Price Point, Dual Layers, 811 and such

Maybe it’s just me (being new here and all), but for a price point of $116 including tax for a 811, seems to be the best buy.

Now, the 8X +R is also possible with the 811 (i’ve had mine only a few weeks), then of course, I start to read about dual layers, nice, as it will allow for even higher resolution on backing up movies.

But heres a few things I’m thinking about.

1st, the price point and speed, dual layer will be pricey and so won’t the media…

2nd The speed, they are only at 2.4 for dual layer,

3rd, most will argue that slower speeds are better for movies, then the above is moot, however, so isn’t having a 8X.

The bottom line, for me anyway, is a 8X + or - R DVD burner that can be had for less than $120. One year from now, maybe even in the summer, dual layer may be cheaper, but for me, speed is key, give me 4.8 at least, or 9.6X, then you’ll (manufactures) will have my attention, but by then, (1 year) perhaps blue discs ($20,000???) may start to flow into mainstream (25 and 50 GIGS per disc),

but for now, I’ll gladly stick with a single layer DVD burner that cost me almost as much as my SONY CDR a year ago, and holds 7 times as much info.

Just my thoughts…and ramblings…
:cool:

PS. Is just sort-of ironic that there is on one hand, the argument, and overclocking to make your drive faster, when slower (for some functions (movie backup) is required and will the cost of one DL disc = less than the cost of two single layer DVD’s, doubtful, at least at the onset. Of course, then there’s compatibility issues with stand alones and PC drives.

I think it’s a good thing (dual layer) and the entertainment biz (film) won’t be too happy, but until it gets “real” main stream, compatible, …

  1. Set top DVD players will most likely be very picky with dual layer discs, at least the first gerneration of them anyway.

Exactly, and it until it becomes mainstream, I tend to NOT want to play guinea pig - especially especially with the almost 100% problems that will arise at the begining. (ie. just like Win XP 64, it’s out, but there are many drivers not ready yet…)…

…plus of course, the lower pricing that the older (single layer) dvd’s and media will receive.

I think it comes down to this…

If your going to back up a movie, then dual might be good, less compression, but will burn slow, then…will it play in your current DVD stand-alone.

However, using DVD shrink NOW for most movies and compressing at 70% turns our an image better than VHS…and with current dvd’s

Then there is the data issue, what will take longer, backing up 8 GIGS at 8X to two DVD’s or one DUAL layer DVD at 2.4 speed?! Something we’ll have to wait and see on.

But the real KEY to the future on this technology (and others) will be, when the media becomes fast enough (RW format), that you can record audio, video directly to DVD as fast as a HD, this technology (which ever can first) will be the winner…

If your going to back u

Originally posted by retroz
[B]
But the real KEY to the future on this technology (and others) will be, when the media becomes fast enough (RW format), that you can record audio, video directly to DVD as fast as a HD, this technology (which ever can first) will be the winner…

[/B]

sounds a little bit likd dvd-ram eh? but we can all see that its FAR off from being crowned some form of winner except for miniscule niches.

If i am a betting man, all my money will go with dual layer DVD drives. Forget about Blueray or AOD, at least for now. It’s just simple fact that there is no demand for that type of capacity in mainstream yet. HDTV folks will keep saying they needs HD-DVD recording. HDTV itself is not even widely-used yet. Let alone recording in HD format. I’m pretty sure that they have to wait for a while… long while before they can see that happening.

However, even dual layer drive will not go to mainstream that fast though. Considering media and drive cost, it will make no economical sense to back up a $10-$15 movie with a $300 burner and a $5 disk. Early adopters (geeks like us) (and probably some people who don’t know how to add :slight_smile: ) are pretty much only people will buy the drives in such early state. Fortunately, just like all technology, eventually price will come down to where current DVD burners or even CD burners are. But that could take a while from here though. Wait all you want, you will never get to enjoy any technology if you keep on waiting. :bigsmile:

Originally posted by simplelife
[B]If i am a betting man, all my money will go with dual layer DVD drives. Forget about Blueray or AOD, at least for now. It’s just simple fact that there is no demand for that type of capacity in mainstream yet. HDTV folks will keep saying they needs HD-DVD recording. HDTV itself is not even widely-used yet. Let alone recording in HD format. I’m pretty sure that they have to wait for a while… long while before they can see that happening.

However, even dual layer drive will not go to mainstream that fast though. Considering media and drive cost, it will make no economical sense to back up a $10-$15 movie with a $300 burner and a $5 disk. Early adopters (geeks like us) (and probably some people who don’t know how to add :slight_smile: ) are pretty much only people will buy the drives in such early state. Fortunately, just like all technology, eventually price will come down to where current DVD burners or even CD burners are. But that could take a while from here though. Wait all you want, you will never get to enjoy any technology if you keep on waiting. :bigsmile: [/B]

For a long time, those HDTV folks have used D-VHS tapes to store HD video. In South Korea, people gather offline and exchange D-VHS tapes of HD video.

It’s just a matter of what you need and what you choose. For CD people, they might feel DVD isn’t really necessary. For most DVD users, HDTV seems so far on the horizon. For HDTV enthusiasts, DVD is simply a matter of “eyes hurt.” Mainstream 1920x1080-ready notebooks cost under US$2000 per unit. Mainstream HDTV units cost under US$500 per unit. Mainstream HDTV PCI cards cost under US$100 per unit. They are ubiquitous. Saying ubiquitous does not necessarily mean they have to be literally everywhere, like in a village in the Amazon. Communities like AVSforum and AVKorea thrive. They don’t have to be billions to make HD on PC reality.

Of course, for individuals who just don’t care about HDTV and HD-DVD these things shouldn’t matter too much. For related industries, they should. Ritek and LG are diligent and wise enough to invest their best part of money and efforts on the HD future. This week saw the launching of US$10,000,000,000-worth LG LCD lines, exactly for very slim and inexpensive HD-friendly monitors and televisions, in Paju, South Korea. The largest media manufacturer, Ritek, has prepared for Blu-ray and AOD for at least half a year. In the end, the coming three years will present more revenues and profits for HD-DVD than for DVD Dual Layer. I mean the PC storage, not the entermainment industry.

Ahhh, don’t you love how DVD quality makes your “eyes hurt”? Similar to how VHS is worse in quality compared to a nice cable signal :Z

The reason HD hasn’t quite caught on yet is because of the lack of true HD programming. Not many people want to spend $500 on a HDTV reciever for only 5-10 channels. But it is slowly changing, over the next few years as more channels become available you will really see HD explode in N.America. :bigsmile: