Push your SSD to the Limits

vbimport

#1

I just posted the article Push your SSD to the Limits.

This article is about how you can make an SSD bench more quickly!
For those of you that are puzzled by why your SSD does not bench as fast as it does for someone else – this article is for you.
In this article I am going to show you how you may make your bench results go faster and faster.

Click to read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/review/push-your-ssd-to-the-limits-2-66865/](http://www.myce.com/review/push-your-ssd-to-the-limits-2-66865/)

Feel free to add your comments below. 

Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

Thanks for the article.

I have the following comment:

Running your Windows in the High Performance plan will disable all power savings in the processor which will then run at maximum speed all the time as opposed to using the recommended Balanced power plan. The “[I]significant improvement over the default ‘Balanced’ Windows Power Plan[/I]” mentioned in the article is actually only 2%, so it’s not something I’d suggest using on your normal system in normal situations, not to mention on a laptop running on battery where it will be a colossal waste of power with no noticeable increase in performance [2% can be measured but it’s not noticeable].

In other words: Don’t make this adjustment to your system except for a brief period when you need to “win” at bench-marking.


#3

ROTFLCOPTER!

Major E-Peen :stuck_out_tongue:

Did you also over-provision the SSD also? :slight_smile:

My biggest question is, after all non-essential services have been disabled, does it result in a stable system? :slight_smile:

Also, have you tried overclocking your CPU, disabling all but 1 core?
Or failing that, disable all but two cores & run AS-SSD allocated to only a single core?

Also, with all power states disabled, what’s the increase in your PC’s usage/power bill?


#4

[QUOTE=DrageMester;2684537]Thanks for the article.

I have the following comment:

Running your Windows in the High Performance plan will disable all power savings in the processor which will then run at maximum speed all the time as opposed to using the recommended Balanced power plan. The “[I]significant improvement over the default ‘Balanced’ Windows Power Plan[/I]” mentioned in the article is actually only 2%, so it’s not something I’d suggest using on your normal system in normal situations, not to mention on a laptop running on battery where it will be a colossal waste of power with no noticeable increase in performance [2% can be measured but it’s not noticeable].

In other words: Don’t make this adjustment to your system except for a brief period when you need to “win” at bench-marking.[/QUOTE]

Hi Drage’

I agree, I run with the balanced power plan on a day to day basis

Regds, JR

p.s. 2% is a lot when going for gold :slight_smile:


#5

[QUOTE=debro;2684538]ROTFLCOPTER!

Major E-Peen :stuck_out_tongue:

Did you also over-provision the SSD also? :slight_smile:

My biggest question is, after all non-essential services have been disabled, does it result in a stable system? :slight_smile:

Also, have you tried overclocking your CPU, disabling all but 1 core?
Or failing that, disable all but two cores & run AS-SSD allocated to only a single core?

Also, with all power states disabled, what’s the increase in your PC’s usage/power bill?[/QUOTE]

lol

Hi Debro,

Stable after disabling services - for running AS SSD yes, for day to day use I’ve never tried but I suspect not :slight_smile:

I’ve not tried disabling cores. I have heard of people running something like Prime95 on one core during a bench run as an alternative to engaging the high performance plan and/or disabling C States.

Regds, JR


#6

Jr,

Thanks for the info and effort put into all this - much appreciated


#7

[QUOTE=24c;2684600]Jr,

Thanks for the info and effort put into all this - much appreciated[/QUOTE]

Hi 24c,

Great to see you over here :iagree:

Regds, JR


#8

Great article JR!

I always find it interesting from a technical perspective to see just how hard things can be pushed, at the extreme end of things, and this article has also improved my knowledge of SSDs.

[B]Wombler[/B]


#9

I have to say I am impressed. This is a great tutorial and guide, for those of us that like to get the most out of our SSDs, and get results like the reviewers do, this guide is something that should be stickied on the forum for a long time to come. Congrats JR.:wink:


#10

I will point out that with increasing energy costs, the price difference between a 256GB model and the next size up might not be so significant.

Assume a standard PC idles at 120w, for 2000hrs a year ( 6 hrs) a day, versus 300w due to overclocking and disabling the power Saving mode (video card, cpu, pcie, usb). 180w/1000 at 20c / kwhr, that equates to $72.00 /yr.
Probably more if you have extra hdds/opticals that aren’t sleeping.

These days that could buy an upgrade from a 128 to a 256GB, or even a spare 128GB to slap your OS on, or raid together.


#11

Point taken Debro

Regds, JR