Purchase, Pirate, Publicize: The Effect of File Sharing on Music Album Sales

vbimport

#1

Queen’s Economics Department Working Paper No. 1354

A January, 2016 working paper from a doctoral student at Queens’ University in Canada suggests that pirate downloads can help increase sales as much as substitute them. The paper establish a link between pirated downloads on a torrent tracker and album sales.

The research tracked downloads of 2,251 albums over half a year and correlate downloads on the tracker with album sales in the US.
The hypothesis is that albums that were heavily downloaded might see lower sales because of a higher availability in file sharing networks - or that they might see higher sales because of a “word of mouth” effect.

The analysis found that an increase in album downloads correlated to a drop of (just) 0.17% in physical album sales but a 0.21% increase in digital sales and concludes “… file sharing activity has a statistically significant but economically modest negative effect on legitimate music sales”.


#2

[QUOTE=Xercus;2769303]The analysis found that an increase in album downloads correlated to a drop of (just) 0.17% in physical album sales but a 0.21% increase in digital sales and concludes “… file sharing activity has a statistically significant but economically modest negative effect on legitimate music sales”.[/QUOTE]

I have the feeling that this outcome will be neglected by the music industry…or heavily disputed…:bigsmile:
Otherwise they would have to blame their high amount of crappy releases for ‘lost profits’ …:wink:


#3

[QUOTE=roadworker;2769317]Otherwise they would have to blame their high amount of crappy releases for ‘lost profits’ …;)[/QUOTE]

I can only acknowledge they do not seem to have any long term strategy to build and fund aspiring artists. Hence the album format suffers in the long run.
Growing up through the '70s and '80s, I have spent countless hours with a 12" cover in my hand while listening to music. Reading lyrics, following stories of a concept album, a hobby soon forgotten in the climate of today where you get three minutes with anothers song on your way to fame and glory. Failing that and its out for the most and then they have the guts to blame piracy… Short-sightedness at best.

If they want to bring the music buyers back to the CD format, they will have to start concentrating on sequencing and story, a wholeness to it all and backing up aspiring artists. Not ONLY singles… The latter approach will only ever bring single track download-buys. :rolleyes:

But alas, it will have to be someone else’ fault, and since they are obviously not capable of looking inwards, their own ignorance will become their fall. :doh:


#4

[QUOTE=Xercus;2769328]If they want to bring the music buyers back to the CD format, they will have to start concentrating on sequencing and story, a wholeness to it all and backing up aspiring artists. Not ONLY singles… The latter approach will only ever bring single track download-buys. :rolleyes:
[/QUOTE]

Valid point…but the problem is,that our kids are born in a totally different climate than we did,they don’t know any better…
That climate is changed to ‘fast sell,consume and disposal’ instead of delivering quality products which last for ages and being proud of it.
Integrity has changed for fast profit…


#5

That is true, still it is hard to deny that the quality work from yesteryear also sells to the younger consumers and judging by my daughter and her friends, they are still very interested in music, only now they listen to older music like we did in addition to newer releases… I also find it interesting that new artists like Mac DeMarco and Connan Mockasin find their way to their playkists as at least the latter must be considered rooted firmly in '60s Psychedelia.

Fwiw, I am absolutely sure they don’t come around with their MP3 players playing everything from the Beatles to Pink Floyd and Iron Maiden to please me :wink:

It is not all black and white though and with all due respect, there are high quality original music released today as well, only these days they are more often than not released on small and rather obscure labels.


#6

Did the study also include the potential impact of higher availability of the music on concert attendance? I know that I have attended more live shows when I am familiar with the music.


#7

[QUOTE=texasjackson;2769347]Did the study also include the potential impact of higher availability of the music on concert attendance? I know that I have attended more live shows when I am familiar with the music.[/QUOTE]

No it did not, but I think that is a dead giveaway and a positive side-effect for the artists.


#8

[QUOTE=Xercus;2769328]I can only acknowledge they do not seem to have any long term strategy to build and fund aspiring artists. Hence the album format suffers in the long run.
Growing up through the '70s and '80s, I have spent countless hours with a 12" cover in my hand while listening to music. Reading lyrics, following stories of a concept album, a hobby soon forgotten in the climate of today where you get three minutes with anothers song on your way to fame and glory. Failing that and its out for the most and then they have the guts to blame piracy… Short-sightedness at best.

If they want to bring the music buyers back to the CD format, they will have to start concentrating on sequencing and story, a wholeness to it all and backing up aspiring artists. Not ONLY singles… The latter approach will only ever bring single track download-buys. :rolleyes:

But alas, it will have to be someone else’ fault, and since they are obviously not capable of looking inwards, their own ignorance will become their fall. :doh:[/QUOTE]

They should focus on mastering it correctly too - no more crushing the dynamic range. Make it sound like it does on the original source.


