PS3 hack case: Geohot ordered (again) to surrender HDD to Sony

PS3 hack case: Geohot ordered (again) to surrender HDD to Sony.

[newsimage]http://static.rankone.nl/images_posts/2011/02/VKoeTw.jpg[/newsimage]Another development has unfolded in the PS3 hack court case, this time with Sony scoring another win. District Court Judge Susan Illston has reconfirmed her order that George "Geohot" Hotz must surrender his HDD to Sony, allowing the company to inspect the contents of his hard disk drive and copy out any data that is related to hacking a PS3.


Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/ps3-hack-case-geohot-ordered-again-to-surrender-hdd-to-sony-39999/](http://www.myce.com/news/ps3-hack-case-geohot-ordered-again-to-surrender-hdd-to-sony-39999/)


Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

I wonder if his HDD is TrueCrypted. :slight_smile:

[QUOTE=Mr. Belvedere;2574623]I wonder if his HDD is TrueCrypted. :)[/QUOTE]
Ha! That would be awesome. I also wonder if it would be legal for him to encrypt it now, since the judge ordered him not to delete any pertinent data, but probably said nothing about encrypting it. :smiley:

Who’s to say he didn’t delete the info back at the start of this. Or who’s the say that he remove the hdd at the beginning of this so there was no hdd in his place.

I think any encryption scheme could be broken and unencrypted using DoD methods, especially for legal reasons like this.

Since it doesn’t seem that they can positively identify the hard drive he used in his computer during this, whats to stop him from getting another drive that has never had anything incriminating written to it and loading Windows/ Linux on it as a fresh install? Maybe he could sprinkle some URL links in his browser that are public knowledge to give them something to chew on for a while.That would satisfy the courts (sort of) since he never had anything on it in the first place ( as far as they know).

I understand it’s evidence tampering but he could hide/ destroy the original disk and just giove them the new one. I don’t think they could reasonably prove, beyond a shadow of a doubt that this wasn’t the original drive. All they could do is speculate. I don’t think speculation legally holds up in court very well.

[QUOTE=DOS_equis;2574750]I think any encryption scheme could be broken and unencrypted using DoD methods, especially for legal reasons like this.[/quote] There are several cases in which no one was able to crack a well configured TrueCrypt volume. Here is one of them. Of course anything can be broken given enough time and power, but it will be very very tough.

[QUOTE=Mr. Belvedere;2574765]There are several cases in which no one was able to crack a well configured TrueCrypt volume. Here is one of them. Of course anything can be broken given enough time and power, but it will be very very tough.[/QUOTE]

I had no idea that there was one encryption scheme that could keep the feds busy like that. I thought they were all crack-able, especially by the NSA or FBI. It does mention that the guy used two encryption apps to secure the drive, with probably a passphrase on each that would make the Kryptos look like it was written in pig latin. :slight_smile:

If it is encrypted, I hope GeoHot used something better than MS Bitlocker.

this is to funny,all this money on a useless lawsuit flushed down the toilet where they could use it to improve the console,like cross game chat or give the option like M$ to install the game to the harddrive to save the laser,that would make to much sence,

Pull the hdd, install new hdd, install os, transfer anything he wants.
Give the hdd to anyone interested. No deletion :wink:

[QUOTE=DOS_equis;2574769]I had no idea that there was one encryption scheme that could keep the feds busy like that. I thought they were all crack-able, especially by the NSA or FBI.[/quote] It is, but is it worth the enormous resources (power, cpu cycles and therefore money)?

Encryption and security should not be considered unbreakable, but a big burden to eventually get bypassed. If this burden takes enormous amount of money, most will let it go.

If it is encrypted, I hope GeoHot used something better than MS Bitlocker.
MS Bitlocker isn’t that bad. It’s just closed software.

[QUOTE=Mr. Belvedere;2575032]It is, but is it worth the enormous resources (power, cpu cycles and therefore money)?[/QUOTE]

I see what you are saying. It’s a cost/ reward ratio. When cost exceeds the perceved value of the data then it’s time to hang it up and call it a day.

MS Bitlocker isn’t that bad. It’s just closed software.

I didn’t really say or mean it was bad. I don’t use it myself or any other encryption method (nervous about a PC crash and not being able to recover the encrypted data, plus I don’t have anything to hide really) I was just implying that MS Bitlocker would probably be weaker than TrueCrypt and since he really has something to hide, he needs the tightest encryption out there. I guess that the encryption wouldn’t matter anyway because if he handed over the locked drive without telling them it was that way, he would then have to give up the passkeys eventually or face contempt charges on top of what ever else he gets convicted of. Not to mention it makes him look real guilty giving them a locked up drive.

I hope he gets off scott-free but i have a feeling he will have some kind of punishment handed to him. Otherwise it will open the floodgates for the hacking community.

Give them the “Porn Hard Drive”, that should tie government officials up for a good 6 months to a year.

Exactly! A cost/risk/reward ratio. I could break into your house given unlimited time and resources.

If i really really want to break into your house, despite that there is a moat, tesla coils, crocodiles, an acid bath and a vacuum room to pass, i will succeed, because i can buy and use stuff to circumvent that.

I didn’t really say or mean it was bad. I don’t use it myself or any other encryption method (nervous about a PC crash and not being able to recover the encrypted data
That’s why we have encrypted backups of course.

, plus I don’t have anything to hide really
You might think that, but i doubt you would like everybody to know your sexual preferences, your credit card number and stuff like that. Some things are just private and there’s no shame in that.

I was just implying that MS Bitlocker would probably be weaker than TrueCrypt and since he really has something to hide, he needs the tightest encryption out there.
There is no telling MS Bitlocker can be easily cracked, since forensics do not give out their methods, but i think it’s easier for a government agency to convince Microsoft than to concinve some open source program.

I guess that the encryption wouldn’t matter anyway because if he handed over the locked drive without telling them it was that way, he would then have to give up the passkeys eventually or face contempt charges on top of what ever else he gets convicted of.
One is not obliged to cooperate into your own jurisdictional judgement in my country. I don’t know if the same applies for George Hotz.

Not to mention it makes him look real guilty giving them a locked up drive.
That is an often used, but very dangerous implication. it is one of the fallacies. Read all about those things right here. Warning: Using them may anger people a lot.

I hope he gets off scott-free but i have a feeling he will have some kind of punishment handed to him. Otherwise it will open the floodgates for the hacking community.
Meh, i think the gates are already wide open. It will not matter what kind of punishment he gets, because someone else will take over.

If he has not been charged, then there is no legal recourse to hand over any materials. Just because the government tells him to. He needs to lawyer up, and stick it to “The Man”. Let me guess, they’ll charge him with “Contempt” and try to get it by force. If I were in his shoes, I’d tell the Judge to screw himself, if I’m not being charged with a crime, then you have no rights to my property. If you come and try to take it, remember Ruby Ridge.