Question about DVD capacity

I heard DVD capacity is 4.3GB or 4,700,000 bytes. I was wondering if I were to burn a file that would exactly fit a DVD-R/+R disc, 4,700,000 bytes would fit exactly right? Is it okay to use up every single bits and or bytes on the disc, especially for archiving purposes? I am planning to make parity files though. Thanks.

Sure they’ll fit, but I’d stop a few MB short of the full capacity anyway. Discs are usually at their worst at the edges, I usually burn to about 4478mb on my discs. +R holds about 4483MB, -R about 4489MB.

If you use very high quality media such as Taiyo Yuden, in particular YUDEN000T02, I wouldn’t worry about overburning above 4483MB. Many agrees that in high quality media we can expect that the dye is evenly spreaded to the end of the disc, thus quality at the end of the disc is still maintained.

These pics show overburning YUDEN000T02 in various dvd burners (Plextor 716A, BenQ 1640, Sony DRU-810A) @4600MB.

True, if you are using great discs you can probably pull it off with alot of your burns. Even so, I’d still be hesitant to overburn on a frequent basis, I’d hate to have errors occur in the last 100mb of a disc to jeopardize all of the data. An example would be your second burn, the burn is fine but you can see that 95% of the PIF errors are at the very edge of the disc where you overburned. I’d be nervous about the errors increasing over time at that spot on the disc to the point where reading back the data at the edge may eventually become an issue a couple years down the road.

If you had an occasional disc to burn that went over in size, I’d say go for it, just use your best discs and check the disc after the burn to be sure it is readable. But I wouldn’t personally make it a common habit to overburn.

Quite true, even TY quality is different from disk to disk. You just need to be really careful especially for important data, ie check the disk quality scan and make sure transfer rate is smooth and not showing significant read-back problem… and make backups more often (not every couple years!).

PS: that PIF spikes in the second scan is nothing compare to many scary scans found in this forum. :wink:

It’s been observed that DVDRs have a tendancy to degrade faster at the edges…

So even with TY, for long-term archiving I would never overburn, and not even use the full capacity. About 4300MB is my usual limit.

Just my 2 cents. :slight_smile:

I agree with the above 100% - I can give lots of examples of genuine, top quality TYs I have here with visible dye defects at the edges, if you tilt them at the right angle under light you will notice as if some residue epoxy has leaked from the outer edge towards the center of the disc.

So far I have tried confronting TY about this and the sales rep has not replied, when confronted with this.

I have this affect all 100 of my TY +R discs and 100 of my CD-R discs…Although so far I have not had ONE coaster, and excellent kprobes from start to end.

its better to make allowance e.g 100mb rather than put at risk all your data. Like everybody says its better to avoid overburn, if needed make sure you’ve perform the quality scan to check the transfer rate whether there are signifiant degradation on the quality. Remember disc outer edges are prone to scratches and quality are still in question regardless how long you store your data or use the disc, sometime it was original defects from factory even genuine disc such TY had this circumtances. The frequent to use the prone to deteriorate your disc.

I’m not trying to overburn, but I was thinking of making the files fit perfectly on the DVD-R’s. I’m using TY DVD-R 8x medias. I have a Plextor 716-A too.

It was clear from your post :).

Our input with a different approach than Zevia’s may nevertheless help you choose what to do for archiving purposes.

So to summarize, if you use excellent discs like TY, you may generally fill the disc without problem and even overburn like Zevia demonstrates, but some people including me feel this is more risky for discs carrying important data for archiving purposes, and that some blank space should be left at the end.

Cheers :slight_smile:

the lead in and lead outs i thought acount for the less space, burn a dvd in roxio and it tells u the size of the lead in/lead out and its about the size thats less then 4.7gb

thats how i see it, anyone know the truth

Franksoy, nice summary.

Overburning is one thing and I was just showing that -with the right burner, media and write speed- you can achieve a “safe” result, if not excellent.

Now, the question in this thread is about burning at full disk capacity and I see some members suggested not to. Burning a full disk is very common and shouldn’t be worry at all, in my opinion (again with quality burner, media and a optimal write speed.) But you are of course entitled to your own preference. However, let me jog our memory a bit by reminding us that there are thousand tests, experiments and analysis in this forum, using Nero CD-DVD Speed “create data disk”, which always burn full disc. :wink:

I, for myself, suggest not to, only for long-term archiving, or when using second choice media. Otherwise I do fill my discs. :slight_smile:

Burning a full disk is very common and shouldn’t be worry at all, in my opinion (again with quality burner, media and a optimal write speed.)
Of course! :slight_smile:
let me jog our memory a bit by reminding us that there are thousand tests, experiments and analysis in this forum, using Nero CD-DVD Speed “create data disk”, which always burn full disc. :wink:
and which, may I add for readers (I’m not adressing you zevia, I know that you know pretty well about these things ;)), reveals if the media has any problem writing at the outer edge or not… so testing discs is paramount if one wants to take the “full burn” route, unless one uses proven top-notch media (thanks to CDFreak’s huge knowledge base :cool: ).

Yeah count me in as a confirmed under-burner. A long time ago I came to the conclusion that most discs fail near the end of the media so I generally like to underburn by about 100MB, sometimes even 200MB. Somehow I just feel that much safer knowing I’ve got that little bit of extra buffer between my data and the edge of the disc.

Of course it depends on how good the quality of your media is. I do agree that with good quality media you should be able to fill it to rated capacity without the slightest problem. On the other hand if you’re using Princo then it’s prudent not to exceed about 3.7GB (and that is no joke).

BTW, the same goes for CD-R. Yes in a perfect senario you can fill them to 100% capacity or even overburn slightly and all will be well. But if you want you allow for potential situations of a less then ideal nature then underburning can really save you from data loss. Take for example the various forms of disc deterioration. All the common ones that I’ve encountered tend to start from the outer edge and work inward. I’ve pulled out old burnt CD-R and found them starting to discolour (going milky translucent) from the outer edge inward. Other times I’ve had CD-R’s where the top refelective layer had started to peel and flake away, again starting from the outer edge. Thankfully in many cases where this happened the disc has been underburnt and I’ve been able to transfer the data before the “rot” got too far inward.

[QUOTE=Sgt_Strider;1155706]I heard DVD capacity is 4.3GB or 4,700,000 bytes. I was wondering if I were to burn a file that would exactly fit a DVD-R/+R disc, 4,700,000 bytes would fit exactly right? Is it okay to use up every single bits and or bytes on the disc, especially for archiving purposes? I am planning to make parity files though. Thanks.[/QUOTE]

It’s closer to 4,707,319,808 bytes which is about 4.38 GB or 4488.25 MB. Both DVD-ROM and DVD-R media have this same capacity. DVD+R media uses a smaller capacity by 7MB at 4,700,372,992 bytes. It also has bitsetting issues so avoid them unless you have such a drive.

Yo-

Were you aware that you just posted to a [B]6 1/2 year old post?[/B]