage.nrg.001, and TempImage.nrg.002, all of which were around 16GB. If I go to copy that image directly through Nero’s software, it finds all three files and makes it appear to be a single 48GB file.

Looking at the nrg2iso source, I see it’s simply skipping the first N bytes of the file. I also saw a suggestion to use the mount command directly on the .nrg file with an appropiate offset. Neither of these worked, presumably because each individual .nrg file is not itself a valid file. Do you happen to know if I were to create a single file which was all but the first 307,200 bytes of the first file followed by all of the second and third files if this would be a valid ISO file?

Thanks.
adam


#6

What about simply merging these partial files into a single big file?
I am not a Linux user, so I don’t know which command is needed.

Michael


#7

You might try mounting the image with acetoneISO application, which creates virtual drives and mounts a multitude of images to look at all of the files. You can get it from either the KDE Repository or the Packman Repository. I have been using it for a while and it has a GUI. Works great!