#9

[QUOTE=hogger129;2769420]They should focus on mastering it correctly too - no more crushing the dynamic range. Make it sound like it does on the original source.[/QUOTE]

Oh man, while this part of the discussion is a little side-tracked… Indeed, the loadness war is killing music. Silence is music’s original alternative and I only wish they would use the entire dynamic range. Instead they now argue that we do not need better equipment as most music only spans about 12db and even classical recordings maxes out at 60db - No shit, there’s probably no equipment in use any more that can record a broader range :rolleyes:

That is why I’d rather buy old recordings from discogs and other online auctions, mostly to get the first CD edition (as it usually is the least compressed).
For ‘The Wall’ by Pink Floyd, they can stuff their remasters where the sun don’t shine, I only ever need ‘CDS 7 46036 8’ which has a sound comparable to the vinyl record… and yes, that includes both the ‘Discovery box’ and ‘Immersion’ edition which both suck elk-balls in comparison.
It can be even worse though, like for the two (three) first Boston releases where the remaster destroys any and all listening pleasure (and that includes this POS which sadly is in my collection)

As you probably notice, there’s no need to fuel my fire in this respect :bigsmile:


#10

I only have the 1994 remaster of [B]the wall[/B], but it sounds good to my ears and i am sure that there wasn’t a CD version available in Greece at that time (1984).
I dont dare to go anywhere near the +2000 most of them are to loud for my taste, and that comes from someone that likes to listen to death metal, I made the mistake of listing to some of the remastered versions of [B]peace sells but whos buying[/B] and a few more, so i had the pleasure of comparing it with the original release, and the extra loud and compressed new version didnt sound as good as the original CD.

Back on topic, as always people try to listen to something before they go and buy it, I remember that back in the 80’ and 90’s copying tapes and trading tapes was the best way to listen to new music, and from doing that I purchased a lot of LP’s that otherwise I would have never got.

So if something is good and you like it you will go and get it, and enjoy it for a long time.
Unfortunately the music industry only want to sell more, so sound and music quality isnt a priority, you only need to have more bass and sound louder to impress the young ones.


#11

[QUOTE=vroom;2769442]… as always people try to listen to something before they go and buy it, I remember that back in the 80’ and 90’s copying tapes and trading tapes was the best way to listen to new music, and from doing that I purchased a lot of LP’s that otherwise I would have never got.

So if something is good and you like it you will go and get it, and enjoy it for a long time.[/QUOTE]

Great points, exactly what I thought when reading it. I can not count how many times I have bought that LP/CD after getting a tape/USB stick/download/whatever first. Even presentations here in the [I]last album you listened to[/I] thread (from you a.o. :iagree:) has caused me to buy physical media and so never underestimate the power of word to mouth. I have also had good help on other sites breaking into styles and genres I would never have gotten into without being guided by fans of that genre/style. I can imagine it is like that also for movies, but we’ll have to wait to get that confirmed. For the record, such guidance has always led to several buyins which had never happened without the albums being presented.

Like the RedFox developer said, the industry like to stress that one download is one lost sale which is nothing but nonsense while your last point stand on solid rock… “If something is good and you like it you will go and get it, and enjoy it for a long time.” - and that means buying original physical media! :bow:


#12

Like the RedFox developer said, the industry like to stress that one download is one lost sale which is nothing but nonsense while your last point stand on solid rock… “If something is good and you like it you will go and get it, and enjoy it for a long time.” - and that means buying original physical media!

It’s because we DO care about our precious physical media that we’re using programs like AnyDvd,DvdFab,EAC,dBpoweramp and other rippers :iagree:


#13

[QUOTE=roadworker;2769452]It’s because we DO care about our precious physical media that we’re using programs like AnyDvd,DvdFab,EAC,dBpoweramp and other rippers :iagree:[/QUOTE]
shhh…the AACS and DMCA don’t want to hear it… they like to hear chaching…in their cash coffers not what we want.


#14

[QUOTE=coolcolors;2769455]shhh…the AACS and DMCA don’t want to hear it… they like to hear chaching…in their cash coffers not what we want.[/QUOTE]
:bigsmile:

It is true though, when that media is available only 19, 49, 99 or 499 other places on this planet, it is nothing short of “my precious”, some only ‘rumored to exist’ - Without the possibility of a backup, none could be played ever!
With the availability of programs like the ones mentioned by roadworker, it means they can be played as often as I like. I am absolutely sure such rarities exists also in the DVD/Blu-ray world, deleted releases which never made it to the general public… all of which resides far from any direct sunlight, packed in various layers of coating to ensure keeping moisture out and fading of the colors of the cover/disc will never happen.

I know, the collector’s realm, still here’s to all programs that makes us able to play while keeping our investments safe :bow:


#15

I know, the collector’s realm, still here’s to all programs that makes us able to play while keeping our investments safe :bow:[/QUOTE]
But AACS and DMCA can’t see past where the sun doesn’t sun.


#16

[QUOTE=coolcolors;2769468]But AACS and DMCA can’t see past where the sun doesn’t sun.[/QUOTE]