R.I.P. Aaron Swartz

vbimport

#1

Aaron Swartz committed suicide yesterday. IMO, we all owe him our gratitude for his efforts to stop the SOPA/PIPA legislation that was well on its way to becoming law before he became a strong proponent for Internet freedom. Here is a video clip of him giving a speech on what SOPA/PIPA represented and how it was defeated through a grass roots Internet based movement. It is 22 minutes long but well worth listening to because we need people like Aaron as they are the only ones standing between an open Internet and one that is severely restricted by governments and corporate interests.
Aaron Swartz keynote - “How we stopped SOPA”


#2

Wow, something must have happened with his life to do something like this. I would say he’s a geek hero and should be remembered for what he did for us and lets hope we all have learned to step up next time the big boys forget who they work for and try to pull something like SOPA again.


#3

I smell a conspiracy…


#4

That’s a great video this Aaron Swartz was a smart dude and right in every way, the courts ,the bill passing machine in Washington need to be watched to make sure they don’t try to pull off the crime of the century .If there’s money ,and I mean big money in it they will try again and somebody needs to be on their toes to fight ,to beat them at their game.


#5

[B]In 2011, Aaron used the MIT campus network to download millions of journal articles from the JSTOR database, allegedly changing his laptop’s IP and MAC addresses when necessary to get around blocks put in place by JSTOR and MIT and sneaking into a closet to get a faster connection to the MIT network. For this purported crime, Aaron was facing criminal charges with penalties up to thirty-five years in prison, most seriously for “unauthorized access” to computers under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act.[/B]

[B]Link:[/B] https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2013/01/farewell-aaron-swartz

:cool::cool:


#6

Well that sucks and probably explains his reasoning for giving up, plus his introversion probably was a big issue too. But he could make things happen and could tell a story in front of many when needed so at least he got a chance to do some good and change things before he called it quits:(


#7

Here is the text of the JSTOR release:
We are deeply saddened to hear the news about Aaron Swartz. We extend our heartfelt condolences to Aaron’s family, friends, and everyone who loved, knew, and admired him. He was a truly gifted person who made important contributions to the development of the internet and the web from which we all benefit…


#8

It’s all the same thing the rich hoard the Knowledge that the poor can’t afford to access and keep the poor and middle class dumb and stupid.The knowledge to save lives and pain and suffering,they don’t want the low life’s to prosper and be so happy not to need them to rule us.
They want us to fear them.


#9

Swartz was being harshly prosecuted over the JSTORE situation. In fact, JSTORE ultimately sided with Swartz on the matter. Swartz thought this information should be freely availably instead of being available only to those able to pay the annual $50,000 subscription fee. The Massachusetts US Attorney’s office and MIT was accusing him of trying to profit from the download of the documents when I highly doubt this is true. He did not need any more money and probably wanted to make this info available to the masses for free. My guess is the US government saw this as a way to punish him for having such a prominant roll in killing the SOPA/PIPA legislation.

Read more on this here: http://usnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/01/12/16485181-family-of-aaron-swartz-government-officials-partly-to-blame-for-his-death?lite


#10

Well I hope that somebody does what he did about SOPA to the idiots in government and elsewhere that tried to make him out to be some sort of online terrorist that needed to be charged a bunch of money and locked away for 50 years, more then likely because they hadn’t forgot what he did to SOPA.
Other people who do bad things get a slap on the wrist or nothing depending on how important they are but the little guys always get to be the example to try and keep the rest of us inline.


#11

So you want to help? You can!

http://aaronsw.archiveteam.org/


#12

news flash - http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/01/15/darrell-issa-aaron-swartz-_n_2481450.html


#13

[QUOTE=marloyd;2673298]news flash - http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/01/15/darrell-issa-aaron-swartz-_n_2481450.html[/QUOTE]

I hope they probe the sh… out this


#14

Just bringing this text to the table as well. Personally i hope it is a major coincedence and until investigation is completely over i will have no opinion about it. Too much is already lost when people get fanatic or emotional.

http://rt.com/usa/news/swartz-prosecutor-suicide-hacker-050/

One of the prosecutors investigating Reddit co-founder Aaron Swartz, who committed suicide this weekend, has also been accused of driving another hacker to kill himself.

