Question and Plea for Help

I am running the free version in an attempt to determine if DVDNCiT will allow me to get Audible files into an MP3 format.

AMAZING - A five year problem has been solved. DVDNCiT will do it. I have tested a few Audible files with the “Free” program. (I can give you a boring 8 year history on attempted solutions to converting Audible files, but I think it is best to state my conclusions about DVDNCiT and will elaborate on history ONLY if you have questions). Problems are as follows:

DVDNCiT does not truncate any file. It works harmoniously with iTunes. :clap: Takes a while but nice job.

FILE FOLDER NAMES look something like Disc 1, Disc 2, … Disc 14, Disc 15. Now this may not seem to be a problem at first but I need them to play in a particular order. Leeding 0’s would be a nice solution/change.

INDIVIDUAL FILE NAMES look something like title, title 1, …title 14, title 15. Now again I need them to play in order. Leeding 0’s would be a nice solution/change.

ID3 Tags are empty and need editing. (Like I said I am using the free version). So, along this line … QUESTION - Will DVDNCiT PRO bring in not only the ID3 tags, but also the artwork and include the “AUDIOBOOK” status?

FILE QUALITY. There is some form of a conversion going on. The original Audible MP3 file was 72 MB (this represents around 5-6 discs) and the total for the resulting files for the book conversion is running way above that figure. Each virtual disc is running around 123 MB, for a total of around 800 MB, vs. the original 72 MB file. The original bit rate is no where near the bit rate claimed in the conversion (192 kbs and 44 kHz). You cannot take a digital file that is around 64 kbs and make it a 192 kbs file. It just isn’t possible or realistic. This may be the reason why the files are larger in size than the original 72 MB. DVDNCiT is converting a 64 kbs file into a 192 kbs file without any quality increase. In fact, this conversion is probably degrading the file quality.

OMINOUS ERROR MESSAGE UPON INSTALLATION
I got such a nasty error message upon installation. It stated that the free program had changed registry values that would probably halt operation of not only XP Media Player but also the functionality of the XP operating system. What gives?

Albert has called it a night so give him time if anyone he would give you the best help on this app.

[QUOTE=Ultra57;2134443]DVDNCiT does not truncate any file. It works harmoniously with iTunes. :clap: Takes a while but nice job.[/QUOTE]Yep. It does take a while.

It works as fast as your computer can go. It’s in the nature of how the program accomplishes its task–re encoding data from raw WAV/CD Audio data to a compressed format [after the host software decodes the original song file]–that takes so long.

Unfortunately, I have not noticed the program making use of multiple cores or HyperThreading at all, as very few programs/codecs that encode can.

FILE FOLDER NAMES look something like Disc 1, Disc 2, … Disc 14, Disc 15. Now this may not seem to be a problem at first but I need them to play in a particular order. Leeding 0’s would be a nice solution/change.
Probably so…but as far as I know, you can rename them as you go, or manually go through Windows Explorer and rename the folders.

ID3 Tags are empty and need editing. (Like I said I am using the free version). So, along this line … QUESTION - Will DVDNCiT PRO bring in not only the ID3 tags, but also the artwork and include the “AUDIOBOOK” status?
iTurns copies tagging/naming data from the CD Text data sent by a given program. Only some programs send CD Text, and it may have to be enabled. What is the initial playback software [Windows Media Player, iTunes, etc], and do the files have actual tags that the software can manipulate/read?

INDIVIDUAL FILE NAMES look something like title, title 1, …title 14, title 15. Now again I need them to play in order. Leeding 0’s would be a nice solution/change.
The leading zeroes don’t exist, but the files should be named based on a scheme you set up in the options. Again, though, this requires that the initial player [Windows Media Player, iTunes, etc] attempts to burn CD Text, and that the data for the CD Text is present.
FILE QUALITY. There is some form of a conversion going on. The original Audible MP3 file was 72 MB (this represents around 5-6 discs) and the total for the resulting files for the book conversion is running way above that figure. Each virtual disc is running around 123 MB, for a total of around 800 MB, vs. the original 72 MB file. The original bit rate is no where near the bit rate claimed in the conversion (192 kbs and 44 kHz). You cannot take a digital file that is around 64 kbs and make it a 192 kbs file. It just isn’t possible or realistic. This may be the reason why the files are larger in size than the original 72 MB. DVDNCiT is converting a 64 kbs file into a 192 kbs file without any quality increase. In fact, this conversion is probably degrading the file quality.
Again, this is the nature of how programs like this inherently work. They are set up to re-encode the data because it receives the music as CD Audio/WAV format, uncompressed. There’s no way around the re-encoding, as it is a required step.

