Questions about ripping audio CDs

vbimport

#1

I think I’m going to start trying to rip all my music CDs at some point soon, and I have some questions.

I’ve seen people talk about doing accurate or secure CD rips with EAC, and that each CD can take longer than an hour to rip. But then I have Nero 5 on my computer, and it has a CD Copy function that only takes 5-10 minutes to copy a CD. It also has a Save Track function, and saving all the tracks off a CD to WAV files doesn’t take longer than 10 minutes. Would using Nero to copy or rip a CD result in quality loss? I just wonder why ripping with EAC would take so much longer than with Nero.

Seems like everyone recommends using a special program like EAC or maybe dbPowerAmp to rip CDs, and that trying to rip any other way might result in quality loss. But I don’t really understand that. With data CDs, you don’t need any special programs to copy them (assuming they don’t have any copy protection). It’s just digital data. And audio CDs are digital data too, so I don’t understand why they are different from data CDs - why do you need special programs to copy/rip them?


#2

[QUOTE=sl_dvd;2537928]I think I’m going to start trying to rip all my music CDs at some point soon, and I have some questions.

I’ve seen people talk about doing accurate or secure CD rips with EAC, and that each CD can take longer than an hour to rip. But then I have Nero 5 on my computer, and it has a CD Copy function that only takes 5-10 minutes to copy a CD. It also has a Save Track function, and saving all the tracks off a CD to WAV files doesn’t take longer than 10 minutes. Would using Nero to copy or rip a CD result in quality loss? I just wonder why ripping with EAC would take so much longer than with Nero.

Seems like everyone recommends using a special program like EAC or maybe dbPowerAmp to rip CDs, and that trying to rip any other way might result in quality loss. But I don’t really understand that. With data CDs, you don’t need any special programs to copy them (assuming they don’t have any copy protection). It’s just digital data. And audio CDs are digital data too, so I don’t understand why they are different from data CDs - why do you need special programs to copy/rip them?[/QUOTE]

a SCRATCHED disc taking an hour or more to rip in “secure mode” is common, but an unscratched disc typically takes 3-5 minutes

some badly scratched discs are simply impossible to rip in secure mode.

Basically if a disc won’t rip in 3-5 minutes and you can replace it, you probably should replace it.

EAC can take longer because it’s about “Accurate” results, not FAST results, but you can set it for seed if you prefer (it’ll still tell you about eerrors)

Audio CD’s are truely data CD’s, but because of what the record company executives asked for wasn’t technically possible (a digital version of an LP) the Engineers actually created something that wile actually a data media it emulated the analog media it replaced.

It is the method of emulation that creates some minor issues.

One of those is that the engineers “overachieved” in what information to actually save as data, because upwards of 25% of the data in a CDDA files is data that no human ear can has or will ever hear…

and the space used to record that data was simply wasted, by the original design even with the original technology employed.

Now if you set EAC to “paranoid” mode you are on your own…
I’ve never even tried it.

Some people get WAY too wrapped up in the idea of precision
(And in the process lose any rational hope of actually understanding)

but it boils down to this, if you cannot personally hear the difference from your “original source” and your “copy” it’s “good enough”

“Perfection” has always been the enemy of “good enough”

I use EAC because I can “no brain” most of the process, I do my “ripping” in batches of 10-15CD’s at a time, the WAVs are all saved to a seperate drive on my computer on that drive I also create and tag my mp3’s before I move the files elsewhere (the WAVS to an Archive, the mp3’s to my “playback” drive and any backups I make…

the reason I do it the way I do is that I can stick a disc in the drive press the “extract as wav” button and watch TV while it does it’s thing.

Or play a game on my other desktop…

when the extraction finishes I feed it another disc.

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#3

I just wonder why ripping with EAC would take so much longer than with Nero.

In a nutshell, error detection…
http://www.exactaudiocopy.de/en/index.php/overview/basic-technology/extraction-technology/
If you want speed, use Burst mode w/AccurateRip

why do you need special programs to copy/rip them?

You don’t…if you can get any [I]ordinary[/I](Cdex, iTunes) ripper to rip your CD, and the results are to your satisfaction, what’s the prob?..If you can’t get any ripper to successfully rip a badly scratched disc, then as AD stated, replace it…There’s always a digital download…Contrary to what some may tell you, iTunes, Amazon, offer good quality downloads these days…:wink:
Most of the time, I use EAC in Burst mode…I am however more fond of dBpoweramp’s user-friendliness, and of course it’s always updated…

I believe foobar2k(my default player) now offers some kind of secure ripping…Not sure since I’ve not tested it yet…And many(not all) iPod owners rip with iTunes, since most will be syncing their pods with the preferred AAC/m4a format…And no, you don’t need iTunes to sync the pod…:slight_smile:


#4

Yo-

Nero 5 - wow that’s some really dated program (2003 maybe) - anyway - using Nero and any other program - the key to good quality is media - speed and program.

Strongly suggest using Taiyo Yuden CD-R’s and burning at 16x max for the best results.

EAC is an excellent program - good updating and is free-eh!!!


#5

Thanks for the replies.

So EAC might be slower because it does a lot of error detection. So this raises another question for me: if there are programs that can do accurate ripping for audio CDs, why aren’t there any programs that can do accurate ripping for DVDs? Or data CDs? If I want to copy a DVD or some data from a CD-R, I want to make sure it gets accurately copied too.


#6

[QUOTE=sl_dvd;2538173]Thanks for the replies.

So EAC might be slower because it does a lot of error detection. So this raises another question for me: if there are programs that can do accurate ripping for audio CDs, why aren’t there any programs that can do accurate ripping for DVDs? Or data CDs? If I want to copy a DVD or some data from a CD-R, I want to make sure it gets accurately copied too.[/QUOTE]

Data disks are completely different and have different provisions for data integrity since the data has to be read [U]perfectly[/U] every time.

When you copy a file from a data disk it’s identical to the original.

CD Audio is an analogue format that just happens to be stored on a digital medium and because it’s an analogue format the error correction mechanism is an integral part of the reading process.

[B]Wombler[/B]