Premiere Elements noticeably lowers quaility of VOB video image. Please Help

vbimport

#1

I have many old VHS tapes that I copied to DVD. I bought Adobe Premiere Elements 3.0 so I could edit them. Here’s the problem: The quality of the video on the DVDs is great. But when I put the VOB into Premiere Elements 3.0 the video quality suffers noticeably. I ran the video through Media Player Classic and it looks fine. I guess APE doesn’t like VOBs. Or, should I be converting the VOBs into another format? Needless to say I am new at this. I’ve looked at the tutorials but haven’t found anything about this problem. Is there something I didn’t set properly in Premiere Elements? Should I have gotten different editing software? Any help is greatly appreciated.


#2

I think the best way to copy a great number of VCR tapes to DVD is with a stand alone DVD recorder and a Video stablizer (if needed). Using PC software and a capture card not the best. Another option is Plextor PX-M402U to do the conversion.


#3

Thanks CCRomeo,

But I think you missed my point. I have already copied all the VHS tapes to DVD using my Panasonic VCR/DVD burning combo. The DVD’s look great. The problem, of course, is that when I recorded the tapes I got hours of boring video. So now I have hours of boring DVD’s. I want to edit them into something watchable. Adobe Premiere Elements 3.0 does the trick EXCEPT for the quality loss. Before putting the video into Elements I replayed the copied DVD on another DVD player and it looked great. But after editing with Elements there is a very large loss of quality (you can see what almost appear to be “trails” when someone moves). It looks this way only in Elements (and of course in the resulting DVD burned from Elements). Has anyone had this problem?


#4

“I have many old VHS tapes that I copied to DVD”

It looks like he has already moved the video from VHS to dvd disks. His problem is that Premiere Elements is degrading the quality of the video, probably because it is reencoding them after he edits.

What exactly are you doing when you are editing? Are you just cutting out sections or are you doing something more intensive?

You might try the free trial of Womble Video Wizard DVD, just to see if you get better results. Here is the link

Edit: I’ve got to learn to type faster


#5

Try a free trial of Ulead MovieFactory 5


#6

You may have one of 2 probs:
The video you watch on TV and on the PC can use two distinct display principles if the default settings still consider the old crt tv sets - prob of interlaced or not.
New flat screens can be dif and use the pc way.
VOB it is not an editable file format for most video editing programs - is APE able to handle them or do you need to import them in order you get normal Mpeg2 editable files? (I assume APE can handle these ones).
You can try others - for better editing facilities I would suggest VideoStudio instead of MovieFactory - but I’d check these points before going to another solution.


#7

Hi agomes,

I put the straight VOB into APE and it seems to edit it just fine. The loss of video quality happens immediately upon inserting the VOB into APE on the computer AND shows the same loss when burned to a DVD and shown on a TV. The only other player I have that will show VOB on my computer is Media Player Classic and it looks fine.


#8

The dif APE/MPC when you play the VOB has no relation to the degraded image you get when you burn the DVD again.
Every time you encode/(re)encode a file you risk to loose something, but if the dif is noticeable it may be (1) the way APE edits VOBs as this is not a file format intended for edition (2) the quality of the DVD compiling codec, that can make a difference depending on design and the selected encoding methods - are you using VBR and if so how many passages?
For me, I’d prefer to edit the files as normal DVD compatible Mpeg2 files and leave the final encoding get new VOBs, unless just for simple cuts and if I could use a process/package that doesn’t re-encode the non changed parts, and APE doesn’t seem to be an application built for that.