Post and discuss your CPU overclock

vbimport

#1

Post and discuss your CPU overclocks in this thread.

Let’s keep the rules to a minimum.

[ul]
[li]The overclock must be stable.
[/li][li]You must post a screenshot proving the CPU clock speed, and in the same screenshot, proof that the overclock is stable, vcore used, and max core temperature.
[/li][/ul]

You must also post the following information.

[ul]
[li]CPU overclock frequency.
[/li][li]CPU make and model.
[/li][li]Motherboard make and model.
[/li][li]Max CPU core temperature.
[/li][li]CPU VCore
[/li][li]CPU cooling solution.
[/li][/ul]

You can use either AIDA64, Prime, or Linx for stability testing.
Remember stress testing a CPU can damage the CPU, so let’s keep the stability test short. 10 minutes should be enough, so the minimum stability run should be at least 10 minutes.

Use CPUZ to show the CPU model, overclocked CPU frequency, and vcore.
Use which ever application you like to show max core temperature, and also remember to show all these in the same screenshot, including the stability test.

The staff here will add the results to the first post, including the members name, and overclock achieved.

I think it would make sense to have two tables of results. One for Intel and another for AMD.

Intel overclocks
UTR Intel Q8300 3.6GHz
Dee: - Intel 3770K 4.4GHz
Dee - Intel 2600K 4.6GHz
Acreo Aeneas - Intel Q9550 3.4GHz

AMD overclocks


#2

I’ll start it off. :slight_smile:

Overclock: 4.4GHz
CPU: Intel 3rd generation core i7 (Ivy Bridge) 3770K
Motherboard: Asus P8Z77 V Deluxe
MAX CPU core temperature: 73C
CPU Vcore: 1.192V
CPU cooler: CoolerMaster Hyper 212 EVO



#3

That’s an almost identical spec to my brother’s fairly new PC and I’d been hoping to get some advice for him here.

Is this sort of speed typical for this sort of spec, are there any further tweaks, or has anyone here managed to beat this and if so how?

Sorry for all the questions but my knowledge of overclocking isn’t all that great. :o


#4

4.4GHz should be quite easy for nearly all 3770K CPUs, and possibly 3570K CPUs.
The Ivy Bridge die runs hot, but it doesn’t produce a lot of heat. The problem is getting the heat from the die to the internal heat spreader. Once the heat is transferred to the heat spreader, most good air cooling solutions have no problem in cooling this CPU.

The key to Ivy Bridge overclocking is using a low VCore. Once you go above a VCore of 1.28V, then you have problems.

My particular 3770K will do 4.7GHz at just under 1.3V, but it just gets too hot.
4.5GHz is ok, but 4.6GHz struggles a bit in summer when the ambient temperatures are quite high.

You will never know what the CPU can do until you try it yourself, but 4.4GHz to 4.5GHz should be quite easy.


#5

[QUOTE=Dee;2645453]4.4GHz should be quite easy for nearly all 3770K CPUs, and possibly 3570K CPUs.
The Ivy Bridge die runs hot, but it doesn’t produce a lot of heat. The problem is getting the heat from the die to the internal heat spreader. Once the heat is transferred to the heat spreader, most good air cooling solutions have no problem in cooling this CPU.

The key to Ivy Bridge overclocking is using a low VCore. Once you go above a VCore of 1.28V, then you have problems.

My particular 3770K will do 4.7GHz at just under 1.3V, but it just gets too hot.
4.5GHz is ok, but 4.6GHz struggles a bit in summer when the ambient temperatures are quite high.

You will never know what the CPU can do until you try it yourself, but 4.4GHz to 4.5GHz should be quite easy.[/QUOTE]
The heat issue with the 3770K has been the only reason I have not overclocked it past 4.0ghz. I am getting idle temps at 36 to 40C , granted my ambient temps are high also but with the 2700K the temps are 5 to 7 degrees lower in all cores.


#6

I don’t have anything fancy but is still more than meets my needs.


#7

So you did a 44% overclock? You say it’s nothing fancy, but I didn’t even know it’s possible! How did you achieve this!?


#8

[QUOTE=Bakst0ne;2645560]So you did a 44% overclock? You say it’s nothing fancy, but I didn’t even know it’s possible! How did you achieve this!?[/QUOTE]

I credit the motherboard as much as anything else. It will run the FSB at 480 mhz rock stable. It also lets me run the DDR3 1866 RAM at 1920 mhz. I can run the CPU stable at 3.8 ghz but I get better memory performance at the lower FSB speed. Without a good motherboard overclocking locked CPUs a great amount is very difficult.

I have been very impressed with the last runs of the 45nm 775 socket Intel CPUs. I have a dual core that runs at 4 ghz using the stock CPU fan/heatsink. I use a relatively cheap Rocketfish CPU cooler that I added an extra fan. I make sure I have good airflow through the case which is a midtower Antec (4480?). It also helps to have good RAM with good timing specs.

I doubt I will be buying anything new for a while as what I have runs pretty darn fast for what it is. It is a good example of why I love overclocking. It increases the longevity of a system well past its typical expiration date.