True, re-encoding to another lossy format will usually take some of the quality away. The only thing you can do is try to use the highest bit rate you feel comfortable with [requiring more space for the file]. Choosing a lower bit rate will lose more detail, but you won’t have such a big file. There is an option to change the bit rates.

OMINOUS ERROR MESSAGE UPON INSTALLATION
I got such a nasty error message upon installation. It stated that the free program had changed registry values that would probably halt operation of not only XP Media Player but also the functionality of the XP operating system. What gives?
I have not gotten an ominous message before. Can you take a screenshot?

The program should NOT cause the operating system or any of its components to fail if this software is installed properly.

Albert, you were recommended by Charlier over at the DVDNC forum. My original post from there can be found here http://www.dvdnextcopysupportforum.com/showthread.php?t=5165 In this post, I outlined my questions/concerns before attempting to use the program, and then proceeded to ask questions/concerns after using the FREE version. I guess Charlie is struggling with the 64-bit issue so much he doesn’t have the time to research this one out. He thought you might be able to answer a few of my questions.

My initial unanswered questions centered around the iTunes process of conversion. The question was a viable question since the original files from Audible are such poor quality any additional conversions can render the new files unacceptable. Even some Audible files are unacceptable due to the poor quality of the rip on either the publisher’s part or Audible’s part (i.e., sounds like it is read from inside a trash can). There have been some books that I have said, either fix it or give me a new book and gotten a new book.

Since that question went unanswered (Charlie attempted to ask DVDNC with no reply), I proceeded to install the program and see what it could do. What I do not understand is why the publisher of this software would not answer my questions. Like ANY idiot could not observe the operations of the program and figure out the overall logic of the program. Considering the time and resulting product of the program, it is OBVIOUS that the program uses a virtual drive to create a CDA file, it then proceeds to convert this file to an MP3 file with no tags and no protection on the file. The same process (minus the CDs) one might go through manually if ripping these files. The result is at least two conversions (first to the CDA format and second to the MP3 format). USING WHAT CODEC for the MP3 conversion (since not all MP3 codec are created equal)?

[QUOTE=Albert;2134691]I have not gotten an ominous message before. Can you take a screenshot?

The program should NOT cause the operating system or any of its components to fail if this software is installed properly.[/QUOTE]How can I double click on the program icon and install it improperly, isn’t this portion of the program automated and a no brainer? I am sorry, no screenshot because it has been installed and I was a bit too eager to start using the program to take a break in order to get a screen shot. Frankly, I did not concern myself with the installaltion because I intend on replacing my main harddrive. Also, during the installation I actually had XP ask if I wanted to create a restore point after which it sent the ominous “this will cause future problems” message. I am using the FREE program not the PRO version if this makes a difference.

iTurns appears to have set up a virtual drive which can be found under my hardware management. Is this to be expected? (I do understand that this is a key part of the logic of iTurns and a nice work around.) Curious as to how to change the drive letter. Under Disk Management, I do not appear to have the option to change the drive letter for this VD.

I have around 150 Audible books. This FREE program will actually save me quite a bit on CD’s because I typically burn the book to CD and then rip from those. I have software for renaming and organizing, but it is and always has been a big task to set up an audiobook in proper order and I have yet to retain the “audiobook” status in iTunes using this method. I was just hoping that from iTunes to iTurns, it might make the “Look Ma No Hands” leap to an automated ID3 tag import. (I can hope.) Since I am using the FREE version (which has no ID3 tag capabilities), I was also asking about the PRO versions capabilities in this area. Has anyone tested the ID3 tag import portion of the PRO version? Obviously you have tested the program on some files, but how about Audible or Audiobook files.

The ID3 tag submenu window has the word Abbrechen on it. Needs to be fixed. I assumed this mean cancel, quit, or something along those lines due to it’s placement on the window.

