Playing CDs created from MP3s can ruin audio system's laser when playing?

I have been told that when I make my own cd’s from mp3’s then play them on an audio system they can ruin the laser.
Do, or can copied cds that I burn on my computer ruin lasers on audio systems?
Thanks Art…

You were fooled.

i heard that when you sneeze, you can actually ruin the light aroud your nose :bigsmile: :stuck_out_tongue: :bigsmile:

Originally posted by artyriley
I have been told that when I make my own cd’s from mp3’s then play them on an audio system they can ruin the laser.
Do, or can copied cds that I burn on my computer ruin lasers on audio systems?
Thanks Art…

this is totally untrue.:slight_smile:

thanks guys!
I had to be sure, I suppose this rumour was started to stop people playing copied cds. I heard it from people who dont even own a computer! Still, I had to be sure…

A technician told me this too. But he was more specific : computer burned CDRs kill the optics of hifi CD Players.

I asked the EAC community and got three answers : one just stating he was playing CDR without problems from a long time.
One saying he did so on an audiophile Krell CD drive for so long that if there was a problem, his drive would have died long ago, and one with numbers : random playback all night long of computer CDRs in his CD Player. For one year, if I remember correctly.

But the techie had arguments too : several CD units returned to him, with the focus circuitry of the lens damaged, and measurments of the “RF” (?) signal being wat too low with computer burned CDRs, making the circuitry heating to much to amplify it.

In my opinion, either the low signal is normal (lower reflectivity) and has nothing to do with the damaged circuitry, either the Cd Players were of poor quality, and shouldn’t have failed.