#9

Some interesting advice in there Dee and UTR.

A lot of you seem to be referring to heat issues so I take it some sort of additional cooling may be required.

How do I read the CPU temperatures and what’s an acceptable maximum with modern CPUs?


#10

[QUOTE=JudgeMental;2645634]Some interesting advice in there Dee and UTR.

A lot of you seem to be referring to heat issues so I take it some sort of additional cooling may be required.[/QUOTE]

When just about any computer component (CPUs, RAM, motherboard chips etc.) is overclocked it generates more heat (especially when voltage is increased) and the buildup of heat is many times what limits substantial overclocking. It is also possible for two identical components to have very different overclocking ability. The only difference between the same CPUs that are sold at different clock speeds is that the faster ones are the parts that have been tested to run at higher clock speeds. The early versions of CPUs typically don’t overclock as well as the CPUs manufactured at later dates. This is a result of the manufacturing process being continually tweaked to maximize production efficiency for the production run of that processor.

So, yes, it is important to have a good CPU cooler, fast RAM with heat sinks attached and especially a case that moves a lot of air through it. It is also important where fans are placed and their direction of flow. I use the method of expelling air at the top of the case while pulling air into the bottom of the case. Without good case airflow, substantial overclocking is nearly impossible to achieve because hard drives, video cards, media drives etc. all produce a lot of heat.

[QUOTE=JudgeMental;2645634]How do I read the CPU temperatures and what’s an acceptable maximum with modern CPUs?[/QUOTE]

Most motherboard manufacturers have utilities for download that gives all kinds of information regarding motherboard functions. Most also have software to overclock CPU, RAM etc. but I prefer to log into BIOS and change settings there. It seems to be a more stable way to overclock, IMO. There are also many free utilities that do the same except for overclocking.

As for temperatures, I can only speak regarding socket 775 CPUs. Most of them will run stable with CPU temps under 58-60 degrees Celsius. I think cores in my Q8300 run at 48-52 degrees at 100% load.


#11

Overclock: 4.6GHz
CPU: Intel 2nd generation core i7 (Sandy Bridge) 2600K
Motherboard: AsRock Z68 Extreme 4
MAX CPU core temperature: 78C
CPU Vcore: 1.336V
CPU cooler: Arctic Freezer 13



#12

Just built my new rig with a 3770K. Haven’t attempted to OC it yet. Not really sure where I should start. I feel kind of lost with the new UEFI BIOS and the rather long guides I’ve bookmarked. I’m still rather new to OCing. I’m not exactly adverturous either. Last OC was on my old Q9550 with a Corsair A70 air cooler. Pushed her to 3.4 GHz and then later 3.6 Ghz and that’s where she has stayed for the last year and some.

Can I just change the multis? Do I even have to up voltage to OC mines to 4.4 Ghz?

Here’s the CPU-Z validation for my old Q9550 @ 3.4 GHz: http://valid.canardpc.com/show_oc.php?id=1217326

Never updated it for the 3.6. Probably should. I don’t have a screenshot showing core temps (idle or load). No extra voltage was applied. I’ll update it again sometime. I’ve relegated the machine to be a development rig.

Overclock: 3.4 Ghz
CPU: Core 2 Quad Q9550
Mobo: ASUS P5Q
Max CPU Core Temp: ~68 C

  • ambient is about 70 F with a window air conditioner going. Just going off of memory as I have RealTemp running on that machine constantly. This is from recent memory over the past few months. Average max temp that RealTemp recorded (lots of gaming sessions).
    CPU Vcore: default
    CPU Cooler: Corsair A70 (full speed, no resistor installed to slow down the fans)



#13

[QUOTE=Acreo_Aeneas;2654040]Just built my new rig with a 3770K. Haven’t attempted to OC it yet. Not really sure where I should start. I feel kind of lost with the new UEFI BIOS and the rather long guides I’ve bookmarked. I’m still rather new to OCing. I’m not exactly adverturous either. Last OC was on my old Q9550 with a Corsair A70 air cooler. Pushed her to 3.4 GHz and then later 3.6 Ghz and that’s where she has stayed for the last year and some.

Can I just change the multis? Do I even have to up voltage to OC mines to 4.4 Ghz?

Here’s the CPU-Z validation for my old Q9550 @ 3.4 GHz: http://valid.canardpc.com/show_oc.php?id=1217326

Never updated it for the 3.6. Probably should. I don’t have a screenshot showing core temps (idle or load). No extra voltage was applied. I’ll update it again sometime. I’ve relegated the machine to be a development rig.

Overclock: 3.4 Ghz
CPU: Core 2 Quad Q9550
Mobo: ASUS P5Q
Max CPU Core Temp: ~68 C

  • ambient is about 70 F with a window air conditioner going. Just going off of memory as I have RealTemp running on that machine constantly. This is from recent memory over the past few months. Average max temp that RealTemp recorded (lots of gaming sessions).
    CPU Vcore: default
    CPU Cooler: Corsair A70 (full speed, no resistor installed to slow down the fans)[/QUOTE]Nice overclock on that Q9550 :clap:

Welcome to the forum.
I’ll also be putting together a guide on how to overclock Sandy Bridge and Ivy Bridge CPUs.
The guide wont be for extreme overclockers, more a guide on how to overclock and still have low power consumption.