EDIT: The CD’s created in a “legitimate” burn do have title and artist information on them (as read by my stand alone sony player). For this reason I would say the information is there, but I am not sure to what extent. From what I have read (have not researched it extensively), retaining the iTunes “audiobook” status requires a conversion to MP4 then back to MP3 (like these files could take one more conversion). I may call iTunes and explain my situation to see if I can get a better answer (I have an extensive CD collection of audiobooks). The “audiobook” status sets up each book with an incorporated playlist. I do have MP3 with NO DRM that have retained the “audiobook” status, so the capability must be out there without going through more conversions.

Yes until I can get a update on Vista 64 support I have to wait. This is why I said to chat with Albert as he would understand you and what you are asking and assist if all possible as I have high respects for Albert as he is our tester here on cdfreaks.com

I am fully confident that if an answer can be brought about for now Albert is the main man and knows the program fairly well.

As for DNC Inc. the engineers are heavily busy working on a DNC V3 and those I did ask can not state what was asked again why I pointed you towards Albert. Now I bet Albert’s going to kill me :stuck_out_tongue:

[QUOTE=Ultra57;2135021]it is OBVIOUS that the program uses a virtual drive to create a CDA file, it then proceeds to convert this file to an MP3 file with no tags and no protection on the file. The same process (minus the CDs) one might go through manually if ripping these files. The result is at least two conversions (first to the CDA format and second to the MP3 format). USING WHAT CODEC for the MP3 conversion (since not all MP3 codec are created equal)?[/QUOTE]1) the files SHOULD [but, for some reason, do not always] have tags; this has been the case for me. However, I have only used Apple AAC files and MP3 files with normal to extensive tagging.

  1. [examining the folder into which the program is installed]:

It uses LAME to encode MP3s. I’ve had no issues with the LAME codec before, and haven’t had much issue now.

It uses FAAC to encode AAC files. I’ve never tried this encoder [knowingly] before this software, but conversions with it in this software were far from bad. :slight_smile:

I am sorry, no screenshot because it has been installed and I was a bit too eager to start using the program to take a break in order to get a screen shot. Frankly, I did not concern myself with the installaltion because I intend on replacing my main harddrive. Also, during the installation I actually had XP ask if I wanted to create a restore point after which it sent the ominous “this will cause future problems” message. I am using the FREE program not the PRO version if this makes a difference.
I don’t know why the program might give off an ominous message during install…it may be set up like that as a precaution, but the only thing the software has corrupted for me was a previous installation [which was in the early days of the software]. It should be perfectly harmless.
iTurns appears to have set up a virtual drive which can be found under my hardware management. Is this to be expected?
Yep, it is to be expected. It has to install a virtual drive using the standard Windows procedure…which means it gets an entry in the Device Manager. :slight_smile:
Curious as to how to change the drive letter. Under Disk Management, I do not appear to have the option to change the drive letter for this VD.
In Vista, I can change the drive letter with Disk Management. I cannot check XP anytime soon.

I have around 150 Audible books. This FREE program will actually save me quite a bit on CD’s because I typically burn the book to CD and then rip from those. I have software for renaming and organizing, but it is and always has been a big task to set up an audiobook in proper order and I have yet to retain the “audiobook” status in iTunes using this method. I was just hoping that from iTunes to iTurns, it might make the “Look Ma No Hands” leap to an automated ID3 tag import. (I can hope.) Since I am using the FREE version (which has no ID3 tag capabilities), I was also asking about the PRO versions capabilities in this area. Has anyone tested the ID3 tag import portion of the PRO version? Obviously you have tested the program on some files, but how about Audible or Audiobook files.
I haven’t tested Audible/Audiobook files…I haven’t had the chance. I know for a fact that it USUALLY works for my files. There have only been 2 times [out of 50+ tests] that a file failed to be tagged, and it could be repeated only with those same files.

From what I see after a quick Google search, any audiobooks downloaded using iTunes should be treated just as any other downloaded music…it should still be in Apple’s AAC format, just with a low bitrate. This means that they should have proper tagging. Can you afford to find an example Audible file in iTunes, right click the file, select “Get Info”, and navigate to the SECOND tab that has all the file tagging information? Then take a screenshot to see just how much of the data is filled out…this might help explain things [or further complicate them].

