Radio

vbimport

#1

That’s right Radio,I know some of you were to young to remember the old radio stations before TV’s were popular,but to some of us we can remember when radio was the only entertainment. Here’s a site that will bring back old memory’s.
http://www.dumb.com/oldtimeradio/

this to the one’s that can remember ,hey


#2

Looks interesting .I actually never listened to any of the old radio shows way back when I was a kid. I would probably have been on the very end of that era.
My parents got a TV when I was 6 years old & the only thing I remember them listening to before or after that on a radio was music ,news, & sometimes sports.

I have listened to a few after I was older . Quite a few years ago a local radio station played the “War of Worlds” broadcast that caused so much trouble when it was originally broadcast . With the internet I’ve checked out a couple of others .
When I have time I’m going to check out some of the ones from the link you posted.


#3

Radio that’s something used before man learned how to use tools I think.


#4

The original wireless network! Distance is awesome compared to coffeeshop wifi, and users don’t syphon off bandwidth.

Thanks for this site.

One of my favorite streaming sites is OTRNow, which has two streams running daily, each for 12 hours then it’s repeated so 7am shows are re-streamed at 7pm.

And Archive.ORG has a vast and free selection for downloading shows, which gets useful once I learned my favorite shows via streaming and samples.

DUFFY’S TAVERN is a favorite comedy, more akin to TV’s Cheers, only 5 decades earlier.

I’m not a fan of Alan Ladd, but his BOX 13 is an excellent mystery - detective show about Ladd being a burned-out reporter, certain there are plenty of great stories for his freelance writing career. All people have to do is drop him a note at Box 13 and he’ll work on it.

YOUR’S TRULY JOHNNY DOLLAR didn’t sound promising but it’s another favorite, about an insurance investigator (originally actor Edmund O’Brien) who is reciting his last ‘report’ on paper, which takes us thru the show, then he signs this expense-laden report, …yours truly…

There are 5 decades of JACK BENNY shows, but if you can find the ones with Ronald Colman, those are hilarious. Ronald and Jack are real-life neighbors, and in the show, they use this to exploit Jack’s infamous money-grubbing ‘let me borrow instead of buy my own’ nature. Like Colman’s Oscar, for example. And his newest electric razor.

The radio show GUNSMOKE ran alongside the TV show for several years, using William Cannon as Marshall Dillon and Floyd The Barber (Howard McNear) as Doc.

Frank Sinatra’s ROCKY FORTUNE has our erstwhile hero playing a wandering day-worker who gets into and out of trouble, 30 minutes a week.

And after a year’s success with the film version THE THIRD MAN, Orson Welles responded with a 50-episode prequel called THE ADVENTURES OF HARRY LIME, THE THIRD MAN, using Anton Karas’ distinctive zither theme and Orson playing Harry Lime. Harry’s still a scoundrel, but he’s not the worst bad guy on each show. Sometimes he loses the loot, sometimes he slips away with it.


#5

OTR NOW is a great site ,Thanks Christine my dad was a Red Skelton fan and I remember his tv programs well ,I’d forgot Red was on radio first.
And I forgot about all the smoking adds,my dad die at 80 from cancer,he smoked camels right up to the day before he died,we buried him with a pack of smokes and a lighter.John Wayne and Eddie Murphy were his hero’s


#6

It’s funny to hear those ads. Even funnier to listen to Amos telling Andy not to waste his money on “those coffin nails”. That was from a 1930 show. Anyone care to argue that “coffin nails” is a highly complimentary phrase for a consumable?

“Only for the tobacco and health industry!”

In 1938, Fibber McGee’s advertising a “smoother, healthier filter” on his sponsor’s cigarettes. So even then, “Health” was an issue. We gotta make them healthier!! The Filter will save people!! Yeah. Right.

Louise Brooks’ 1929 PANDORA’S BOX has scenes of people coughing and complaining about ciggies, too.

But all thru the old-time radio shows, the ciggie ads keep bringing up “healthier” and “better for you!” phrases. Four decades later, the lies were presented before Parliament and the US Congress. “Coffin nails” didn’t originate in a radio-studio’s dialog in 1930 - I doubt any long-time smoker would claim they felt healthier, ever.

Speaking of heavy smokers, Jack Webb’s radio DRAGNET is a fun radio series instead of that turgid dollop on the TV screen. It’s still a police-procedural drama, but there are running gags between Sgt Friday and whoever-his-partner-is for that season.

And if you can find the Jack Benny vs Fred Allen pairings on their radio shows (as described in ArchiveOrg’s Show Titles), those are always terrific shows where Jack and Fred complain against the other one, trump up charges and hurl accusations, always ensuring the other fellow’s show would get even higher ratings.

Fred needed those. Jack didn’t. And Fred’s was indeed the short-lived series.

I am surprised to see so many radio-shows existed in parallel to TV series. Gunsmoke with it’s different cast, and Jack Benny with identical casts and even tangential storylines.

Then there are shows like Amos & Andy which moved to TV and quickly adopted Sapphire (Kingfisher’s wife) as a main character, quite different from the radio series’ use of that character.