Quick erase or full erase?

vbimport

#1

sorry for the noob question, but i burn movies to dvd+rw, watch em, then erase them. what is the advantage of a full erase vs. a quick erase? will one option increase/decrease the longevity of the dvd+rw?

also, as i record and re-record (write, erase, write,etc), will plextools show the ‘wear’ on the disk in one of those tests it performs?

tia, loserbarrell


#2

I have always used Quick Erase, and Full Erase if QE did not work.

I have about 20 dvd-rw/+rw discs, so it owuld take quite a long time to wear them out.


#3
  1. Quick erase just changes a small part of the disc to indicate that the disc is empty and ready for writing, but most the disc remains unchanged. This means that old data is not actually gone until it is overwritten by something else.

  2. Full erase actually goes through the whole disc and changes all areas back to the ‘unwritten’ state. Unsurprisingly, this method is slower that QE.

  3. Unless you are worried about privacy (i.e. somebody accessing the contents of an ‘erased’ disc) then there’s no reason to use FE unless you are having problems with the disc and need a truly ‘clean slate’ .

  4. In theory, FE will make the disc degrade more quickly than QE because, in FE, you are changing bits back to their normal state during erase, and then changing them again on the reburn. This is merely speculation though, as I have not seen actual tests or studies that support this theory.

  5. If you are using QCheck all the time on your discs, you will probably see increasing error levels as they get older. But honestly this takes a lot of time and is probably not worth it for Rw discs in general, as they are not for long term storage to begin with. Most likely the first sign of disc degradation will be problems playing it back on your player.

  6. Even though Rw discs are rated for ‘ten thousand writes’ and such, this does not mean that it will operate perfectly on the 9,999th write! Most likely as they get older you will have to start using slower burn speeds if you want them to be reliable.


#4

I ll tell you what’s the advantage of full erase over quick erase.

It makes rich recordable media companies richer.

I don’t know (or care) how full erase should work in ideal conditions.

[B]In real life conditions, even with new and not so many times used drives, with branded disks like Philips and sony, the result of full erase is always to ruin your disc.
[/B]
For example, I had a Nec 2510A (new at the time I did the following). I put in a Sony CD-RW and full erased it. It died from the first recording. Then, I put in another Sony CD-RW, same brand, same lot, cos I had bought them the same day, same time, from the same store (I bought 3, to be pricise, all of them the same). These last two, since I always quick erase them, they still serve me till nowadays. It was a matter of erase mode.

Now, I just ruined in my laptops drive a Philips DVD+RW, just because DVD decrypter started full erasing without asking. Once I try tomorrow with the same disk with a quick erase, I know I won’t be surpised by the result. And I know I ll keep the disc I ll buy tommorow for another 5 years

So, never full erase, always quick erase.


#5

Do you realise that this thread is 3.5 years old? :o


#6

[QUOTE=Jucius_Maximus;2102334]Do you realise that this thread is 3.5 years old? :o[/QUOTE]
Yes, but it appeared first on google when I searched for “full erase”. I don’t understand why threads like these should have an expiration date.


#7

It doesn’t have an expiration date. :slight_smile:

Personally, I have quite an opposite experience and opinion about full vs. quick.

I found that my DVDRW media lasts longer if a full erase is performed from time to time, as opposed to quick erase only.
Others have a similar experience as mine.

You can’t draw conclusions from a single given brand/model of disc, in a single burner model, and go claiming “never full erase” from this single, anecdotic experience! :wink:

It makes rich recordable media companies richer.
Naaaah. To make more money from a limited lifetime of their products, companies always lure customers into easier, faster methods (18X/20X burning srpings to my mind… :bigsmile: ), never into longer, trickier ones. :disagree:


#8

Disclaimer: Note the following is only either my opinion or my experience

I usually prefer a quick erase. For the 2 RW media I use [both types are Sony disc models], regardless of drive, I not yet gotten a better write quality either way [although I’ve only done a few writes to the discs], and I don’t store any sensitive data on the RW.

I know that the LiteOn drives I usually use for my DVD+RW writing are usually very easy on RW in any case, and the Samsung and LG drives I’ve used to write the CD-RW haven’t made the discs work any better or worse than B-grade CD-R, so I’m not worried.

Note that some media is just easily upset, or that some drives could be unsuitable to do full erases and then rewrite because of improper write strategies.[QUOTE=kurkosdr;2102329]
Now, I just ruined in my laptops drive a Philips DVD+RW, just because DVD decrypter started full erasing without asking.[/QUOTE]

If you have this issue, be sure to disable “Prefer Properly Formatted RW” in Settings > Write [this option exists in ImgBurn, and forces an initial full format. Afterwards, the user may use either quick erase or full erase. This option may be forced on in DVD Decrypter]. If you plan to just use new RW media, you can leave the option on and be sure to do the first write to the media in DVDD/ImgBurn.


#9

Hi [B]kurkosdr[/B], welcome to CDFreaks! :slight_smile:

[quote=kurkosdr;2102329][B]In real life conditions, even with new and not so many times used drives, with branded disks like Philips and sony, the result of full erase is always to ruin your disc.[/B][/quote] That simply isn’t true. :disagree:

Any personal experience you may have does NOT translate into this being the ONLY thing that could ever happen for anyone else regardless of equipment and media used!

[quote=Francksoy;2102373]Personally, I have quite an opposite experience and opinion about full vs. quick.

I found that my DVDRW media lasts longer if a full erase is performed from time to time, as opposed to quick erase only.
Others have a similar experience as mine.[/quote] I have the same experience. :iagree:

In other words: Using Full Erase [I]every[/I] time is not necessary (and may wear out your media faster), but using Full Erase [I]occasionally[/I] may help in keeping your RW media usable or restoring it to a usable state.

I’ve had to use Full Erase a number of times in order to make RW media usable again. Now I use it after a few cycles of write/quick-erase as a matter of habit so that I don’t have to wait for the RW media to fail before restoring it.


#10

Anecdotal evidence: I’ve encountered more rewritable DVDs that started doing trouble (and not after too many rewrites) than rewritable CDs. Does anyone else get the impression CD-RW is more reliable (in the sense that it can be written multiple times)?


#11

[quote=shae;2102649]Anecdotal evidence: I’ve encountered more rewritable DVDs that started doing trouble (and not after too many rewrites) than rewritable CDs. Does anyone else get the impression CD-RW is more reliable (in the sense that it can be written multiple times)?[/quote] It’s so long since I’ve actually used any of my rewriteable CDs that I can’t really comment - these days I just burn a CD-R and throw it away when I don’t need it anymore.


#12

Perhaps I’m weird, but I like to do a full erase. :slight_smile:

@Drage - you have that much surplus media, eh? :bigsmile:


#13

[QUOTE=shae;2102649]Does anyone else get the impression CD-RW is more reliable (in the sense that it can be written multiple times)?[/QUOTE]When comparing CDRW and DVDRW both of similar manufaturing quality, ooooh, yes! :iagree:

Even my premium Verbatim DVDRWs generally fail after (roug estimation) 35-40 write/erase cycles… :frowning:
(Not all of them, though. There’s a couple I bought in 2005 that I think have been through at least 100 cycles.)

I remember having used three Verbatim CDRWs extensively for more than 5 years!

But both can be ruined much faster than that, just from rough handling. Specially the DVDRWs of course.