Also, as generic as this is, maybe double check that the option to write CD Text is enabled for the iTurns virtual drive?

Also also, can you try the program Mp3tag [ http://www.mp3tag.de/en/ ] to see if it can read the tags of your files? With this software, you may be able to have a semi-automatic tagging of files. [Read the tags from the old files to a text file, manually select the new files and have mp3tag write the new tags to the new files]. It claims to be able to do that, but I don’t know how easy it would be with protected files. This would only be a temporary work-around, but it’s an idea. :slight_smile:

EDIT: The CD’s created in a “legitimate” burn do have title and artist information on them (as read by my stand alone sony player). For this reason I would say the information is there, but I am not sure to what extent. From what I have read (have not researched it extensively), retaining the iTunes “audiobook” status requires a conversion to MP4 then back to MP3 (like these files could take one more conversion). I may call iTunes and explain my situation to see if I can get a better answer (I have an extensive CD collection of audiobooks). The “audiobook” status sets up each book with an incorporated playlist. I do have MP3 with NO DRM that have retained the “audiobook” status, so the capability must be out there without going through more conversions.
I don’t think it will be able to retain the audiobook status automatically. That might have to be done manually. The only data that iTunes can send is data that conforms to the CD Text specification, and most advanced flags [such as a file being an audiobook] are not carried over.

Looking at the [somewhat outdated] instructions found here: http://www.dagondesign.com/articles/turning-mp3-audiobooks-into-ipod-audiobooks/
I’d suggest that you change the encoder from MP3 to AAC in the options. This will allow you to skip the parts about re-encoding from MP3 to AAC, and skip to the line “You will notice that the new files have the .m4a extension. They must be renamed to .m4b.” in the aforementioned link.

And I don’t think the good people at Apple would help you with this all too much, because this is a nonstandard way to backup your files, and is not a direct part of iTunes.

The following appears to be a workaround that I have found, but I have still attempted to answer your questions.

LAME is excellent. Thank you for finding that information for me.

OK, it’s taken me a day, but my Google searches have proven quite productive. Not necessarily for iTurns, but for users (which means iTurns can incorporate the logic for a hands free version), tests look good for the free version if another free program is used. Only one glitch at this point (the artwork).

MP3 to iPod Audiobook Converter found at http://www.freeipodsoftware.com/. Problem with this software is that there is no documentation. So here is a rough outline of the process using both programs.

  1. Use iTurns Free to create the MP3 files.
  2. Bulk Edit the ID3 tag information with Album Title, Artist, Reader, Year, but not the track information or cover art. Don’t worry about the file names (although this would be a simple batch program to correct this issue).
  3. Use the freeipodsoftware, MP3 to iPod Audiobook Converter (unfortuantely, one more conversion needed to get the needed m4b file format), to put them in iTunes audiobook format (take an AAC or m4a file and rename it to m4b seems to be the actual fix so no conversion would be needed here if iTurns would convert to m4a format). Before you press the convert button in this program, make sure the files are in the order you want them played in. In the program window (drag and drop ability to rearrange the files before conversion).
  4. Bring it into iTunes using the “Add Folder to Library” option. Now the title (ID3 Album Title information) and author (ID3 Artist information) will be there (if you made sure the ID3 tags were correctly entered). The last step is to tell iTunes where the cover art is (I am still experimenting as to how to automate this process within iTunes). I have tried various locations on my computer and still working on this issue.

So the next question, will iTurns convert Audible files to the m4a or m4b file format rather than the MP3 file format?

CONCLUSION: iTurns needs an option to set the output format to AAC or m4a files (resulting in one less conversion in order to retain the audiobook status). Once all the files for the audiobook have been converted, the blanket editing of Artist and Title information is relatively easily automated (a little bit of user interface that I believe is in place on the PRO version but not sure). Renaming the file with the m4b file extension is relatively easy to automate. BUT there needs to be a file naming convention (to keep the files in order) would require something like D01T01, D01T02, D01T03 type prefix or suffix along with the title and maybe the author then the m4b extension. Each grouping of an Audible audiobook file can run up to 8 discs. iTurns is automatically setting up the logic to be 1. create a file called Disc 1, put the converted files in there with some “counter” logic with the base name being artist - title then a counter number that acts like a track number for all the tracks of the first pretend disc, 2. create a file called Disc 2, put the converted files in there with some counter logic with base name being artist - title then the counter number for all tracks of the second pretend disc. And we go on and on till we hit the end of the audiobook as defined by Audible and/or my playlist. I would hope that it would not be too difficult incorporate a leading 0 into this logic (a test for If 1-9 vs. 10 to 99then … could be an easy solution) but leading 0’s need to be incorporated on both the disc numbers and the title/track numbers for a no hands operation of the program. Otherwise the program is too labor intensive.

