Quick divx -> dvd question

I have a pal xvid, and I am converting it to ntsc

in the tutorial, it says to:

"
4. Edit the script to include
bicubicresize(720,480) <-- change the 576 to 480
Assumefps(23.976) <-- Include this line here
"

but when the script pops up, mine looks like this:

LanczosResize(720,326)
AddBorders(0,125,0,125)

What should I change it to?

Well I have done a few of these. When I hit the problem you describe I solved it in this manner. If you add up the 125, 125 and 326 (vertical heights) you get the 576. 480 is 83.3333% of 576. So I multiply the 125 and the 326 by 83.3333% and I arrive at the following:

LanczosResize(720,272)
AddBorders(0,104,0,104)
Assumefps(23.976)

Is there a reason you did not choose the bicubic resize method?

Hope that helps. Others: Feel free to correct me if I am off my rocker.

first, a couple more questions.

So I am making this DVD to play on a regular 4:3 tv screen. When encoding a xvid to DVD, must I make sure that the height and width have a 4:3 ratio?

example:

Gspot says the xvid I am converting has a 640x272 (1:2.35) ratio and is PAL.

Since DVDs have a width of 720, I must:

(720 / 640) = (x / 272 )
x = 306

so that means the video must be 720x306

now this is where I get a little confused. I can encode the DVD with 720x306 as the resolution, that then not add any black bars on the top. So when this DVD is played on a 4:3 tv, it will add black bars to the top and bottom, and when it is played on a wide screen TV, it will resize appropiatly?
am I correct saying that?

OR

must I encode the DVD to play on only 4:3 tvs. Since I want 720x480 for a NTSC tv, I would add 87pxl of black to the top and bottom of my 306 vertical pixl movie?

does any of this make sense?

what should the aviscript look like?

I tried encoding the video again.

when the edit script window popped up, I entered

bicubicresize(720,306)
Assumefps(23.976)
AddBorders(0,87,0,87)

as D2SRoBa did a few sample Q encodings, I closed DVD2SVCD and CCE. Then I played “D2SRoBa_Q8.mpv” in VLC and played the origional XVID in another VLC window. The D2SRoBa_Q8.mpv had a larger vertical resolution. Just buy a little bit, but I could notice it. I am completly stumpped now…

please help :slight_smile:

Here is how I handle the 1:2.35 acpect ratio when I do this operation. When selecting the aspect ration in the conversion menu, I select 16:9 borders added encode as 4:3. That seems to work, but I have never compared the input and output.

Alos, I did more reading and you should use the LanczosResize in an avi to dvd operation. I got confused because I was still using an older dvd2svcd.

I also select 16:9 borders added.

I belive the problem is that it is a PAL file, and I would like it to be ntsc.

Even when I select 16:9 borders added, I still have to edit the avi script when it pops up. and I am still confused as to what numbers to enter…

OK… I have done some more research. What I suggested in my first reply (borders of 104, video of 272) will work correctly IF you want to encode the video to a 4:3 ratio.

There is another thread on the forum discussing 2.35:1 conversion:
http://club.cdfreaks.com/showthread.php?t=108976&highlight=resize

If you are using the latest D2S, ChickenMan states that you can select the “anamorphic” in the “conversion” menu. When the script pops up, you should see:

LanczosResize(720,436)
AddBorders(0,70,0,70)

Using my .833333 conversion factor from above I would change this to:

LanczosResize(720,364)
AddBorders(0,58,0,58)
Assumefps(23.976)

However, the AVI Resizer Calculator that CM mentions in the other thread says:

LanczosResize(720,362)
AddBorders(0,59,0,59)
Assumefps(23.976)

I doubt you would be able to see the difference when it is on the tv. I would try one of the resolutions mentioned here and see how it goes.

genericuser, I’d go with your figures as the AVIRES utility does not round it to be divisable by 4 and a few pixels or less witll absolutely never be seen by anyone. Your TV built in AR is never 100% accurate anyway.

If its 16:9 or wider, then ALWAYS select the “Anamorphic (encode as 16:9)” option for best playback compatability with both 4:3 and 16:9 TV’s.