#14

[QUOTE=Dee;2654082]Nice overclock on that Q9550 :clap:

Welcome to the forum.
I’ll also be putting together a guide on how to overclock Sandy Bridge and Ivy Bridge CPUs.
The guide wont be for extreme overclockers, more a guide on how to overclock and still have low power consumption.[/QUOTE]

Thanks. :slight_smile: 3.6 GHz was easy, really easy. Just had to bump up the bus speed. Didn’t have to touch anything else, bump bus to 400 and bam, I have 3.6 Ghz and stable for over a year. I never pushed her beyond that (though lots on OCN say I could have hit 4.2 GHz with my cooler). I never did because without the AC, the CPU would hit 78 C sometimes with just that moderate overclock. Wasn’t about to go for a higher OC if it meant potentially shortening/frying my processor.

I also OC’d my old C2D E8400 to 3.4 GHz. It wouldn’t take a bus bump to 400. Hell I couldn’t get her to post at anything beyond 3.4 GHz with just a bus bump. So she’s stayed at 3.4 GHz for over a year and I’ve used her mostly for LAN parties. Now though with her rather low-end specs, I’m not sure what to do with her yet.

Now I’m really tempted to push my 3770K. How should I go about OCing it? Should I just bump the multi up? Do I need to turn off Turbo?


#15

You can probably get the 3770K to 4GHz by just setting the multiplier to 40.
You’ll need to set the multiplier to manual. Leave turbo on.
Watch the CPU Vcore, try and make sure it doesn’t rise above 1.24V otherwise temps will rise quickly.
Which motherboard do you have?

To go above 4GHz it takes a little more work to keep vcore low, and that is what I intend to cover in the guide. But the guide is probably at least a week away.


#16

I have the ASUS P8Z77-V LK. I also am using a Thermaltake Water 2.0 Extreme CLC (see sig rig). There’s only one heatsink above the left MOSFETs. Should I look into copper heatsinks for the remaining top MOSFETs?

Edit:

Oh I should note that I have the rad with Tt fans pushing air out the top of my case and a back 120 mm Corsair SP120 High Performance fan tied to a fan controller. I can easily push that back fan to full throttle. I don’t have anything blowing air onto the CPU socket area, so maybe that’s a cooling problem for the MOSFETs (and possibly chokes)?

Okay, so:

  1. multi up to 40 (4 Ghz)
  2. watch to make sure vcore stays under 1.24V
  3. to go beyond 4…look at pending OC guide (or if I can makes sense of the ones I’ve bookmarked).

#17

You may need extra cooling on the MOSFETS on that board, I think it’s an 8 phase design?

I’m going out tonight so I don’t have time to go into how to set it up to go above 4.0GHz and keep vcore low, maybe those other guides may help.

Basically you need to go into the power phaze delivery options and set it to “optimized”, and switch off AUTO on vcore and use a + offset, be careful here, start at an offset of 0.050, and then bring it down. Mines is stable to 4.5GHz with an offset of 0.025
Be careful though, and don’t break it.


#18

[QUOTE=Dee;2654125]You may need extra cooling on the MOSFETS on that board, I think it’s an 8 phase design?

I’m going out tonight so I don’t have time to go into how to set it up to go above 4.0GHz and keep vcore low, maybe those other guides may help.

Basically you need to go into the power phaze delivery options and set it to “optimized”, and switch off AUTO on vcore and use a + offset, be careful here, start at an offset of 0.050, and then bring it down. Mines is stable to 4.5GHz with an offset of 0.025
Be careful though, and don’t break it.[/QUOTE]

It’s only a 4+1+1 phase. I guess that means a 6 phase?

Hmm, what if I don’t touch Vcore and just bump up the multi to 40, would I still need 'sinks on those MOSFETs? What about the chokes, any need for sinks on those?

I think I’ll stay away from touching the Vcore and/or going beyond 4 GHz until I’m sure I know what the heck I’m doing. Last thing I need is to destroy this expensive new rig. :sad:

Have fun! :slight_smile:


#19

I took advantage of a Microcenter sale and upgraded my desktop computer. Went with a bundle of an Asrock Extreme4 motherboard and an i5 3570K CPU for under $300. I kept the DDR3 1866 RAM and was able to overclock it to 2133 at some fairly aggressive settings. I really like the motherboard as it will OC memory up to 2800. The overclock of the CPU to 4.4 ghz was very easy but the RAM took a little trial and error to dial in at 2133. The memory speed is blazingly fast for what I have and benches very well using AIDA64. It reconfirms to me that overclocking to the best effect should involve fast RAM in addition to a fast CPU. In many cases I have found having fast RAM can be as beneficial as having a fast CPU. When they are both fast then the speed gains are superb.

Overall, I am very impressed with the i5 3570K CPU. It is very fast and has been a decent improvement over my old Q8300 OC’ed to 3.6 ghz.