I haven’t tested Audible/Audiobook files…I haven’t had the chance. I know for a fact that it USUALLY works for my files. There have only been 2 times [out of 50+ tests] that a file failed to be tagged, and it could be repeated only with those same files.

From what I see after a quick Google search, any audiobooks downloaded using iTunes should be treated just as any other downloaded music…it should still be in Apple’s AAC format, just with a low bitrate. This means that they should have proper tagging. Can you afford to find an example Audible file in iTunes, right click the file, select “Get Info”, and navigate to the SECOND tab that has all the file tagging information? Then take a screenshot to see just how much of the data is filled out…this might help explain things [or further complicate them].

You are going to hate this one, How to I get a screen shot (not just the print screen button and copy to notepad solution) and send it to you (where do I send/store the files). That aside - from what I can gather, m4b format forces the “protected status” on a now audiobook file. When I do what you suggest Author (folder name used where iTunes stores an individual audiobook within the iTunes Music folder is the Artist information not the Author information), and a general description are the only editable items available to me that have information in them. Artist, title, track number and other information are not available to me to edit either in the Windows file window or through the iTunes program (why when you are using the MP3 to audiobook conversion program it is necessary to make sure you have edited the artist and other ID3 tag information BEFORE the conversion process [one of my first errors using the MP3 to audiobook program]).

Also, if you have an Audible audiobook, it is sectioned off into 10 to 12 minute chapterettes that are typically hidden to the user in both iTunes and Windows. In Windows, the audiobook section of the itunes library is filed under a particular Artist’s name in that iTunes library folder. All the chapterettes are contained in 1 to 12 files that comprise the total audiobook (typical book is about 2 of these files with a load of chapterettes). The only indication that a single Audible file has more than one file in it is the message from iTunes that you are about to edit more than one file, proceed with caution. On the other hand, when you convert a group of mp3’s or m4a’s into an audiobook (m4b file structure), then your chapterettes will be the individual original files joined together (sort of like a playlist but better).

When I attempt to edit ID3 tag information within the audiobook section of iTunes, I will get a warning window stating that I am about to edit multiple files and do you want to proceed nonsense. Well of course I want to, and proceed BUT I cannot change the title of my book or the artist information in this window. These two pieces of the original file create some of the organaization of how iTunes handles an audiobook (a file is created with the artist’s name and the title of the book shows up under the coverart). Coverart is manually added (at least at this point I am still researching this area. I know this is highly confusing but I tried.

You might suggest I use the m4a file format and add the artwork there, well I added artwork, blah blah blah there and it still lost the artwork when I converted it.

Also, as generic as this is, maybe double check that the option to write CD Text is enabled for the iTurns virtual drive?

I do not see that option under Disk Management, but I did scroll far enough to find the drive letter change.

Also also, can you try the program Mp3tag [ http://www.mp3tag.de/en/ ] to see if it can read the tags of your files? With this software, you may be able to have a semi-automatic tagging of files. [Read the tags from the old files to a text file, manually select the new files and have mp3tag write the new tags to the new files]. It claims to be able to do that, but I don’t know how easy it would be with protected files. This would only be a temporary work-around, but it’s an idea.
This has the same problem as iTunes and the Windows Property editor, cannot access the Artist, Title and other information. It appears that the m4b status locks out users from editing this information and designates the file “protected.”

If we are talking MP3 files, a program called SnackAmp has the ability to change the “title” in the ID3 tag to the file name. The file name can be batch programmed using the naming convention as described above. And Charlie, our Audiobook collection is almost as bad as our Video collection, OUT OF HAND. I just needed a break from videos. < - - - - - - - insert smiley going insane and pullling it’s hair out

:rolleyes:UPDATE: For some reason the edit capabilities in iTunes and my Windows “Properties” menu are working now. I could probably not recreate problem of an untitled un artworked audiobook if I wanted to.:rolleyes:

Maybe I was just doing too much multitasking.:confused: We will never know.

