Possible hard drive failure

vbimport

#1

I have a 750GB Seagate Desktop Pro USB drive that has been acting flaky on me lately. Several times it has given me a “Windows Delayed Write” error. I contacted Seagate and they have said it could be numerous things causing the problem including a bad cable, the Windows OS, the hard drive itself or even the USB port.

The drive is still under warranty so I can get it replaced if needed. I am in the processs of transferring all the data off of it, but want to fully test it to see if its functioning 100%. I know Seagate has some utilities to do so, but are there some other good diagnostic programs that can do it as well?


#2

Best way to test it is to remove it from the external box and install it internally, using the Seagate tools to test. More often than not, the problem is the external enclosure, not the drive.


#3

OK, I think I have eliminated several possible causes. I tried a different USB cable, a different USB port and even an entirely different PC and am still getting the “Windows Delayed Write” error so I think it is the unit itself.

Here’s the thing though. I think it might be related to some sort of overheating issue with the Seagate drive itself cause if I leave it off for a bit and then re-connect it after it has cooled down a bit, it works. However, it only works temporarily before I get the “Windows Delayed Write” error again.

I thought about opening the case as suggested, but I would think that would void the warranty, right? It is only about 4 months old so I guess I could send it in. Plus, if its a SATA drive in there (and not an IDE drive), I’m not equipped right now to hook up a SATA drive to any of my PCs. So I’m thinking I might as well get all the data off of it and send it back to Seagate.

If this is the case then too bad cause Seagate drives have always been reliable for me and I have never had one crash on me yet (until now).


#4

Delayed write failure is almost always the fault of the interface or driver. And as often as not, it does not represent a problem with the data itself.


#5

OK, I discovered something else that might be a culprit. After some further investigating on the Seagate website about this error, they suggest turning off the drive’s yellow light located on the outside of the drive case. For some reason, it seemed to work.

I don’t know why, but it didn’t appear to overheat and kept working. Odd. I wouldn’t think something this simple would be a problem, but I guess if its a suggested solution on the Seagate website, then others have had the same problem and they are aware of it.


#6

[QUOTE=buscuitboy;2018152]OK, I discovered something else that might be a culprit. After some further investigating on the Seagate website about this error, they suggest turning off the drive’s yellow light located on the outside of the drive case. For some reason, it seemed to work.

I don’t know why, but it didn’t appear to overheat and kept working. Odd. I wouldn’t think something this simple would be a problem, but I guess if its a suggested solution on the Seagate website, then others have had the same problem and they are aware of it.[/QUOTE]It may have worked because, after the light was no longer powered, the hard disk received enough voltage to power the hard disk.

If the problem occurs with other drive enclosures of the same model, with correct input voltage and current, suspect an enclosure design defect.