In 2008 Jonathan James killed himself after being implicated in the largest personal identity hack in history. The case was spearheaded by Massachusetts Assistant US Attorney Stephen Heymann, who was also integral to the investigation against Swartz, Buzzfeed reports.

Heymann reportedly pursued James with zeal, he was the first minor to be taken into custody for a federal cybercrime case.

In the criminal complaints filed with the US District Court in Massachusetts, James was believed to have been identified as “JJ.”

Two weeks after the Secret Service raided his house in conjunction with the investigation led by Heymann into the theft of tens of thousands of credit card numbers, James was found dead.

In his suicide note, James wrote the decision to take his own life was a direct response to the federal investigation implicating him in a crime he says he did not commit.

“I have no faith in the ‘justice’ system. Perhaps my actions today, and this letter, will send a stronger message to the public. Either way, I have lost control over this situation and this is my only way to regain control,” Buzzfeed cites the note as saying.

“Remember,” he continued, “it’s not whether you win or lose, it’s whether I win or lose, and sitting in jail for 20, 10, or even 5 years for a crime I didn’t commit is not me winning. I die free.”

In 2010 Heymann received the Attorney General’s Award for Distinguished Service for his role in “directing the largest and most successful identity theft and hacking investigation ever conducted in the United States.”

The case against Swartz however, was vastly different, as the Internet freedom activist was being investigated for his involvement in the theft of content hosted on JSTOR, a digital archive used by universities and other research institutions. Swartz, who was living in New York City at the time of his death, had accessed JSTOR through the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s library, which led to his 2011 indictment in Boston.

Though JSTOR decided not to press charges – and even urged the US government to drop the case – MIT went ahead with a civil suit. Other critics lambasted the US attorney in Boston for the office’s desire to press ahead with charges which would have Swartz behind bars for longer than some convicted of homicide. Those close to Swartz believe that the possibility of a lengthy prison sentence is what led to his suicide on January 11.

His defense team suspected federal attorneys were using Swartz as an example to show how serious they take online crime, the Huffington Post reports.

Swartz’s attorney Elliot Peters accused Heymann of aggressively pursuing Swartz because the case “"was going to receive press and he was going to be a tough guy and read his name in the newspaper."

Andrew Good, a Boston attorney who had previously represented Swartz in the case, said he told federal prosecutors that Swartz was a suicide risk.

“Their response was, put him in jail, he’ll be safe there,” Good said.


#15

It looks like the issues surrounding Swartz’s death is not going quietly into the night. Anonymous has hacked into a government website and released documents they found regarding sentencing. It seems Swartz not the only person this prosecutor has hounded into committing suicide. He did the same thing to a minor as is posted above. The link is below.
http://www.zdnet.com/anonymous-hacks-us-sentencing-commission-distributes-files-7000010369/


#16

And here this nation is talking about passing bullying legislation laws? Well this would be one for the books that qualifies as bullying for bullying sacks and the prosecutor shouldn’t loose all prosecution immunity from being prosecuted by the very law they proclaim to uphold.


#17

I won’t forget him and make his ideal lives.


#18

latest-


#19

“We often negotiate without coercive tactics” claims one prosecutor. Yeah. Right. “Believing an attorney” falls into the same high standards as “believing politicians” and “falling into a pig-farm’s latrine”.

I have no advocacy or good considerations toward suicides.

In legalese, though, final statements of the Dead are given Most High Sanctions. I wonder how those same attorneys feel about THAT precedence!


#20

This story is just another indication of an ever growing tyrannical government here in the USA.