Gracious, I NEED “edit post” capabilities (I promise, I am not trying to intentionally bump my thread). I researched the CD-Text capabilities issue. This ability may not be available to me. I always did find it curious how that some drives would automatically read this information on audiobooks while others would not. I am on a brand new machine with a plain vanilla unlabled DVD burner, so finding it in the list was a bit impossible. The suggested list of burners appears to have burners that are a tad old and not available in the current market. Time to update the list? Anywho, I guess that could explain the reason that I am not getting the text.

OH WAIT, the burner I am using is the VD, so what gives? Shouldn’t the virtual drive created by iTurns automatically enable read/write the text capabilities? I went under Disk Management and the option to toggle this capability appears to be handled in the background or somewhere else and unavailable for the user to turn it on or off. Am I STILL missing something here? I will continue to research this area, but my other burners were plug and play, idiot proof, and performed this function automatically. Why would iTurns not enable this during the installation of the VD?

OK, because I can only tackle so much at once…;)[QUOTE=Ultra57;2135311][…]1. Use iTurns Free to create the MP3 files.[…]
So the next question, will iTurns convert Audible files to the m4a or m4b file format rather than the MP3 file format?[/QUOTE]Is there not an Options menu available for you in iTurns? [Settings>>Open Settings>>Encoder]

BUT there needs to be a file naming convention (to keep the files in order) would require something like D01T01, D01T02, D01T03 type prefix or suffix along with the title and maybe the author then the m4b extension.
In Windows Explorer, you can group the files by date modified, which will put them in order of how they were re-created. Then, after grouping them, you can batch rename them. [Select all the files, right click on one file, select “Rename”, and type a file name such as “000”. Then hit “Enter”, and watch all the files get renamed. That could be a small workaround. :)]

You are going to hate this one, How to I get a screen shot (not just the print screen button and copy to notepad solution) and send it to you (where do I send/store the files).
See this link: http://club.cdfreaks.com/faq.php?faq=vb3_reading_posting#faq_vb3_attachments

To do a screen capture, download FastStone Capture v5.3 from http://www.oldapps.com/old_version_FSCapture.php

After installing FastStone and running it, right-click on the icon in the system tray, select Settings, and change the options in the Auto Save box to “Output format: PNG” and “Colors: 256”.

Be sure to respect the following guidelines: the file must be smaller than 293.0 KB, and smaller than 760 pixels ACROSS. [So use the “Capture Rectangular Region” option in FastStone Capture, and make sure the dimensions are smaller than or equal to 760 x ___ pixels].

Why when you are using the MP3 to audiobook conversion program it is necessary to make sure you have edited the artist and other ID3 tag information BEFORE the conversion process [one of my first errors using the MP3 to audiobook program]).
I just suggested you ensure the tags are there, OR copy all the tag information FROM the old files TO the new files after they are created. If I misunderstood you here, please inform me. :slight_smile:

OH WAIT, the burner I am using is the VD, so what gives? Shouldn’t the virtual drive created by iTurns automatically enable read/write the text capabilities? I went under Disk Management and the option to toggle this capability appears to be handled in the background or somewhere else and unavailable for the user to turn it on or off. Am I STILL missing something here? I will continue to research this area, but my other burners were plug and play, idiot proof, and performed this function automatically. Why would iTurns not enable this during the installation of the VD?
The option to write CD Text to the virtual drive is handled by iTunes in the iTunes settings, NOT in iTurns and NOT by Windows, and I think the people at DVD neXt Copy would rather have you manually set the option for CD Text, rather than having the installer poke around in the registry to modify iTunes’ settings itself. :slight_smile:

OK, sorry it took so long in responding. I’ve had a really nasty cold and been in bed for two weeks. My husband knew it was bad when I didn’t fire up my computer for those two weeks. So to clarify and to answer your questions …

In iTunes, I do not have the option you are referring to (I have the current Version 8 which has made extensive changes to the preference area from version 7). I may need to go back to that restore point and reinstall the iTurns. iTunes is reporting that my virtual drive (VD) has a blank CD in it and would I like to burn something (not really a problem because I know this is a necessary evil to the logic of iTurns and this can be changed easily from within iTunes). Also, this may be what Windows got excited about. Who knows?

At this point I am still amazed that the FREE version is able to accomplish as much as it does. From what I can gather from your posts and reading the documentation, the $30 version adds the capability to convert to other file formats (including the necessary m3a with the simple renaming to m3b). The naming convention was my fault or user generated (as admitted above but probably got lost in my rantings).

In the past, I was burning the audiobooks to CD and then using a pretty good program to rip from the CDA format (resulting in poor results in file naming and ID3 tag). To fix the file names I create a batch program in notepad using an old utility that allows me to capture a list of the file names from a directory, and then use a nifty program called SnackAmp to fix the ID3 tags (will change the “title” to the file name in a batch process for a group of files). It does not fix the problem with the idiotic breaks created by Audible, but that would need to be handled by a third party software in any case (some type of joining and then splitting program based on a base time with the added criteria of a pause in the recording).

The main point of my ramblings was what does $30 buy me? And, what I, and anyone, should expect from a program that accomplishes stripping the “protection.” If you have a couple of songs here and there, it’s no big deal to fix filenames or ID3 tags. If you have an audiobook, it’s an ID3 tag giant project along with a second conversion to m4b (or a simple renaming with the iTurns $30 version). The same disaster I get when I rip them from a burned CD copy. You can always work around it, but that’s not what I want to pay $30 for is it? The process I go through is pedantic and consistently performed without change in the processes. Isn’t this what automation or a good working program is all about? I asked you questions that you could never answer (unless the programmers at iTurns thought out the process and developed the program accordingly), but I did outline the overall logic of what I would hope to expect from a program that worked with audiobooks.

Also, there are quite a few audiobook download companies that are using Windows Media Player for their protection. I know that Media Player will allow a burn and my VD is showing up there so I attempted a burn for my one audiobook from Simply Audiobooks. Guess what it works there also. That VD was a stroke of genius and my hat’s off to DVDNC for a great piece of software.

iTurns FREE version proves that the program does what it says it will do, strip the protection so I can use the music/audiobooks I paid for. The $30 version needs some improvements as outlined in the above posts. There are free programs that can: join all the tracks of one CD and then split based on a time criteria with a plus/minus on the length based on pauses in the recording (a necessary function for audiobooks); fix the ID3 tags and naming conventions that are necessary for the audiobook genre. Audiobooks are a unique problem due to the length and problems associated with the mess that distributors create when they produce these books, but this process should be able to be automated. After reading the documentation, I do not believe the programmers have considered the issues involving audiobooks. BUT, I do not believe that it is an obtainable goal was my final conclusion regarding iTurns. It just needs some work.

:flower: :kiss: Dogbert,

:bow:Thank you for your help and answers to some of the more answerable questions. :bow:

Please forgive the frustration level and shortness (not necessarily brevity) in my posts since I am looking at around 750 GB of audiobooks (with more to come due to the audio tapes I’m still in the process of converting from analog to digital [only four boxes to go:D]).

I sent my comments to the developers outlining my expectations for the PRO version with regards to audiobooks and they responded with a complimentary copy of the PRO version (I’ll get to test the PRO version a tad longer than the three days).

:flower: :kiss:Charlie (Dr. Who if it’s You),
Thank you for your help in getting me help and introducing me to a new forum that has some very interesting posts. A lot of information and help among it’s memebers. You are a sweetheart.

[QUOTE=Ultra57;2142558]:flower: :kiss: Dogbert,

:bow:Thank you for your help and answers to some of the more answerable questions. :bow:

Please forgive the frustration level and shortness (not necessarily brevity) in my posts since I am looking at around 750 GB of audiobooks (with more to come due to the audio tapes I’m still in the process of converting from analog to digital [only four boxes to go:D]).

I sent my comments to the developers outlining my expectations for the PRO version with regards to audiobooks and they responded with a complimentary copy of the PRO version (I’ll get to test the PRO version a tad longer than the three days).[/QUOTE]No prob. I did what I could to try to help. That’s why I’m here. :slight_smile:

Hope you can get your collection as you want it. :flower: